Home / Slider (page 4)

Slider

Piney Paradise: A family activity

By Matt Reese

The holiday season means many different things to many different people — faith, family, tradition, gatherings, and decorations. For the Bauer family in Huron County, these important holiday staples remain a focus all year on their Piney Paradise Christmas Tree Farm as they prepare for the holiday sales season.

In the early 1970s Gary Bauer served as an FFA advisor at Big Walnut in central Ohio. During that time he became familiar with Wade and Gatton Nurseries. He also worked with the FFA selling Christmas trees as a fundraiser. This led to an initial effort to plant Christmas trees on a few acres in the Sunbury area. In the late 70s, though, career changes took the Bauer family to where Gary grew up in Huron County. He took a different job teaching ag, and later moved into an Extension role as an ag educator in the diverse, horticulture-heavy Erie County.… Continue reading

Read More »

Why do we still see so much tillage across Ohio?

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Pick-up any farm publication and chances are you will find an article about the use of cover crops or no-till farming. Drive across any rural county in Ohio and chances are you will find a field that has recently been tilled. With all the current research evaluating best management practices utilizing no-till and cover crops, why do we still see so much tillage across the state?

Just ask a group of farmers gathered at the local elevator or coffee shop what their top reasons for tillage are, and more than likely there will be a rather consistent list. Those reasons often cited include: breaking-up soil compaction, managing crop residue, controlling weeds and diseases, and improving yields. Most will admit that they have tried and like the concept of no-till farming, especially from the standpoint of making fewer trips across the field. In the same conversation however, they will often talk about the challenges they face on heavier soils with compaction issues and managing crop residue.

Continue reading

Read More »

Is there room for a rally?

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

After 3 weeks of declining futures levels, beans rallied 20 cents last week. Plus, China announced they will remove some soybean tariffs, which would help prices if purchases follow. Since farmers haven’t been selling much due to low future values, basis continues to get stronger. My local processor increased bids another 5 cents, totaling 35 cents since the end of October.

Some are suggesting the slow harvest pace may be bullish. However, looking back, this year’s harvest is only 1% behind last year’s pace at this point, and only 3% behind the last 5 year’s average. Even if 1% is never harvested, that only represents 44 million lost bushels, or approximately 10% of the expected carryout. With the projected carryout likely being the second highest on record, it’s too early to know if prices would improve. If export pace slows, this possible reduction may not matter.… Continue reading

Read More »

Lackluster December report from USDA

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

No changes in U.S. corn exports or U.S. ending stocks for corn, soybeans, and wheat. Can you say, “boring”? Following the report corn was unchanged, soybeans up 1 cent, and wheat up 1 cent. Before the report corn was unchanged, soybeans up 3 cents, and wheat unchanged.

This report had zero changes in U.S. 2019 corn and soybean production, yields, and harvested acres. This follows the pattern seen in past December WASDE reports.

Continuing to be dominant in the grains news cycle are the U.S./China trade talks along with ongoing weather in South America. Today their weather is a non-issue.

The major numbers traders will be watching today included U.S. corn exports and production estimates from South America. Today USDA estimated U.S. corn exports at 1.850 billion bushels. Last month they were 1.850 billion bushels. USDA pegged Brazil’s soybean production at 123 million tons and corn production at 101 million tons.… Continue reading

Read More »

A lesson in service

By Matt Reese

Once again this year, the day after Veteran’s Day, 100 Christmas trees were packed up and shipped off to military units overseas through a partnership between the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Ohio Christmas Tree Association for the Operation Evergreen Program. Christmas tree growers from around Ohio donate the trees and deliver them to the ODA where nursery inspectors certify they are free from pests and disease. Both groups come together at ODA to wrap, load up and send the trees to military members stationed overseas. This is the 24th year for the program that got its start in Ohio. The trees cost $150 a tree for shipping and the expenses are covered through donations.

