Home / Slider (page 30)

Slider

Big yields to start 2018 Between the Rows harvest

We are pretty happy. We are 10% done with corn and 15% done with soybeans. We got started last Monday Sept. 17 in some corn. The moisture starting off was 21% to 23%. We had a small patch that was an earlier hybrid that came in at 18.5%.

We haven’t really seen anything under 190 bushels and the sky is the limit the other way. We have seen up to 230 and we have only run the earlier hybrids with 103- and 104-day corn. It has met our expectations and it is definitely going to be good. It will be right at the yields we had last year. I’m not sure it will be much better than last year but I think it will come off at a lower moisture.

The soybeans, I think, are the big story in the area with yields anywhere from 60 to 80 bushels with the majority of the yields I have heard around 70.

Continue reading

Read More »

Good old days on a Century Farm

I love to visit farms recognized through the Ohio Department of Agriculture Ohio Historic Family Farm Program each year for many reasons. There is usually fascinating history, there are always great family stories and there are generally some impressive historic structures to gawk at when you think about how they were built so long ago. Another reason Century Farm visits are so valuable is the perspective they provide.

It is so easy to get caught up in the busy schedule of today’s society. It seems that we have so much to do these days compared to those tales of yesteryear that are always so prevalent in my visits to Century Farms. Why is that? After years of learning about Ohio’s agricultural history, I continue to arrive at the same answer to that question: food.

Just a couple of generations back, whether they lived in the city or the country, people spent significantly more time and resources on food than we do today.

Continue reading

Read More »

Late-season weather impacts corn and soybean growth and development

By Kyle Poling, Pioneer Field Agronomist, Ada, Ohio

Physiological maturity of a soybean seed occurs when the seed has completely lost all green color and turns yellow. At this point grain moisture is still over 50%, but a harvestable moisture of near 13% can be reached in as little as two weeks under good drying conditions. In order to time harvest perfectly, it is necessary to monitor soybean drying very closely. At full maturity (R8), 95% of pods have reached their mature pod color. At the R8 growth stage, only five to 10 good drying days are needed before harvest. Begin checking grain moisture before all the leaves have dropped off all the plants as various stresses can cause soybeans to retain some leaves. It is not uncommon to see a few green leaves and stems on some plants after the pods are fully ripe and the soybeans are dry enough for harvest.

Continue reading

Read More »

Farm Science Review 2018 photo highlights (and memories)

“Welp, we’re going to try and get around the grounds pretty quickly today so we can get you boys back to school before the end of the day.”

The two third grade boys in the back seat looked at each other with genuine concern.

We were on our way to the 2018 Farm Science Review with my friend Jon Miller, his son, Carter, and my son, Parker. This was the first time visiting the show for the two excited farm boys.

Jon took the boys around the exhibit area in the morning before working an afternoon shift in the Ohio Corn and Wheat building and then I took the boys out to the harvest demonstration area in the afternoon to help me with taking photos. The boys helped me find good ears of corn and the best-looking combines in the field for picture subject matter. They also provided entertaining commentary about their differing paint colors of choice, rooting on the combines accordingly.

Continue reading

Read More »

My favorite Farm Science Review memory

By Joel Penhorwood

My favorite FSR memory beings with the doldrums of school that start in September.

Pretty much one thing kept my attention — that special day when Dad would keep me home and instead of going to school, we would head to Farm Science Review.

We got up early (which never seemed to be a problem on this day in particular, though every other was a struggle) and headed to London. We made sure to leave enough time to stop at the same restaurant every year, the now-defunct Amish Kitchen, a Der Dutchman style restaurant where we would have the breakfast buffet. For some reason, it always tasted better than any other breakfast I had.

We sat in the same area by the same fireplace and had the same conversation — things we were looking forward to seeing during the day ahead.

I always preferred seeing all the exhibits and ending up lugging around about 50 pounds worth of freebies by the time the day was through.

Continue reading

Read More »

A backwards house did not keep a farm family from moving forward

By Matt Reese

Calvin Peterson — the sixth generation on the Ohio Historic Family Farm in Ross County — can still remember when the back of his beautiful brick house became the front.

“The house was built facing Rt. 11 down a long lane. U.S. 35 came through in 1935 near the back of the house, so now the back of the house faces the road,” Calvin said.

Incidentally, U.S. 35 has since been moved and turned into a four-lane highway and now the Peterson house sits on Old U.S. 35. The house was built more than 100 years before Old U.S. 35 — making the house really old, but meticulously cared for and well preserved.

The Peterson family was among the very first to put down deep agricultural roots in northern Ross County. John Martin Peterson was born in Hardy County, Va. He was the son of Jacob and Sarah Peterson who sailed from Switzerland to America in 1736.

