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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 98 | Sending help to Nebraska

Rose Hartschuh joins Matt and Joel for the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, brought to you by AgriGold. They’re talking the relief efforts by Ohio farmers to Nebraska though Ohio’s Rural America Relief.

Other guests include Muskingum Co. Pork Producer Matt Bell, Grain Merchandiser Jon Scheve, Laura Lindsey from OSU Extension on Barley, and Chris Baker of the Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation. Tune in!

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How has flooding impacted grain markets?

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

It would seem that the market hasn’t really reacted to the massive flooding throughout the Midwest. This is likely because the amount grain affected, currently estimated at $500 million in Nebraska alone, is relatively small. While that sounds large, the total U.S. corn crop is valued at about $60 billion and the bean crop at $40 billion. So, losses may only total about 1% of the crop across the entire Midwest.

About 13% of ethanol production was estimated to have been halted last week. But that demand is small, 2 million bushels per day, relative to the estimates of what have been lost so far of maybe 250 million bushels of corn. However, if those plants stay off line for more than a couple months then the issue could become a bigger problem. Unfortunately, that lack of demand can’t be made up. It’s lost forever because most plants were running at near full capacity.

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The importance of documenting loan receivables from a tax perspective

By Brian E. Ravencraft

If you have ever purchased a farm, a house, a tractor, or any other item that required financing, you know that there are many documents that must be signed when financing a purchase. Chances are you have signed documents with all kinds of terms related to principal amounts, interest rates, due dates and penalties. Although reading these documents can be somewhat terrifying, especially when reading the penalty provisions, these documents serve a purpose.

For farming businesses that make loans to other family member or customers, these documents are the legal proof that establishes that they are entitled to money and how they are to be repaid. When a business goes to court to get a judgment against someone who has not paid them, they are expected to produce those documents to prove that they are owed money from a specific person. And the truth is we would not have it any other way.

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What’s a picture worth? The time is now to share your story

By Matt Reese

A few weeks back I got nominated to do this “farming family challenge.” I groaned out loud at the thought of it. Basically, the challenge required that I post an image on Facebook every day for 10 days showcasing farm life without any explanation.

This challenge was posed during the very busy stretch of mid- to late-winter meetings. A 10-day picture posting challenge on social media was not a welcome addition to the already heavy work load that time of year. I issued forth another audible groan later that night when I opened up the “Reese” file on my laptop and began sorting through many family and farm pictures. I surely didn’t have time for this.

About an hour later, though, my mood had changed. I’d gone from sort of grumpy to a bit misty-eyed as I scrolled through pictures highlighting generations of my family, many showcasing work on the farm.

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Ways to make a buck on soybeans for 2019

By Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension agronomist

Planting date was the biggie. We had our annual Soybean School at the Conservation Tillage Conference recently. Three of our speakers said that planting date was the most important item that growers could change to improve yield. Plant in April if possible or early May if not.

Last year in this column I noted that Fred Below crop physiologist from the University of Illinois at Commodity Classic said the number one influence on soybean yields is the weather. I do have to agree with that — just look at 2018 and you will see how great this influence is.

Variety selection? From Fred’s list of last year, I think genetics is number two (although he did not put it at the same ranking). In looking over the soybean varieties entered in Ohio’s 2018 Soybean Performance trials (http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/soy2018/) — there are big swings. Averaged across two sites from 2018 at central Ohio trials for late maturity the highest yielder is 61.7 bushels per acre and the low is 44.8.

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Strange bedfellows in border wall suit

By Leisa Boley Hellwarth, a dairy farmer and attorney near Celina

In his play The Tempest, William Shakespeare said it best: “Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.”

That is an apt description of the various plaintiffs who have filed suit against Trump’s emergency declaration regarding the border wall. California and 15 other states (Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon and Virginia), the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union), Public Citizens (a liberal watch dog group) and Texas landowners (typically conservative farmers and ranchers that are supportive of the current administration).

The first lawsuit challenging the emergency declaration was filed on Feb. 15, 2019 by four plaintiffs — three landowners from Starr County, Texas and the Frontera Audubon Society. These plaintiffs object to the process that the President used to gain the funding after Congress largely denied it to him.

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2019 Ohio Beef Expo recap

In another incredible event focused on the beef industry, the 2019 Ohio Beef Expo drew more than 30,000 participants to Columbus from March 14 to 17.