“This year we are sending the trees overseas to Kuwait. They leave and get to Kuwait in two weeks and then they get dispersed to the bases in the area,” said Valarie Graham with the Ohio Christmas Tree Association.… Continue reading

Read More »

South America: Mr. Trump, we haven’t devaluated our currency on purpose

Last week, President Trump tweeted that he would restore tariffs on all steel and aluminum that Brazil and Argentina export to the United States. He would do that because, according to his tweet, the two South American countries “have been presiding over a massive devaluation of their currencies”, which is “not good” for American farmers.

He is right. The devaluation of the Brazilian real and the Argentine peso really is a bummer for American farmers. It makes producers in those countries happy with the price received for the products they ship, and that spurs farmer selling. At the same time, prices in U.S. dollars paid by importers don’t necessarily climb – sometimes they even fall, making South American exports more competitive when compared to products shipped by the United States.

A metric ton of Brazilian soybeans priced at $350 FOB Santos, for example, equals to BRL1,050 when the Brazilian real is at BRL3 to the dollar.Continue reading

Read More »

Frobose Meat Locker adding local flavor to community

By Matt Reese

Much of rural and small town Ohio is built on the character of local agricultural businesses that have been woven into the fabric of the community — a bit of local flavor.

There a few better examples of this local flavor than Frobose Meat Locker in the village of Pemberville in Wood County. The business includes, of course, a meat locker where customers can rent freezer space to house their meats, but the business is widely known for its vast array of brat recipes and high quality, locally produced meat products. The family business is also known for its role in the local culture.

Bob and Elaine Frobose both grew up on area farms and now they operate Frobose Meat Locker with their children Ben, Jacob, Zach, and Abby. The family raises cattle and a few pigs to supply the business along with procuring poultry, pork and beef from area farms.… Continue reading

Read More »

2019 Ohio No-Till Conference highlights

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Panel Discussions, a 19,000-acre cover crop grower, and the Ohio Director of Agriculture highlighted the 2019 Ohio No-Till Conference at Der Dutchman in Plain City on Thursday. Ohio No-Till Council President Jan Layman from Hardin County welcomed a near capacity crowd of farmers and agribusiness people to the annual meeting of conservation minded farmers eager to discuss some of the lessons learned from what proved to be a very challenging year.

With a backdrop of hot coffee and freshly baked donuts, many attendees discussed the past growing season and shared stories of the weather struggles going back to the fall of 2018. The conference program started on an optimistic note with a panel discussion looking ahead at best practices to manage cover crops going into the spring of 2020. Participants Nathan Brause, Cody Beacom, Jay Brandt, Glen Harsh, and Eric Niemeyer shared their experiences and lessons to carry forward.… Continue reading

Read More »

Celebrating 20 years of Youth Outdoors

By Valerie Hura, 4-H Educator, Youth Outdoors

Happy birthday to Youth Outdoors! Since 1999, over 10,000 youth have participated in programs that connect underserved youth in Cleveland to outdoor programs.

Youth Outdoors provides leadership for over 500 programs annually, reaching approximately 700 youth who participate in adventure clubs, short-term groups and horseback riding activities. Five special events each year reach an estimated 3,000 people.

The partnership between Cleveland Metroparks, Ohio State University Extension 4-H and the City of Cleveland has been providing “Growth Through Adventure” for 20 years. Leaders of that era: Director Vern Hartenburg (Cleveland Metroparks), State 4-H Leader Jeff King (OSU Extension) and Mayor Michael White (City of Cleveland), explored possible ways of connecting city youth to the outdoor world using adventure recreation. Extension Educator Greg Yost and Recreation Specialist John Rode came together to lay the foundation of what would become Youth Outdoors.

Cleveland Metroparks had the outdoor program expertise, access to natural resources and funding.… Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio Farm Bureau highlights past success and plans the future at 101st annual meeting

The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation rounded out its 100th year with the 101st annual meeting this week where there was plenty to celebrate and discuss.

“Less than 1% of U.S. companies make it to their centennial. I couldn’t be more excited for Ohio Farm Bureau members and their organization,” said Frank Burkett, III, OFBF president. “Our members are committed to water quality in the state of Ohio, so we had a lot of discussion on nutrient management, and at the same time we are going to have a lot of fun celebrating where we are today and where we are going in the next 100 years.”

