Home / Tag Archives: farm bill

Tag Archives: farm bill

USDA to host 2018 Farm Bill implementation listening session

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey announced that USDA is hosting a listening session for initial input on the 2018 Farm Bill. USDA is seeking public input on the changes to existing programs implemented by the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Risk Management Agency. Each agency will take into account stakeholder input when making discretionary decisions on program implementation.

“The 2018 Farm Bill is intended to provide support, certainty and stability to our Nation’s farmers, ranchers and land stewards by enhancing farm support programs, improving crop insurance, maintaining disaster programs, and promoting and supporting voluntary conservation,” said Under Secretary Northey. “We are seeking input from stakeholders on how USDA can streamline and improve program delivery while also enhancing customer service.”

The listening session will be held Feb. 26, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. in the Jefferson Auditorium in the South Building located at 14th Street and Independence Ave.

Continue reading

Read More »

Livestock and the 2018 Farm Bill

By Matt Reese

By most accounts, the 2018 Farm Bill was a big win for livestock producers. Effective policy for the sector has largely been left out of farm bills in the past, but that trend appears changing in the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.

The 2018 Farm Bill is expected to cost $867 billion over the next decade and features major changes with dairy policy with higher coverage levels in the new Dairy Margin Coverage program (DMC). The DMC allows all dairy producers to insure margins up to $9.50 per hundredweight on their first 5 million pounds of Tier 1 production history. The DMC features lower-cost $5 margin coverage, allowing farm operations wishing to cover more than 5 million pounds of production to have a higher level of affordable catastrophic protection and expanded access to additional risk management tools allowing producers to participate in options including the Livestock Gross Margin insurance program and the new Dairy Revenue Protection program.

Continue reading

Read More »

The 2018 Farm Bill, industrial hemp and what it means for Ohio

By Ellen Essman, Sr. Research Associate Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law Program

Hemp is one of the most talked-about provisions of the new Farm Bill. There’s plenty of excitement about the removal of federal restrictions on hemp production and the economic opportunities for growing hemp. But what exactly does the Farm Bill say about hemp? Can Ohioans now grow, use and sell hemp and hemp products? We dove into the 807 pages of the Farm Bill Conference Report to find answers to your questions about the new legal status of hemp and hemp cultivation.

 

What is hemp?

Before we go much further in this discussion, it’s important to understand that both hemp and marijuana are species of cannabis, but they have different properties. Of particular note is the fact that marijuana contains much more tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) than hemp. THC is the part of a cannabis plant that can cause a psychoactive effect in certain concentrations, but hemp plants generally do not contain enough THC to produce a “high.” Hemp has many uses — it can be used for construction materials, fabrics and clothing, and animal bedding.

Continue reading

Read More »

Christmas comes early with a Dec. 20 Farm Bill

By Matt Reese and Ty Higgins

Today, President Donald Trump signed the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.

“With the passage of the farm bill we are delivering to the farmers and ranchers, who are the heart and soul of America, all sorts of things that they never even thought possible,” said President Donald Trump. “We are insuring that American agriculture will always feed our families, nourish our communities, power our commerce and inspire our nation.

“By signing this bill we are protecting our crop insurance programs and funding that producers rely on in times of disaster.”

Retired Ohio State University agricultural economics professor Carl Zulauf recently hit the high points of the 800-plus-page 2018 Farm Bill.

“This is a largely a bill that is a 5-year extension of current policy with a few exceptions in each title. The biggest exception is the Conservation Title. There are major changes in that title across all of the different programs.

Continue reading

Read More »

2018 Grain Farmers Symposium highlights

By Matt Reese

Yesterday’s 2018 Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium had a strong program that kicked off with a welcome from Lt. Governor-elect Jon Husted.

“Mike DeWine and I are working very diligently to put our administration together. We are putting the right people in place so we can get our agenda accomplished. That is our focus now in preparation for our inauguration on Jan. 14,” Husted said. “We want to make sure

workforce and training opportunities are available to everybody in rural Ohio and we also want to extend broadband to make sure that no matter where you live in Ohio you have access to the technology highway that broadband presents and creates for everybody. Those will be some of the top priorities for rural Ohio over the next few years.”