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) hosts the annual event that provides opportunities for beef producers to learn and enhance their operations through a multi-day trade show, cattle sales, youth events and quality assurance sessions.

The event this year was accompanied by some positive signs for the beef industry.

“Today’s cattle industry is good despite the mud. The markets are looking good. The grass is starting to come and feeder cattle are trending up, fat cattle are trending up and so are cull cattle,” said Sasha Rittenhouse, OCA president. “The Ohio Beef Expo is the largest event for the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association. It was huge this year.”

One highlight for Youth Day on Friday — sponsored by the Gallia County Cattlemen’s Association and the Fayette County Cattle Feeders — was the judging contest, where over 560 youth tested their ability to evaluate cattle.

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Prepare for 2019 spring fertilizer applications

By John Fulton and Trey Colley, Ohio State University Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering

We are moving into spring work quickly here in 2019, including the application of fertilizer. Whether fixed- or variable-rate fertilizer application, it is important that proper maintenance, setup and calibration of spreaders is carried out. Annual calibration is necessary for accurate and uniform application of fertilizers.

While technology on spreaders, especially variable-rate technology (VRT) spreaders, has significantly increased in the last 10 years, the technology being adopted does not directly correlate to accurate field performance. Crop yield can potentially be impacted if incorrect rates are applied or non-uniform application occurs. There are a number of variables that impact the quality of dry fertilizer application, which includes the operator, fertilizer source properties, applicator and conditions during application. Here are a few notes to consider as we approach spring with work related to making sure the right source is accurately placed at the right rate.

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The challenges of still having unsold 2017 corn

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

Wheat’s massive drop was most likely the cause for the decline in corn and beans the past couple of weeks. Large hedge funds often have positions in all three commodities, so if they were selling one, they might be selling all three.

In the last 30 days, wheat, corn, and beans had significant decreases with moderate rebounds last week:

  • Wheat decreased $1 per bushel then recovered 20 cents
  • Corn decreased 25 cents per bushel then recovered 14 cents
  • Beans decreased 45 cents per bushel then recovered 20 cents

This week’s recovery could make technical traders think prices have found a low. If so, they may consider re-ownership or short covering of recent sales in the futures market, which could help prices trend higher.

 

I’ve noticed a few analysts and advisors who still have 10% to 25% of their 2017 corn unpriced. One advisor was suggesting that farmers price remaining ‘17 unsold corn if July ’19 futures hit $4.

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 97 | Farm Bureau to D.C., Ohio Beef Expo, and Ohio Ag Week

This episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, brought to you by AgriGold, hears from Senators Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown as well as American Farm Bureau’s Paul Lyon. The crew also hears from Bruce Smith of COBA/Select Sires during the recent Ohio Beef Expo, plus agronomist Mike Hannewald taking a look at the phosphorous problem from a soil health perspective.

Tune in!

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Ohio’s senators weigh in on the changing climate

By Matt Reese

There is no doubt about it: 2018 was wet. It was the third wettest year on record and farmers should prepare for more soggy situations moving forward. At the recent Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference in Ada, Ohio State University climate specialist Aaron Wilson said temperatures are also on the rise and more rain is not coincidental. The warmer conditions lead to a greater amount of water vapor in the atmosphere and increased rainfall potential. Farmers are acutely aware of the situation; so are politicians.

This week in Washington, D.C. there was also plenty of talk about the changing climate as legislators considered the Green New Deal resolution spearheaded by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.). The much-discussed Green New Deal brought “cow farts” into the national political debate and strives for net-zero greenhouse gas emissions in the United States and the creation of jobs. Estimates suggest the Green New Deal could cost anywhere from around $50 trillion to over $90 trillion between 2020 and 2029 in addition to a wide array of potential societal costs.

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Gov. DeWine outlines H2Ohio water quality initiative

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine outlined his H2Ohio water quality initiative, which he is introducing as part of his proposed budget for the 2020-2021 biennium.

“Water is vital to everyone, yet communities throughout the state face real and different challenges, such as algae blooms, failing septic tanks, nutrient pollution, and threats of lead contamination,” Governor DeWine said. “We cannot continue to lurch from water crisis to water crisis. I am proposing an H2Ohio initiative that would allow us to invest in targeted, long-term solutions to ensure safe and clean water across the state of Ohio.”

During an event in Toledo, Governor DeWine announced that his proposal would create a special H2Ohio Fund that would be used to protect Ohio’s water quality over 10 years and could amount to approximately $900 million.

