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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 153 | Ohio FFA Celebration Week

The Quarantine Chronicles take the virtual stage for the Ohio FFA Celebration with the help of our 2020 FFA Student Reporters, Halle Miller, Jacob Zajkowski, and Elizabeth Fannin. Interviews this week include a group interview from intern Madi Kregel with the Oak Harbor Penta FFA chapter officers and their advisor. Matt has three interviews this week with Cheryl Day, Chris Henney, and Miles VonStein. And Kolt brings an interview with President of the Marion County fair, after they announced the cancelation of their fair.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 151 | Pork Panel and Ag Education

The Quarantine Chronicles continue this week with Matt, Kolt, Dusty, and Dale hosting. Earlier in the week, Matt talked to Jim Heimerl and Duane Stateler about some issues within the pork industry currently. Dale brought two interviews this week featuring Erin Wollett from the Cardington Lincoln FFA chapter, and Jenny Tower, Wilmington College Senior Admissions Councelor. Our fearless leader Bart brought an interview with Donnie Kelch from Bane Welker to the podcast this week.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 150 | Sesquicentennial Podcast plus four h’s

It is the 150th Ohio Ag Net Podcast, and while we here at OCJ wish we could celebrate together, we are happy to be talking about 4-H youth giving back to essential workers this week! Matt, Kolt, and intern Madi host the podcast from their homes with guest Jenny Morlock from the Wood County 4-H Extension. Jenny talks about Wood County’s recent program that has 4-H’ers and their families around the state sending appreciation to all essential workers with the hashtag, #4Happreciatesyou. This week begins the 2020 between the rows, which brings two interviews to the podcast this week featuring Willy Murphey from Clinton County, and Jake Hellman from Lucas County. And we have a market outlook for the week from Ben Brown.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 148 | Farming and Businesses during COVID-19

It’s week two of the OCJ Quarantine Chronicles. Matt and Kolt host remotely again this week and discuss COVID-19 and H2Ohio. While this podcast was recorded, ODA announced that the H2Ohio extended sign up had been removed, the sign up deadline is March 31st once again. Interviews this week include Jack Irvin with Ohio Farm Bureau on the topic COVID-19 and the stimulus package. Dave Russell is back on the podcast with and interview featuring Ben Brown about the stimulus package as well. Matt talks to Larry Goodman from the Marion, Ohio Rural King about running a business during COVID-19 and providing for the essential farmers. Matt also interviews Andrew Gladden with Lucky Farmers in North West Ohio about phosphorus reduction and H2Ohio.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 146 |COVID-19, Agriculture, and Other

Matt, Bart, and Kolt keep it hygienic while they talk about the Corona Virus (COVID-19)and it’s impact on agriculture and our world as a whole. Dave Russell is in this week’s podcast with interviews featuring American Farm Bureau Chief Economist Dr. John Newton, and Ted McKinney from the USDA. And we continue our interviews from Commodity Classic with an interview between Bart and some representatives at Agrigold!… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 143 | Commodity Classic and NRCS

Matt and Dale run the podcast this week with a full list of topics! Matt made a trip down to San Antonio for the Commodity Classic where he had a round table discussion with the president of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association, Patty Mann, and the president of the Ohio Soybean Association, Ryan Rhoades. He also sat down with Emilie Regula Hancock from the Ohio Soybean Association, and Luke Cromly from the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association. Matt also met up with the NRCS Cheif, Matt Lohr, after he finished speaking to other soil and water districts within the state. And last but not least, Dale caught up with Locus AG at Commodity Classic.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast |Ep. 140| The Ractopamine Saga Continues

Kolt and Dale open this weeks podcast with Melissa Bell from the Ohio Pork Council, as Ractopamine remains a hot topic. Matt talks to Dr. Steve Moller, who weighs in on the topic, and Kolt talks to Dr. Zach Rambo about what Ractopamine is and what it does. Matt sat down with the Young Cattleman of the Year, Luke Vollborn, and talked about his business and the cattle industry.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 137 | Paylean-Palooza