Attendees also heard updates on edge of field research from the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service, gained insights into the farm economy, and heard from Cathann Kress, Dean of the Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

Continue reading

Read More »

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018: Initial review

By Jonathan Coppess, Gary Schnitkey, Nick Paulson, Benjamin Gramig, Krista Swanson, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics University of Illinois and Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics, Ohio State University

On Monday Dec. 10, 2018, the House and Senate conference committee released the conference report for the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018; the final version of the 2018 Farm Bill. On Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Senate moved quickly to pass the conference report with a final vote in favor of the farm bill of 87 to 13. On Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, the House voted overwhelmingly to pass the farm by 369 to 47 (16 not voting). Given that it passed by veto-proof majorities, it is likely that the President will sign it and the Agricultural Act of 2018 will soon become law.

From the beginning of the debate, the outlook for a farm bill in 2018 was clouded by concerns about relatively lower crop prices, the restricting parameters of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) baseline and the political landscape in Congress.

Continue reading

Read More »

Farm bill sent to President Trump for a final signature

Congress has approved the 2018 Farm Bill, the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (H.R. 2). The legislation passed the Senate 87-13 on Dec. 11 and the House 369-47 on Dec. 12. It now goes to President Trump to be signed into law.

“The certainty of a new farm bill is very welcome news for farmers as they begin to look toward the new year. NCGA is pleased to see a return to the bipartisanship that has been a hallmark of past farm bills and we look forward to the President quickly signing the bill into law,” said Lynn Chrisp, president of the National Corn Growers Association. “To put it bluntly, the farm economy stinks. Between depressed commodity prices, record low farm incomes and tariffs and trade uncertainty, farmers are facing difficult decisions. Getting the farm bill passed, and signed into law, is one less thing they need to worry about.”

Chrisp said NCGA is most pleased to see the bill maintains support for a robust crop insurance program and strengthens the ARC-CO program through administrative improvements including a one-time program change option, an increase to the plug yield for disaster years, the use of a trend-adjusted yield factor, and a market adjustment provision for the floor price.

Continue reading

Read More »

Senate overwhelmingly passes 2018 Farm Bill

After making it out of conference late yesterday, today with a vote of 87-13 the Senate passed Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 — the final 2018 Farm Bill.

“This 2018 farm bill is a complete package — one that will serve all Americans,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president. “Farm and ranch families in particular will find a good degree of risk management support they need to help them weather the prolonged downturn in the agricultural economy that many of us are facing. Next year, we are going to face continued challenges across farm and ranch country, and this new farm bill gives us the tools we will need to weather this ongoing storm.”

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) thanked members of Congress, especially the bipartisan leaders of the House and Senate Agriculture Committees, for crafting a farm bill that includes much-needed reforms to help American dairy farmers.

Continue reading

Read More »

Farm bill progress announced

Farm bill negotiators — Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, and Ranking Member Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., and House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, and Ranking Member Collin Peterson, D-Minn. — have reached an agreement in principle on a new farm bill.

This welcome news for agriculture as the push to get a bill done in 2018 continues.

“It’s imperative that farmers and rural communities have a new farm bill this year,” said Lynn Chrisp, National Corn Growers Association president. “NCGA is grateful for today’s announcement that sets the steps in motion to ensure that happens. Our grower members have been making phone calls and sending emails to Capitol Hill urging lawmakers to reach a deal before year’s end. We thank them for heeding this call and look forward to fully reviewing the conference agreement.”

Continue reading

Read More »

Reflections on the U.S. 2018 midterm elections, trade and the farm bill

By Jonathan Coppess, Nick Paulson, Gary Schnitkey with the University of Illinois Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics and Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics

This article is composed of 4 short reflections on the 2018 U.S. midterm elections and their potential impact on U.S. farm economics and policy.

 

Carl Zulauf

A well-functioning democracy facilitates mini-revolutions via the ballot box by voters who feel overlooked or disaffected, thus minimizing the likelihood of large, pent-up revolutions. President Trump’s election in 2016 was a mini-revolution by voters, mostly in rural and industrial areas, who had experienced little economic progress or felt negatively impacted by economic, particularly trade, policy.