“Rather than borrowing to pay to fix our water problems, we want to create a special account, where we can deposit funds to be used specifically for water quality across Ohio,” Gov.

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A first-generation farm’s success

By Kayla Hawthorne, OCJ field reporter

In 2012 Brad and Mindy Thornburg bought 11 Angus-Simmental cross cows “sight unseen” through a deal with a friend. Thornburg Cattle was an adventure from the start of the first-generation farm near Barnesville in Belmont County, but they expected nothing less. They have battled through numerous challenges since then and their resulting success was highlighted in January when Brad was named the Young Cattleman of the Year by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association.

The Young Cattleman of the Year Award is presented to individuals or couples, typically under 40 years of age, who have demonstrated the initial stages of a successful beef operation and exhibited leadership potential. The recipient is also the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s automatic nominee to participate in the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Young Cattlemen’s Conference held in early February.

The Thornburgs have worked hard to make their own way in the cattle business, but have relied heavily on the insight and expertise from others in the industry.

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Ohio Farm Bureau county presidents’ trip highlights trade and farm economy

By Matt Reese

Ohio Farm Bureau’s county presidents flooded Capitol Hill this week with their message of how farms in Ohio — and their farms specifically — are impacted with federal policy decisions.

“It is so easy for all of us to take our food system and agricultural industry for granted. It is so important here at Capitol Hill for our farmer leaders to come out and tell their stories to help educate the leaders here in Washington about the challenges facing Ohio agriculture and what is happening on our farms,” said Jack Irvin, with the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF). “Having that personal story makes it so much more real than some white piece of paper that has a bunch of facts listed on it. When you have a real-life person telling a real-life story, it is something you can remember and understand a lot more easily than some generic talking point from a generic lobbyist.”

The county presidents start the trip with an overview of the policy issues from the experts before meeting with legislators.

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Are there reasons to be optimistic for corn prices?

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

The last USDA report lowered export demand by 75 million bushels, most likely due to the anticipated large corn crops in South America and Ukraine. Unlike the U.S. though, these countries lack adequate storage, which means their corn is priced to move when it is harvested and it will compete with U.S. supply.

The USDA also reduced the ethanol grind by 25 million. The recent price set-back, could help ethanol plants’ margins and allow for the grind to remain steady going forward.

On a positive note, feed usage wasn’t reduced any further in this report. Some say the long cold winter is causing lower feed efficiency, so some expect feed demand to be adjusted higher down the road. While others in the trade think the much lower wheat prices will encourage end users to replace corn with more wheat in the rations. I’m not sure this will happen though, given wheat’s relatively good carry and strong basis most of the year will keep much of the wheat out of feed.

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The pulse of the kitchen

By Shelly Detwiler, berry farmer and dietician

I live with a dairy farmer and meat and milk are usually what’s for dinner at our house. However, I think for one meal a week, or better yet a serving daily, all us carnivores can think outside the box and enjoy beans and legumes, or pulses as they are called these days. Pulses are the edible seeds grown in pods that are harvested dry. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recognizes 11 types of pulses: dry beans, dry broad beans, dry peas, chickpeas, cow peas, pigeon peas, lentils, Bambara beans, vetches, lupins and pulses nes (which is everything not in a before mentioned group).

Experts will say they are environmentally friendly and sustainable. Those hot trendy terms are not why I like to recommend them. Pulses are low fat and high in fiber with plenty of protein. Research has shown that eating a half-cup to three-quarters of a cup of pulses per day can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol.

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Hey Toledo: The lake don’t care

By Matt Reese

There is no doubt the people of Toledo care about Lake Erie — and they should — though it could be argued that some of this caring is misguided and counterproductive. This is certainly the case with the recently Toledo-voter approved, and fairly bizarre, Lake Erie Bill of Rights (LEBOR). I do believe that no small amount of genuine caring went into the effort to get LEBOR passed, but I am also pretty certain that Lake Erie itself most definitely does not care.

Now with a Bill of Rights like a person, Lake Erie (whether it cares or not) can take legal action against parties who could damage it.

“[The lake] now has legal rights, but they would say that the lake is an indefensible entity, so therefore it needs help defending itself. Help is granted to the lake by passing the LEBOR law and allowing the citizens of Toledo to come to the lake’s defense as a legal entity,” said John Torres, with the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

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