Paylean Palooza is underway as Matt, Dale and Kolt discuss what fairs are expecting for the future. Bart gets insight from Dr. Todd Price on the topic. Matt sits down with Kurt Theide about the new Navigable Water Protection rule. Dave talks to Dee Anders from the Ronald McDonald house at the Clark County Cattle Battle.… Continue reading

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A look back at 2019 Crop Tour numbers

By Matt Reese

Rewind back to mid-August of 2019 when two groups from Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net took to the back roads of the state to take a peek at the yield potential following arguably the worst planting season in the state’s history. The 2019 Ohio Crop Tour was sponsored by AgroLiquid.

Of course, we found many fields (particularly in northwest Ohio) that were very late developmentally. This made estimating yields for the fields quite challenging. The corn yield potential was there in many fields, but the crop was in great need of a late frost and steady rainfall throughout the rest of the growing season to come close to achieving the yield potential we were seeing. Guess what happened…

Here is what we wrote at the end of the 2019 I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour on Aug. 15: For corn, the average yield for the East was 175 bushels per acre, the average for the West was 167 bushels per acre and the overall average was 171 bushels.Continue reading

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Compaction: Where the rubber meets the road

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

It can be said that compaction occurs where the rubber meets the road, or in this case, the rubber meets the soil.

“If you think about how roads are designed and built, they are constructed to handle heavy loads. It comes down to a function of the axle weight,” said Ian McDonald, researcher from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture. “Why do we think it is alright to put heavy axle weight on top of a biological ecosystem?”

In research conducted at Bern University by Matthias Stettler, it suggests that the axel load on equipment in a field should ideally be less than 5 tons per axle and tire inflation pressure should ideally be less than 15 pounds per square inch. Common field equipment axle loads are 7.5 tons per axle for a 200 horsepower 4-wheel-drive tractor, 13 tons per axle for a 325 horsepower 4-wheel-drive tractor, 24 tons per axle for a combine with a 12-row head, and 35 to 40 tons per axle for a 1200-bushel grain cart.

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Soil compaction, choices and patience

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Management requires measurement. There are two forms of soil compaction that can be measured and then managed, said John Fulton, associate professor at the Ohio State University in Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering at the recent Precision University 2020 meeting.

“To effectively manage compaction we need to both understand it and measure it. The first is surface compaction. This is the compaction that occurs at the upper soil layer.  It is considered to be within the tilled layer of soil. The second is subsoil or deep compaction. Subsoil compaction occurs below the tilled layer as a result of surface loading,” Fulton said. “There are four stages when dealing with compaction issues. They include: identifying areas of soil compaction,evaluating those compacted areas to determine both the cause and also severity, making plans to prevent future compaction, and developing plans to manage existing compaction.”

John Fulton, Associate Professor, Biosystems Engineering, The Ohio State University

Soil compaction can be defined as soil particles being compressed together and reducing the pore space.… Continue reading

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More land and bigger tractors: Can farmers produce enough to feed Phase One?

By Matt Reese

Can the farmers of the United States produce enough? That is a question being asked as the Trump Administration finalized the Phase One trade deal with China for purchase of $80 billion in agricultural products over the next 2 years and Congress works through the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement that would also have huge export implications for U.S. agriculture.

President Donald Trump talked about this issue last fall at a rally in Louisiana.

“They said, can we make it 20 [billion dollars]? We don’t think our farmers can produce that much. I said, ‘Make it 50. Our farmers will buy more land and they’ll buy bigger tractors.’…They said to me, ‘We can’t produce that much wheat and corn and all the stuff.’ Because I want to tell you, I got China to order a lot,” Trump said to a cheering crowd of supporters last October as his Administration was in the process of negotiating Phase One.… Continue reading

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Phase One makes progress, still comes up short with Chinese trade

When President Donald Trump signed the first phase of a trade deal with China on Jan. 15, U.S. agriculture was pleased with the promise of nearly $40 billion in farm product purchases by China in 2020.