Some of the other key policy discussions included transportation and infrastructure and wildlife management. The approved policies set the direction for the organization’s activities in the coming year. A record 381 delegates representing all county Farm Bureaus participated in the debate and discussion.… Continue reading

Read More »

Brazil stealing corn exports

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Demand bears were quite pleased with their positions during the month of November. It’s no secret that corn demand has been shrinking for consecutive months. Increased corn production in Brazil and Argentina have been stealing corn exports out of the U.S. In recent months U.S. corn export projections from USDA have shrunk several hundred million bushels. In addition, October and November weather in South America was non-threatening. There is no story to date of weather concerns, which might reduce production during their current growing season.

The NASS Weekly Crop Progress Report of Nov. 25 had the U.S. corn harvest at 84% with the average at 96%. The weekly progress reports are scheduled to continue into the early weeks of December when typically they end around Thanksgiving.

Both corn and soybean prices fell during November. Corn was down 18 cents, soybeans down 56 cents, while wheat was up 27 cents.… Continue reading

Read More »

Phytophthora sojae survey by the numbers

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Since 2016, numbers tell the story. Three states, four years, 128 farms, and 1,280 soil samples. Linda Weber, a graduate student researcher in plant pathology at OARDC has been collecting samples and screening over 400 isolates of Phytophthora sojae against the single resistance genes that are currently available in today’s cultivars. “Researchers evaluate 14 single resistance genes, however there are only about 6 genes that are currently available in cultivars,” Weber said. This survey is funded by money from the Ohio Soybean Check-off through the North Central Soybean Research Program. Weber is evaluating the effectiveness of single resistance genes against the Phytophthora sojae pathogen.

Phytophthora sojae is a soil borne pathogen that causes Phytophthora Root Rot and Stem Rot. “This is a major cause of soybean yield losses annually,” Weber said. “Soil types found in Ohio, such as the heavier clay soils, when they are saturated in the spring, are ideal for Phytophthora Root and Stem Rot to develop.”

The project is titled “Phytophthora sojae Pathotype Variability across Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky.

Continue reading

Read More »

Cryptocurrency — What you need to know from a tax perspective

By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA, Partner at Holbrook & Manter, CPAs

Regardless of your opinion about cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, one thing is for certain — they are here to stay. Since their beginnings a decade ago, much mystery has surrounded cryptocurrencies regarding their origins, value and purposes. As cryptocurrencies have become more established and accepted as payment, it is more important to understand what the treatment and consequences of purchasing, selling, paying with and accepting as payment cryptocurrencies from a tax perspective.

Per IRS Notice 2014-21, cryptocurrencies are not legal tender, but are generally regarded as property comparable to that of a stock, bond or other investments. Treating cryptocurrencies in this manner means whenever a cryptocurrency is purchased as an investment, the basis in the cryptocurrency is the purchase price plus any permitted transaction fees just like other stock that is traded on an exchange. This also means that whenever the cryptocurrency is sold, a capital gain or loss will result from its sale.… Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 131 | Carbon and Cover Crops

Dale, Bart, and Matt are in the hot seat this week on the Ohio Ag Net Podcast brought to you by AgriGold. Dale catches up with John Linder at the National Association of Farm Broadcasting annual convention and meeting. Dale also catches up with Noah Walker from Indigo Carbon talking all things carbon credits. That and more this week on the podcast!… Continue reading

Read More »

Will Brazil plant corn later than normal in 2020?

The soybean planting in south-central Brazil is now relatively on pace with historical averages, but irregular rains in September, October and early November resulted in delays in several states. Those delays are not likely to cause yield losses to the soybean crop, but will result in a narrower planting window for the second corn crop (“safrinha”), which is planted right after the soybean harvest. A later-than-normal harvest will lead to a delayed start to the corn planting and, probably, to an extension of the planting season into March.

How bad is planting in March?
Planting corn in March is not unusual. On the contrary, since the ideal planting window ends in mid-March in several Brazilian regions. But planting in March normally results in more risk, because corn will pollinate under potentially harmful weather conditions: lack of moisture, shorter days and even freezing temperatures in some areas. That’s why farmers are always planning on planting as soon as possible. 

