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Ohio State’s Dr. Bobby Moser to Retire

The longest-tenured dean at The Ohio State University announced his transition plans today.

Bobby D. Moser, vice president for Agricultural Administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), said he would step down as dean once his replacement is found.  He has agreed to stay on during a transitional period to assist a new dean and will be accepting some new assignments once the search is completed.

As vice president for agricultural administration, Moser oversees the college, Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), and the Agricultural Technical Institute (ATI). This includes 1,900 faculty and staff, 3,200 students, and an annual budget of $195 million.

Moser has served as vice president and dean at CFAES for nearly 20 years.  He is also executive dean of the university’s professional colleges and served as vice president for university outreach from 2001 to 2008.

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Ohio State's Dr. Bobby Moser to Retire

The longest-tenured dean at The Ohio State University announced his transition plans today.

Bobby D. Moser, vice president for Agricultural Administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), said he would step down as dean once his replacement is found.  He has agreed to stay on during a transitional period to assist a new dean and will be accepting some new assignments once the search is completed.

As vice president for agricultural administration, Moser oversees the college, Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), and the Agricultural Technical Institute (ATI). This includes 1,900 faculty and staff, 3,200 students, and an annual budget of $195 million.

Moser has served as vice president and dean at CFAES for nearly 20 years.  He is also executive dean of the university’s professional colleges and served as vice president for university outreach from 2001 to 2008.

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Cuts in feed use likely at $7 corn

With the 2011 corn crop not likely big enough to meet demand and as prices continue to rise, livestock producers soon might be facing a critical decision: whether they should reduce their use of corn for feed.

Purdue Extension agricultural economist Chris Hurt said the livestock industry probably would cut back when 2012 crop prices rise above $7 per bushel – a level the market has now reached.

The USDA’s August World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates, or WASDE, report forecast the average U.S. farm corn price between $6.20 and $7.20 per bushel. The corn futures market prices have surpassed the $6.70 mid-point of USDA’s range and are now pricing in the low-to-mid $7 area for 2011 average cash crop prices.

For the pork industry specifically, Hurt estimates producers could pay, on average, about $6.85 per bushel for corn and still meet other operating costs.

“Corn prices will have to move to new record highs on a marketing year basis to get animal industries to reduce corn use, and they are doing that now,” Hurt said.

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It is time to scout for soybean diseases

By Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist

We don’t recommend growing soybeans year-after-year in the same field. The list is endless why this is not a good thing to do, but we also know that commodity prices, planting restrictions, landlords, and other factors force this option on almost a third of our field crop production acreage.

This production practice is less than optimal primarily due to the build-up of pathogens in either the soil or on crop residues. If pathogen populations are too high, then the losses can be very substantial from soybean cyst nematode (SCN), frogeye leaf spot and Sclerotinia white mold. There are several cases in Ohio, where low levels of a particular disease were found in a field at the end of one growing season and the same variety was then planted back into the same field the following year, which resulted in an outbreak of disease and greatly reduced yields.

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Ohio No-Till Field Day Talks Cover Crop Application

The Ohio No-Till Field Day was full of talk on cover crops. David Eby of Agri Flite (above) explained aerial application of cover crops to the group. He says using an airplane is the quickest and easiest way to get the seed on the ground, but timing is the key to making it successful. Some of the advantages include: no compaction or wheel tracks, accurate application, uniform coverage, no manpower and your able to apply over corn. He is partnering with cooperatives in Western Ohio who have begun to use this method.

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Will prices peak early for corn and soybeans?

The 2011-12 corn and soybean marketing years will be characterized by the need to reduce consumption of both crops, but the magnitude of those needed reductions are not yet known and the prices needed to make those cuts will depend on the strength of underlying demand, said University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good.

“Based on the most recent USDA projections and the assumption that year-ending stocks need to be maintained at or above 5% of consumption, corn use would need to be reduced by only about 30 million bushels, or 0.2%, during the year ahead. Soybean consumption would need to be reduced by 122 million bushels, or 3.7%,” Good said.