Continue reading

Read More »

Making time for history on an Ohio Century Farm

By Matt Reese

Grandkids interested in a treasure hunt, a grim prostate cancer diagnosis and a farmer with a long family history on the land — in 2016 it was time.

Though he had been putting it off for years because there was always something more pressing, Rick Crawford finally decided that it was time to plod up the steps of the deteriorating old house on his family’s Adams County farm to investigate the old trunks filled with unknown farm history from generations gone by. They discovered the old house was full of critters and family memories.

“To the best of my knowledge when Robert Richard — my great-great grandfather — moved here in 1875, that old log cabin was already here. When I was 7, my great grandfather died in 1960 and he was the last family member to live there. After that we rented it out. I was in and out of it after that when we were renting it, but I don’t think the tenants ever went upstairs.

Continue reading

Read More »

Farm Science Review expands exhibit area substantially, other improvements

By Joel Penhorwood

Some may recall the soggy situation at the 2017 Farm Science Review when heavy rains plagued the event and led to swamped areas on the grounds. To address that issue, new water control structures are being installed for an improved visitor experience in case Mother Nature does not cooperate in the future.

“We are in the process of a multi-year drainage project we have going on here at the Farm Science Review,” said Garrett Nowak, FSR site manager. “Last year, you may remember we had a little bit of wet weather. Some years, we’re really dry — other years we’re a little damp — it’s just part of being an outdoor farm show. As much as we can address those issues, we try to.

“We’re doing over 1,500 feet of drainage this year. Most of that is going to be a new sub-main we’re running almost from the total south end of the exhibit area, all the way to the north and little over 1,500 feet of 12-inch tile under our Hay Street.

Continue reading

Read More »

National Farm Safety Week resources can minimize problems year round

By Matt Reese

There is no doubt: it is not always convenient, or easy, or enjoyable to focus on farm safety issues. But the time and effort involved with a focus on farm safety is always worth the investment compared to the heartbreak resulting from tragedies that take place on farms every year. National Farm Safety Week is Sept. 16 to 22 this year and it is an important opportunity for farmers to re-focus on farm safety heading into the busy harvest months, not only for themselves and their families, but also their farm employees.

“Agriculture is still one of the most hazardous industries not only in Ohio but in the U.S. Safety in agriculture is a key component to preventing severe injuries and fatalities,” said Kent McGuire, Ohio State University’s Health and Safety Coordinator in the College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. “As an agricultural employer it is important to make safety a priority and take the time to train your employees on safe work practices and recognizing hazards.

Continue reading

Read More »

2018 Corn Harvest Cab Cam – Rob McCarley, Pickaway County

When Rob McCarley and his son first checked the moisture levels of his early planted Pickaway County corn fields he knew they would be close to ready to go, but he had no idea they would be as ready as they were. The McCarley’s quickly started the 2018 harvest season on September 12th. The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins joined them a couple of days later for the first corn harvest Cab Cam of 2018, brought to you by Fennig Equipment.

Continue reading

Read More »

Should you adjust your estimated tax payments?

harvest10

By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA is a Principal with Holbrook & Manter, CPAs

While it’s hard to believe harvest season is upon us, we all know year-end tax planning is also just around the corner. If you are an individual business owner or have ownership in a pass-through entity, you should consider revising your 4th quarter tax estimates. In addition to your individual specific situations, taxpayers also need to consider the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This legislation drastically overhauled the tax code for the first time in decades. Many of the changes will directly impact your tax situation for 2018. Some of the highlights are:

  1. New income tax rates and brackets: While the total number of brackets remains at 7, the top rate will fall from 39.6% to 37%, and the amount of income covered by the lower brackets has been adjusted upward.
  2. Standard deduction increased: The standard deduction for individuals increases to $12,000 for single filers and $24,000 for joint filers.
Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio farm safety stats: Setting a goal for zero fatalities

By Dee Jepsen

National Farm Safety and Health Week is September 16‐22, 2018. This annual promotional week commemorates the hard work, diligence, and sacrifices made by our nation’s farmers and ranchers.

The 2018 theme is “Cultivating the Seeds of Safety.” During fall harvest, it is good to reflect on the bounties ahead, by practicing safety throughout the seasons. Farmers, farm families, and farm workers need to know they are valued for the food, fuel and fiber they produce. The safety theme can remind us of the unexpected tragedy a death or serious injury can play, and how it can also impact our business and our entire agricultural community.

Over the past 10 years, 128 Ohio farmers lost their lives doing what they love to do — farm. While the number of farm fatalities is decreasing from what they were 20 years ago, 128 deaths are still too many! This article will help us see who is affected by farm tragedies, and how these deaths have occurred.