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio soy industry highlights accomplishments and recognizes leaders

By Matt Reese and Dale Minyo

The challenging 2019 growing season in many parts of Ohio did not dampen the spirits at the Ohio Soybean Industry Dinner.

One highlight of the evening was a brief update from Ed Beaman from the U.S. Soybean Export Council that was recognized with the 2019 Outstanding Achievement Award. Beaman talked about the strategy the organization uses to expand soybean markets around the world.

“It is a long term relationship building effort. It is fun for me to remind people that U.S. soy was in China for almost 12 and a half years before we sold any soybeans. And we are working in other markets employing the same tactics, using the same messaging as we did in China to build those other markets. While we probably don’t have a silver bullet to replace China, I do think we have a lot of silver buckshot. If we can employ that buckshot around the world properly then I think U.S.… Continue reading

Read More »

Pockets and windows: 2019 year in review

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension corn specialist, likes to refer to the 2019 growing season as one filled with “pockets and windows.”

There were pockets of Ohio that had windows of opportunity to plant on time. There were pockets of Ohio that never had a window to plant. There were pockets that had short windows, and pockets where the windows that came too late. Ohio experienced both pockets of flooding and drought in 2019. Wood County led the state with over 52% of the acres never planted due to wet soils. By the end of the growing season, over 80% of the state was considered abnormally dry, or in some level of a drought according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

“In spite of all the tremendous variability in the 2019 growing season, the yields that are being reported are surprisingly good,” Thomison said.… Continue reading

Read More »

Basis worth watching this winter

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Corn basis for fall 2019 and into January-March 2020 has been relatively flat for months. Numerous Ohio locations have the nearby corn basis at anywhere from 10 to 40 cents over the December CBOT. Flat price levels from fall into January often only provided a gain of 10 to 15 cents compared to that of past years when the gain could have approached 30 cents or more. Producers seem content to sock as much corn away as possible into home storage bins with the anticipation of higher prices down the road.

Soybean basis on the other hand late October and early November saw improvements in numerous facilities across Ohio of 10 to 20 cents for nearby delivery as the harvest wound to completion. Also, deliveries for January to March had basis improvement of 5 to 10 cents.

Demand bears have been most pleased to see corn prices stall and retreat the last two weeks of October.Continue reading

Read More »

Marketing results of December options

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

As corn harvest finishes in many areas, and free harvest storage time is up, farmers need to decide if they will price grain now or pay for storage and wait for a rally. Given this week’s price dip, it seems some may have already “thrown in the towel” and priced some corn in commercial storage.

On a positive note, some end users across the Corn Belt increased corn basis bids 10 to 15 cents from last week. There are also some reports of free DP (deferred pricing) being offered in areas where corn harvest is finished, and farmers aren’t motivated to sell at these lower prices.

Bean futures are struggling with no China trade deal. However, since farmers aren’t selling, basis continues to climb. My local processor increased their basis bid another 5 cents this week. That makes it a 25-cent improvement in 25 days, while my local elevator is up only 7 cents in the same time period.… Continue reading

Read More »

2019 Ohio water quality update

By Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension agronomist

Lake Erie wasn’t as bad as expected. What? We missed 1.5 million acres of crops, and from my eye mostly in northwest Ohio. But here is the deal: you did apply fertilizer last year, and probably the year before. We farm in a leaky system and I learned this week that entropy is working against us — meaning it will get more random. So, yes it’s leaky and will perhaps get a little more leaky. We did not plant as many crops and yes we applied less fertilizer in the Lake Erie basin, but the leaks still happen even without the crop because we still have rain, and rain moves that little tiny bit of phosphorus off your farm and downstream.

This from NOAA about the Harmful Algal Bloom on Lake Erie, on Oct. 31, (http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/research/habs/forecasting):

  • The Microcystis cyanobacteria bloom in 2019 had a severity index (SI) of 7.3, indicating a relatively severe bloom.
Continue reading

Read More »