Results of the 2018 midterm elections will unlikely reverse the 2016 mini-revolution. Democrats won control of the House of Representatives and thus can use oversight hearings and investigations to slow the mini-revolution, but Republicans increased their control of the Senate.

Continue reading

Read More »

Thousands of farmers in Ohio the focus of farm bill crop insurance provision

By Ty Higgins and Matt Reese

Farmer-owners of Sunrise Cooperative are going to want to pay close attention to some fine print in the upcoming farm bill.

For over 15 years the Ohio-based co-op has been able to sell crop insurance and divvy out patronage checks at the end of every year, when profits are available. When the crop insurance program was created in 2000, the thought process was since co-ops work directly with farmers (the only people who would be buying crop insurance) the co-op system would be an obvious fit to market the plans.

Since then, private industry has been brought into the crop insurance mix and has made the argument that co-ops like Sunrise shouldn’t be able to sell crop insurance because laws state that crop insurance profits may not be rebated, even in the form of patronage paid by a cooperative.

“Federal Crop Insurance is a critically important tool for farmers and must be protected. 

Continue reading

Read More »

The farm bill stalemate

By Jonathan Coppess, Gary Schnitkey, Nick Paulson with the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois, and Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics at The Ohio State University

Both the House and Senate have passed versions of a farm bill this year, but they remain stuck in conference negotiations due to a stalemate over key provisions in the bills. The stalemate is caused by three intersecting issues: commodity assistance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and conservation.

 

Commodity assistance

Lower crop prices have been the defining concern in the debate over the farm support system in Title I (commodities) and crop insurance. Specifically, one hurdle going into the 2018 debate was the demand by the cotton industry to return its base acres to farm payment programs after having been removed in 2014 in response to the Brazilian World Trade Organization dispute.

Continue reading

Read More »

Farm groups pushing for a farm bill

The two largest farming groups in the United States called for swift passage of the farm bill by a congressional conference committee.

Faced with the lowest farm income in 12 years, the presidents of the American Farm Bureau Federation and National Farmers Union are asking Senate and House conferees to move quickly. Everything from commodity price supports to childhood nutrition, soil and water conservation, trade promotion and more depend on swift passage.

“America’s farmers and ranchers persevere even in the toughest times, but the farm economy has gone from bad to worse,” said Zippy Duvall, AFBF president. “Tariffs and stagnant global demand for commodities have left the agriculture economy in the worst shape we have seen since the farm crisis of the 1980s. Lender surveys and our own experience tell us spring could bring a wave of farm closures unless there’s major improvement in the marketplace.

“Farmers and ranchers need the certainty that the farm bill provides to maintain the food security that all Americans want and need.

Continue reading

Read More »

Brown appointed to Farm Bill Conference Committee

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) was appointed to serve as a conferee on the committee that will reconcile the differences between the House and Senate versions of the 2018 Farm Bill. The Senate version of the Farm Bill included several Ohio provisions that Brown helped to secure. Brown is the first Ohioan to serve on the Senate Agriculture Committee in more than 40 years, and his standing on the committee will help ensure that Ohio farmers have a seat at the table. It is the second Farm Bill conference committee upon which Brown has served.

As a conferee, Brown will continue fighting for Ohio provisions, including language to better support Ohio farmers, protect Lake Erie, spur economic development in rural Ohio, and feed hungry families. Brown secured these priorities in the Senate bill after hearing from Ohio farmers, small businesses, and sportsmen during a series of roundtable discussions he hosted throughout the state.

Continue reading

Read More »

Incentives for better food choices may be in 2018 Farm Bill

Encouraging people to choose cucumbers over, say, potato chips or milk instead of soda can be a hard sell. Federal legislators are considering ways to do that.

Both the U.S. Senate’s and the House of Representatives’ versions of the federal farm bill include funding to measure how effectively financial incentives inspire people who receive food stamps to eat more vegetables and fruits, whole grains and low-fat dairy products, said Carl Zulauf, an agricultural economist and professor emeritus with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University.