The actual reductions needed will depend on the final consumption estimates for the 2010-11 marketing year, the magnitude of old crop inventories on Sept. 1, and the size of the 2011 harvest, he said.

“Unfolding evidence suggests that the 2011 U.S.

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Morrow County Fair and the chick magnet

Apparently, when you marry a talented and beautiful Ohio Lamb and Wool Queen, occasionally judging Guys and Gals Lead Competitions is part of the deal. This is not something I recall from our marriage vows but I am told that this was indeed in there somewhere.

At any rate, my wife and I had the chance to visit the Morrow County Fair this week to serve as judges for the Guys and Gals Sheep Lead competition and had a great time visiting the fair. While the poise of the young ladies and their fine outfits were the highlight for most spectators, I have to say that Dale Morris was one of the real highlights for me. The three-year-old donned a bright yellow, feathery chicken costume complete with floppy chicken feet shoes. The sheep he led for the competition had what looked to be a giant magnet around its neck as they circled the show ring.

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Clean water is a priority for Poultry Environmental Steward

By Matt Reese

To do his part to prevent any sediment or nutrients from leaving the farm, Paul Dahlinghaus of Auglaize County has really stepped up the participation in EQIP on his dairy, turkey and hog farm. With his brother, he farms 600 acres and has continued his family’s tradition of dairy farming with milking 65 to 70 cows. Dahlinghaus also has added a contract hog finishing barn and a contract turkey finishing barn with Cooper Farms. Dahlinghaus is this year’s Poultry Environmental Stewardship winner, presented by the Ohio Poultry Association and Ohio Livestock Coalition.

“We put in some new waterways and one thing led to another,” he said. “We knew we had to keep improving.”

One of the first things they addressed on the farm was the milk house wastewater three years ago.

“We put in a two-step system of two septic tanks. A tile runs into a septic tank to filter solids, then it goes into a second empty tank,” Dahlinghaus said.

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Farm women share their message through CommonGround

Thanks to a program called CommonGround, three Ohio farm women are sharing their personal stories and experiences about farming and the food it provides.

“The lack of knowledge about America’s agricultural system has caused some confusion and distrust among people who are concerned about feeding their families safe, healthy food,” said Rachel Heimerl, CommonGround volunteer from Licking County. “As a mother myself, I understand their concerns. CommonGround is all about trying to rebuild the confidence in our food system.  To do that, we are working to show the commonalities between real farm families and consumers who benefit from all that farmers grow — to show there is, in fact, CommonGround.”

While it started as a national program, CommonGround is coordinated state-by-state. Ohio has now joined this movement and recently held a kickoff dinner August 11 at the historic Amelita Mirolo Barn in Upper Arlington.

Local business and community women leaders were invited to the dinner to have conversations about food and farming while enjoying a delicious meal of locally-produced foods.

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How was corn affected by the heat?

By Dave Nanda, Director of Genetics and Technology, Seed Consultants, Inc.

With the corn planted in late May and early June, at first we were all concerned about whether the corn will mature this year or not. Well that question has been answered by the streak of high temperatures we had in the Corn Belt during July and August, which produced a lot of growing degrees. Besides, you need fewer growing degrees for the late-planted corn to reach maturity. But now the question is, how yield would be affected by the heat? If you got rains with the heat, you will have decent yields with the late-planted corn. However, if you did not receive timely rains, the drought and heat could substantially reduce the yields.

Did the corn silks get well pollinated during the hot period? Pollination is rarely a problem because of the abundant pollen availability over the four- to five-day period.

