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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 114 | Soaking up the sun with solar panels and ice cold milk

The 114th episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, includes hosts Joel Penhorwood, Dale Minyo, and Kolt Buchenroth. On today’s podcast, Joel and Dale discuss the growing interest of solar technology with Eli Mast of Mast Farm Service and Sheldon Stutzman of Paradise Energy Solutions. Joel talks with Kelsey Turner from the Ohio Farm Bureau about the Young Ag Professionals Event and how to participate. The podcast has interviews from Kyle Vantillburg and Jetse Boersma on MVP Dairy where they talk with Matt Reese about the farm and the dairy industry. Matt gets an update from the Between the Rows farmers Dylan Baer and Nathan Brown and the boys guess this year’s Ohio State Fair butter sculpture.

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Keeping watch on the great French rooster battle

By Leisa Boley Hellwarth, a dairy farmer and attorney near Celina

Allen Ginsberg, the American poet, philosopher and writer, offered the following observation about France: “You can’t escape the past in France, and yet what’s so wonderful about it is that the past and present intermingle so intangibly that it doesn’t seem to burden.” That statement pretty much describes how the French, at least many of them, value their rural heritage.

Saint-Pierre-D’Oleron, France, is a village of 6,000 on the island of Oleron, off the West Coast of the country. Research indicates that it is quaint, picturesque and agrarian. Fifteen years ago, Jean-Louis Biron and Joelle Andrieux, a couple from Limoges (city of 137,000 in Southwestern Central France known for its decorated porcelain) built a vacation home in Saint-Pierre-D’Oleron because of the tranquility the island offered.

Apparently Jean-Louis and Joelle did not get the memo about France valuing its agrarian roots.

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Crop insurance deferral considerations

By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA, Partner at Holbrook & Manter, CPAs

As I have stated in other articles, weather here in Ohio can be quite fickle and the 2019 planting has taken the cake. While certain areas may still flourish, other areas will have poor (or no) production or be deemed disaster areas. Those not so lucky may be receiving crop insurance proceeds later in 2019. If you believe you may receive crop insurance proceeds this year , before you file your tax return, you might want to consider the following.

Deferral of certain crop insurance and disaster income proceeds

Typically, most farmers are cash basis taxpayers and proceeds from the destruction or damage of crops is included in income in the year of receipt; however, federal law allows certain insurance proceeds to be deferred one year, if certain requirement are met.

Under a special provision, a farmer may elect to include crop insurance and disaster in income in the taxable year after the year of the crop loss if it’s the farmer’s practice to report income from the sale of the crop in a later year.  

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Farmer without arms an inspiration for others

By Joel Penhorwood, Ohio Ag Net

Andy Detwiler farms corn, soybeans and livestock alongside his family in Champaign County. He goes about daily work in all four seasons in what is an otherwise normal scene, except for one thing — Andy does all the things a normal farmer does without the use of arms.

“When I was two years old, I fell into a grain auger, I reached in for some wheat and it took my arms off,” he said, recounting the origin of his current situation. “About two weeks after that they said I started using my feet for stuff in the hospital. Now that’s what I’m doing. I’ve been using my feet for 45 years now.”

And use them he does. Earlier this year, Detwiler was featured in an Ohio Ag Net planting cab cam video. He easily opened the door to his tractor and planted the field with the full-sized machine.

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Are we being poisoned by glyphosate or is this an attorney-get-rich scheme?

By Don “Doc” Sanders

You probably have seen the television commercials of the law firm Moose & Moose (name changed to protect the guilty), encouraging you to sign up to get a payout for a family member who has non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), allegedly caused by Roundup. You know them, I’m sure. One has a cheap toupee. The other is like me — with his own hair, but old.

This seems to be another get-rich-quick scheme that law firms are leeching onto, to reach families who have a loved one newly-diagnosed with NHL cancer. Roundup, aka glyphosate, is a chemical herbicide that efficiently kills broadleaf weeds in crops. It has an unparalleled safety record.

It did, anyway, until 2015, when the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested that even though there was no evidence that glysophate was carcinogenic, it “might” cause cancer. This set the news media off, spreading the scare. Naturally, it also set off California regulators, who developed new rules for glyphosate, not because there was cancer evidence, but as a “precautionary principle.”

Nonetheless, glyphosate has been cleared of causing cancer by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Health Canada, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the German BfR, an agency dedicated to strengthening consumer health protection.

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The importance of a well-maintained machine: now apply this to you!

By Dee Jepsen

Regular equipment maintenance is an important part of good work practices. Without proper equipment, our work performance suffers. Equipment maintenance includes many activities, including inspections, replacements and adjustments. Learning how to apply these principles to our own lifestyle is also important for sustainability and improves our quality of life. For without a well-prepared body, we are not ready to face the workday.

This article addresses the health side of agricultural safety and health. A healthy workforce is an important aspect towards total workplace safety.

 

Two types of maintenance

The two types of equipment maintenance are routine maintenance and corrective maintenance. During routine maintenance activities we focus on preventing future problems. Several of these good practices include getting adequate sleep, eating a balanced diet, participating in the right type of exercise, and knowing a few stress control strategies.

Corrective maintenance is reacting to a faulty system, where things go wrong within the system or where parts need replaced.