Continue reading

Read More »

Fredericktown High School receives Ohio Historical Marker for FFA jacket

By Kayla Hawthorne, OCJ field reporter

Fredericktown Local School District received an Ohio Historical Marker for the world’s first blue corduroy jackets worn by members of the National FFA Organization.

The historical marker sign states, “In 1933, Dr. J.H. “Gus” Lintner, a Fredericktown teacher and advisor to the local FFA chapter, commissioned a jacket for its members to wear to FFA’s national convention in Kansas City, Missouri.” The national organization then adopted the jacket as part of the official dress for FFA members.

The historical marker will be placed in front of the school so it can be viewed by students and visitors.

“Tonight was a very exciting moment, not only for Fredericktown FFA, but FFA in general,” said Holly McClay, Ohio FFA State Vice President at the event.

Two of the members of the Fredericktown FFA chapter from 1933 were in attendance at the event. Linden Scheff and Neil Overly — who were in the original 1933 Fredericktown FFA band that wore the first FFA jackets to the National Convention — got to unveil the marker.

Continue reading

Read More »

Surprises across the board for corn, soybeans, and wheat

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Corn was bearish with the U.S. yield at 181.3. Soybeans were higher in spite of larger than expected yields. China soybean imports are declining less than expected tempering bearish numbers for soybeans. Russia wheat exports are unchanged.

It was surprises across the board for corn, soybeans, and wheat.

A news flash from Reuters News and the WSJ from earlier this morning, said, “U.S. proposing new round of trade talks with China in the near future.” That news moved soybeans 12 cents off the day’s lows. Moments before the report release soybeans were 6 cents above the day’s lows.

Harvest is only underway in limited areas across Ohio. Today’s USDA report has producers across Ohio and the Midwest anxious for even a whisper somewhere of friendly news in the grains complex.

The biggest concern today is the U.S. soybean yield, production, and ending stocks. It seems a forgone conclusion those numbers will increase from August.

Continue reading

Read More »

Talking the divide between U.S., Canada dairy supply systems

By Joel Penhorwood

The trip to Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show by several Ohio dairy farmers, thanks to the efforts of Hill’s Supply, put on display not only the latest in robotic milking technology, but also the relationship between Canadian and American dairy farmers in what has been a contentious time with regard to trade.

Ongoing North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) renegotiations have highlighted the differences between the two countries on milk production.

“The dairy industry is challenging right now. As you look across Ohio and the nation, our nation’s dairy farmers are facing an economic downturn that’s rivaling the downturn that many of us remember in 2009,” said Frank Burkett III. Burkett, a dairy farmer and current president of the Ohio Farm Bureau, has signed a letter of intent on buying Hill’s Supply in the near future. “We look through Hill’s for ways to partner with dairymen to get through this cycle and move onto another cycle that hopefully delivers a little bit better economics and maybe a littler prosperity into dairy farmers.”

Trade is an essential part of market prices in any agricultural commodity, milk included.

Continue reading

Read More »

Yield monitor considerations

By John Fulton (FABE Associate Professor), Elizabeth Hawkins (OSUE Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems) and Richard Colley III (Digital Ag Program Manager)

Harvest has started here in Ohio but it is good to remember to make sure your yield monitor is setup and calibrated properly. Geo-referenced yield data (i.e. yield maps) are being used more frequently to provide precision agriculture insights and recommendations at the field level. Yield maps not only help growers understand end-of-year performance within fields, but also can be used to characterize in-field variation. Information about this variation is often used by service providers to deliver prescriptions, recommendations, or other information back to the farmer. Because yield maps continue to be an important data layer to learn from and help drive changes or decisions at a field level, proper management of the yield monitor is critical to generate accurate and reliable yield data. Grain moisture and test weight, along with grain flow through the combine, will vary within passes and across fields.

Continue reading

Read More »

Consider market carry when making basis comparisons

Wheat futures continued their collapse in early September, down 16% in value since August. In the last 3 months, corn is down 12% and beans 20%.

A record harvest is expected and many farmers are sitting on a lot of unpriced old crop. This in turn is creating logistical problems everywhere. Without a huge surprise yield reduction in the USDA report this week or a trade fix with China, the market will probably stay at these low values through harvest.

 

Understanding market carry’s relationship to basis values

I recently reviewed if there was a better basis opportunity to sell my 2017 corn earlier this year. My explanation confused a few people. Here is recap of that review:

I had the opportunity to set the basis at -.21 the Sep instead of the -.43 the Dec that is posted today. However, if we apply the value of the spread at 15 cents to the Sep basis we find that -.21 the Sep is/was actually -.36 the Dec.

Continue reading

Read More »