“The signing of a trade deal with China is a big step in the right direction as farmers in Ohio and across the country are eager to get back to business globally,” said Frank Burkett, Ohio Farm Bureau president. “Restoring our ability to be competitive in China is welcome news for U.S. agriculture and we encourage the Administration to continue building on its success in a Phase One deal and aggressively pursue a full trade agreement with China.”

Over the next two years U.S. trade officials said China will spend $80 billion purchases of agricultural products from the United States, with the amount projected to be slightly below $40 billion in 2020 and slightly above $40 billion in 2021.… Continue reading

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USDA observations

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

The Jan. 10 USDA report wasn’t as big of a market mover as some expected. Corn and beans closed only up 2 cents after the report. Following are some highlights.

 

Planted and harvested acres

A surprise was the USDA reducing planted and harvested acres slightly for 2018 as well as 2019. However, the difference in harvested acres between the 2 years was still less than a 1-million-acre reduction.

 

Yields

Probably a bigger surprise was that yields were increased by 1 bushel per acre instead of a slight reduction. The USDA announced they will resurvey 5 northern states in the spring, it seems unlikely the national yield average would increase from those unharvested acres. Therefore, a carryout reduction is still possible later this year.

 

Total production

After taking into considering the acre reduction for both crop years, there was only a slight increase of 50 million bushels in total production with the surprise yield increase.… Continue reading

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Limits on business interest expense deductions

By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA, Partner at Holbrook & Manter, CPAs

One provision of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) that has generated considerable concern among business owners is the new limitation on deductions for business interest expenses.

Prior to the provision, interest paid on business loans or credit lines could be deducted as an ordinary business expense. One section of the Internal Revenue Code — Section 163(j) —limited the deductions for certain types of interest expense that some C corporations paid, but most businesses were able to fully deduct business interest expense in the year it was accrued or paid.

The TCJA significantly changed that. The act expanded Section 163(j) to apply to all types of business interest expense, and it broadened the section’s scope to encompass all businesses, including pass-through entities such as partnerships, S corporations, and sole proprietorships.

Fortunately, many businesses — particularly small businesses — are still exempt from the Section 163(j) limitation.… Continue reading

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2020 Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Conference

The Ohio Forages and Grasslands Council Annual Conference will be held Feb. 21, 2020 from 8:30 am to 3:00 pm at the Ohio Department of Agriculture in Reynoldsburg, Ohio. The program theme is “Foraging for profit.” The Keynote speaker will be Jimmy Henning, Forage Professor, University of Kentucky, who will discuss “Making good round bale silage” based on extensive research and experience in Kentucky. Henning will also be speaking on a second topic, “The clover dilemma: Do I have enough to withhold N fertility.”

Another featured speaker to address new fencing technologies is Tony Parker, associate professor, Ohio State University Animal Science, speaking on “Current and future technologies for grazing animal management.”

Several producer talks will also be presented which includes beef producer Jonathan Berger from Wooster, Ohio, dairy producer, Jeff Miller from Winesburg, Ohio, stored forages producers, Miles and Caleb vonStein from Jenera, Ohio and sheep producer, Brady Campbell from Waterford, Ohio.… Continue reading

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How recent corn losses will impact Brazilian exports in 2020?

The new year has started with crop woes in Brazil. No, I am not talking about soybeans, my favorite subject here and everywhere. I am talking about corn – the first corn crop, which has been damaged by hot, dry conditions in some southern producing areas.
And now you might be questioning whether a crop failure in Brazil could result in weaker exports here and, consequently, in more sales of US corn in 2020. That is a fair question. But the answer is no. The problems that Brazil’s first corn crop faces right now will not impact Brazilian exports.
As I have already explained a few weeks ago right here in this column, Brazil grows three corn crops a year. The first crop is harvested from January to May and represents about 25% of Brazilian total corn production. It is grown in states where weather conditions do not allow a second corn crop – which is planted from January to March, right after the soybean harvest.
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