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Farmers get up close look at Lake Erie algae issues


The Ottawa Soil and Water Conservation District held the “Lake Erie Ag Tour 2011.” With all the headlines about algal blooms on Ohio lakes the past two years, and farmers getting much of the blame, the goal of the tour was to get farmers on Lake Erie and let them see things firsthand. About 40 farmers, local homeowners and government officials participated. They traveled on Ohio State University research vessels to sample the lake’s water, then to Gilbralter Island, home of OSU’s Stone Laboratory and Ohio Sea Grant Program, to analyze their samples. Read about the tour and what the group learned in the Mid-September issue of Ohio’s Country Journal.

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Day 4 Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour

On the fourth and final day of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour, the western and eastern legs of the Tour converged in Austin, Minnesota to compile the results. The touring agronomists found an average corn yield of 175.93 bushels per acre for Minnesota and 164.62 bushels per acre for Iowa. Pod counts in a 3’x3’ square totaled 1,124.20 pods in Minnesota and 1,221.94 pods in Iowa.

Jerome Lansing, Pioneer agronomist, found a dichotomy of a year in Mower County Minnesota.

“Growing conditions started out relatively wet during planting. Planting was drawn out-ranging from two weeks to six weeks in length. May held colder temperatures and July brought hot temperatures,” he reported. “Reduced solar radiation coupled with lack of rainfall with 5-6 weeks is why we speculate seeing some kernel abortion in corn. Right now crops are at a standstill with moisture, and we’re seeing shallower kernel depth due to lack of moisture.

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Increased scrutiny offers chance showcase conservation

 

By Matt Reese

There are few places more scrutinized than a livestock farm in the Grand Lake St. Marys Watershed, which has captured national attention with its toxic algae horror stories. There is no question that a problem exists and, right or wrong, the blame often falls animal agriculture in the Watershed.

“We’re 3 miles from the lake and we live on a major state highway, so people watch us pretty closely,” said Lou Brown, who runs Brownhaven Dairy with his brother Alan. “The town people are very upset about farmers polluting their lake and they will tell you about it.”

But rather than try to avoid all of the unwanted attention directed at animal agriculture in the area, this year’s Dairy Environmental Steward Award winner, presented by the Ohio Livestock Coalition and Ohio Dairy Producers Association, welcomes the chance to show others the extensive measures that have been taken on the farm to benefit the environment, including the notorious waters of Grand Lake St.

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Pro Farmer Crop Tour- Day 3

Day three of the Pro Farmer Crop Tour finished Illinois and went through part of Iowa.

On the eastern leg Illinois corn averaged 155.00 bushels per acre. The three year average is 166.88 bushels per acre. Soybeans had an average of 1,196.04 pods per three by three foot square.

Katie Micik of DTN saw fields ready to harvest in Mason County, Illinois. She said the the sandy soils allowed for early planting and the warmer temperatures sped up maturity.

Chip Flory of Pro Farmer reported corn in the Fremont County, Iowa area looked steamrolled and the some of the beans were hailed down to the stem. Final numbers from Iowa will be released on Thursday evening.

 

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John Deere has largest ever launch of new equipment

Today in Indianapolis, John Deere is unveiling its new ag equipment for 2012 as part of the largest, most significant product introduction in the company’s 174-year history. Significant improvements in power, comfort, and performance are the hallmarks of the new machines including the S-Series Combines with larger corn heads and platforms; high-horsepower 4WD and track 9R/9RT Tractors; 6R Series row-crop tractors and 5 Series utility and specialty tractors.

According to Barry Nelson, manager of media relations for John Deere Ag and Turf Division, these products greatly extend the company’s broad portfolio of equipment products for use in all types of farming, livestock and specialty crop operations, as well as for commercial and property maintenance businesses.

Nelson visits with Ty Higgins about Wednesday’s product unveiling.

JD Barry Nelson

In addition to new John Deere combines, headers and tractors, the company recently introduced its new 7R Series Tractors for the row-crop market; its largest, most advanced self-propelled 4940 Sprayer with 1,200-gal.