Currently, there are no restrictions on buying food with little nutritional value. But food stamp recipients have been given financial incentives through pilot projects in various states to reward them for buying more fresh produce.

Escalating healthcare costs have sparked federal legislators’ interest in enticing more healthy eating to bring down medical costs and improve the quality of lives among people who receive food stamps, also known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Zulauf said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Episode 63 | Quick progress with crops and the Farm Bill

Forget corn getting knee-high by the 4th of July. Many Ohio fields are tasseling this week. Joel Penhorwood checks in with Farm Science Review’s Nate Douridas, Dale Minyo visits with Wyandot County farmer Joe Shaeffer and Matt talks dairy goats with Mark Baden, who recently judged at the National Dairy Goat Show in Columbus. Ty Higgins hosts this week’s podcast, brought to you by AgriGold.

Continue reading

Read More »

Senate passes 2018 Farm Bill, sets stage for final passage this year

On June 28 the Senate passed its version of the 2018 farm bill with a bipartisan vote of 86-11. The House passed its version on June 21. The two measures will now be reconciled before a final version is sent to President Trump for his signature.

“Chairman Roberts and Ranking Member Stabenow worked with other members of the Senate Agriculture Committee to deliver a bill that will continue to provide the risk management tools that America’s farmers need more than ever before. And the fact that Leader McConnell agreed this should be a legislative priority helped move this very important bill forward in the Senate,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president. “Of course, no bill is ever perfect, but this bipartisan effort gives us a solid framework for progress. We do have concerns about some of the provisions that were added to the bill that make it harder for farmers to manage risk, but we are confident that those issues can be satisfactorily addressed by the House/Senate conference committee.

Continue reading

Read More »

Progress and hurdles for the 2018 Farm Bill

By Jonathan Coppess, Gary Schnitkey, and Nick Paulson, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics
University of Illinois, and Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics
Ohio State University

The odds for a farm bill in 2018 have improved considerably. On June 13 the Senate Ag Committee moved its version of a farm bill with a strong bipartisan vote (20 to 1).

House leadership is attempting to resolve the immigration issue that contributed to the House Ag Committee’s farm bill defeat on the floor. This may pave the way for a House vote reconsidering the farm bill, but success remains uncertain. Among the issues that could present hurdles to completing a farm bill, one has gained particular attention thanks to a recent public dispute that was punctuated by Senator Grassley’s (R-IA) lone vote against the farm bill in the Senate Ag Committee: eligibility requirements for, and limits on, farm program payments.

Continue reading

Read More »

House passes version of the 2018 Farm Bill

After postponing a vote on immigration compromise legislation, the U.S. House of Representative’s voted 213-211 to approve H.R. 2, the 2018 Farm Bill on June 21.

“By approving the 2018 Farm Bill today, members of the House recognized the serious economic challenges facing farmers and ranchers across the country,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president. “As crafted by Chairman Conaway, this bill recognizes what is working well, but it also makes much-needed improvements in risk management and crop insurance programs at a time when farm-income levels have slumped to decade lows. This would not have been possible had it not been for Speaker Ryan making the farm bill a congressional priority, and for all the hard work invested in the process by Chairman Conaway and other members of the House Agriculture Committee.”

The vote brings the possibility of a timely farm bill this year a reality, said Kevin Kester, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association president.

Continue reading

Read More »

Senate Farm Bill passes committee — Lake Erie, dairy programs included

By Joel Penhorwood

he Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry passed their version of the 2018 Farm Bill on Wednesday, 20-1.

Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), a member of the Committee, said it’s an important bipartisan effort during a crucial time for Ohio agriculture and natural resources.

“This bipartisan bill is good for farmers, good for families, good for taxpayers, good for jobs, and good for Lake Erie,” Brown said. “This bill is a big win for Ohio, and it’s the product of a long, bipartisan process, working with farmers and stakeholders over the past year.”

Listen to Sen. Brown’s comments following the vote.

Sen. Brown spoke with reporters in a conference call immediately after the vote. He was joined by Dr. Cathann Kress, Dean of the Ohio State College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. She commented on the positive movement forward for Ohio agriculture.

Known formally as the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, the legislation can be read in its entirety here.

Continue reading

Read More »