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Day Two of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour

Today’s eastern leg of the 2011 Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour went from Fishers, Indiana to Bloomington, Illinois. The western leg of the Tour moved from Grand Island, Nebraska, to Nebraska City, Nebraska.
In Indiana, the corn yield average was 143.1 bushels per acre, well below the three-year average of 162.74. The soybean pod count in three square feet was 1,137.56 pods, also below the 3-year average of 1,244.
Pioneer agronomist Mike Hellmer said that, with all the stress this year, ear shanks and stalks will likely be as weak. The next few weeks are the best time to evaluate the stalk strength. Hellmer was also surprised to find some diplodia ear mold in some hybrids despite the limited moisture. This is probably due to the stressful conditions during pollination and the heavy dews in the morning.
The corn in Nebraska had an average yield of 153.7 bushels per acre, which is just above the three-year average of 152.98 bushels.

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Between the Rows-August 22nd

“That June corn looks respectable considering the conditions. I checked some of the pollination and it looks decent. There are no zipper ears that I could find, and I moved around through the field quite a bit.

“We got those showers, not any big rains, and we got cooler weather, which really helped. It is not going to be too far off of nor- mal, I think. The May corn, though, is probably only 50% of normal yield. It is extremely short, uneven and hurting.“The worst parts of the county are on our west end where we are and the southeast part. Last week around Sherwood, about 5 miles from us, got 2 to 4 inches. We could see it from our house. We just didn’t get it. Then, in the southeast around Ayersville, it is terrible and the beans are really short.

“Our beans are short and we have sprayed at least 80% of our beans for either aphids or spider mites.

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Pro Farmer Crop Tour kicks off in Ohio

Aug. 22 kicked off the four-day Pro Farmer Midwest Crop tour where expert agronomists start on opposite ends of the Corn Belt and work their way to the center, evaluating crops along the way. The tour began with Pioneer agronomist Justin Welch heading up the Eastern Route with teams in Columbus, Ohio and Pioneer account manager Tim Lewandowski who started in Revenna, Nebraska. On day four, both routes converge on Austin, Minnesota where notes from the span of the Corn Belt will be compared, compiled and shared.

There were around 12 teams working their way through Ohio’s crop fields on the first day of the tour. John Leighty, with Trupointe, was with a team that visited fields in 18 counties in western and northwestern Ohio.

“We saw a crop that still has a long way to go. It is a crop that would still benefit with more rain and a crop that will be reduced substantially if it turns off dry for the rest of the summer,” Leighty said.

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Rocking the Defiance County Fair

By Matt Reese

In the past, when there was a major event really rocking the grandstand at the Defiance County Fair, the grandstand was really rocking, and not is a positive way.

“The stands creaked and groaned. People were actually scared to go in them, and if you saw what it looked like underneath them, you’d have been scared too,” said Earl Klepper, Defiance County Fair Board member. “It was around 135 years old and it was on its last legs. It had been condemned by the state multiple times and every year we were trying to patch up the old grandstands.”

The aged structure with hand-hewn beams held together with pegs had plenty of memories tied to it, but it was time for it to go according to Klepper and many in the community.

To quantify the growing concern about the old grandstand, the Defiance County Fair Foundation took a community poll to determine where to focus their fund raising efforts.

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Will the corn crop mature?

By Dave Nanda, Director of Genetics and Technology, Seed Consultants, Inc.
Corn growth is driven by heat units or growing degree days (GDDs). The corn hybrids used in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky range in relative maturity of 105 to 117 days or 2,400 to 2,900 GDDs. We subtract 50 from the average daily temperature to get the GDDs for each day, with the limitation that if the low temperature falls below 50 degrees F, we use 50 as low. If the temperature goes above 86, we use 86 as the high for that day. By adding the GDDs of each day from planting to physiological maturity or “black layer” (about 32% grain moisture), gives us the growing degrees needed by the hybrid. The Black layer is a very thin line, which is formed at the tip of the kernel at physiological maturity, after which no more dry matter goes into the kernels and the process of dry-down begins.

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