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Ohio’s ever-changing climate, and its impact on farmers

By Zach Parrott, OCJ field reporter

Many farmers in the state have been struggling with incredibly wet conditions over the past couple of years driven by a changing climate. Both crop and livestock operations are having to make changes to adapt accordingly.

Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences atmospheric scientist Aaron Wilson pointed out that over the past 60 years, moisture levels in Ohio have been on the rise. The increased moisture in the atmosphere has caused Ohio’s temperatures to also change. Ohio’s temperature has increased roughly 2 degrees overall. From 1986 to 2016, summers in Ohio have become increasingly cooler and the winters are warmer. These changes have significant impacts on the state’s ag sector, resulting in rising human and livestock stress levels, pollination decreases, lower productivity and quality, increased weed pressure, increase in disease, and a higher potential risk of crop failure.

“When you have more moisture in the atmosphere it does three things,” Wilson said.

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 113 | Hot weather and Dale’s new shirts

The 113th episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, includes hosts Matt Reese, Kolt Buchenroth, and Bart Johnson. In today’s episode, the boys cover Dale Minyo’s fair visit to the Clinton County Fair. Dale speaks with Greta Grey about the ongoing events at the fair. Next is Matt’s interview with Caroline Winters who is showing her steers at the Ohio State Fair, but more importantly she is one of the helpers at the Deans Charity Steer Show. Finally, Matt gets another report from our Between the Rows farmer Dave Baer. Dave talks about the historical perspective on his farm, as well as another farm update.
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Overcoming Ohio’s forage fiasco

By Matt Reese

Like most every sector of Ohio agriculture, those feeding livestock are faced with serious challenges after persistent wet weather swamped pastures, killed alfalfa stands, and severely limited and delayed quality hay making opportunities.

Most of Ohio suffered from too much rain this spring, but the northwestern part of the state has been hardest hit. Gary Wilson from Hancock County is an Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council board member and past president of the American Forage and Grassland Council. Like many others in northwest Ohio, he is scrambling to keep his livestock eating.

“Forages are really short. Last winter a lot of the alfalfa was winter killed. I think it was a combination of a wet fall, cold winter, lack of snow, and there was heaving. People could see their tile lines sticking out like a sore thumb in the spring once everything greened up and there was no alfalfa there between the tile lines — that is not a good sign.

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Two Ohio wheat farmers leading the nation both near and far

By Joel Penhorwood

Though Ohio is not a top state for wheat production, the state continues to be a hotbed for national leaders in agriculture. A pair of farmers in Ohio have taken their wheat expertise to the national level this year as they each are currently serving as chairs of their national organizations.

Doug Goyings of Paulding and Rachael Vonderhaar of Camden are chair people of the U.S. Wheat Associates and Wheat Foods Council, respectively. They by no means selected an easy year for organization leadership in these groups as a multitude of issues face the industry nationwide, along with unique seasonal challenges here at home.

“I’m a fourth-generation farmer,” said Doug Goyings, chair of the U.S. Wheat Associates. “My great-great-grandpa, he came here in 1886 — actually the farmstead where my son lives now. I followed my grandfather’s, great-grandfather’s, and my father’s steps, and I’ve grown the farm considerably since then.

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Ticks close to home

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show

I know first-hand that the odds of getting bit by a tick and contracting a disease are getting higher each year in Ohio. Last month my wife had what she thought was a bruise on her stomach which, at the sight of the classic bullseye-shaped rash, I identified as the bite of a tick. I had interviewed Dr. Timothy McDermott, a veterinarian and Ohio State University extension educator in Franklin County, on my radio show and learned the signs.

“The incidence of Lyme disease locally has increased every year and is projected to continue to increase every year,” he explained, adding that in the past four years, the number of cases of Lyme disease nearly doubled, with 293 cases reported in 2018, according to Ohio Department of Public Health data. As of press time, there already were 27 cases statewide this year.

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USDA numbers neutral on July 11

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

What will USDA give us today? How will they affect my bottom line?

That is the gargantuan (adjective for the day) question farmers are asking. They continue to be in shock with the most surprising corn acres number provided with the June 28 Acres Report. This report had U.S. corn acres at 91.7 million acres while soybean acres were estimated at 80 million acres. What happened to prevent planted corn acres talked about for weeks ahead of that report? Corn acres were a huge bearish surprise, with December CBOT corn closing down 19 ½ cents at $4.31 ½ on the June 28 report day. Trader estimates ahead of the report estimated corn acres at 86-87 million acres. Soybean acres were a huge bullish surprise as the November CBOT soybeans closed at $9.23, up 10 ¾ cents that same day. Trader estimates had been 84 million acres.

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Tools for training and keeping good employees increasingly important in agribusiness

By Matt Reese

It is not an uncommon story. A young employee starts at the lowest levels of a company, works in every facet of the business and one day ends up running it.

“Our CEO is in his early 40s. He hired on at a local ag center as an applicator, which is a technical job driving big machines. He was willing to do anything. He would tie feed sacks at the mill, sweep shop floors, check out customers at the counter — that man now is our CEO,” said Lindsay Sankey, communications manager for Harvest Land Cooperative with locations in western Ohio and Indiana. “He has worked in every department of our business. He is a prime example that if you are willing to learn and take on responsibility, there is so much opportunity in a farmer owned cooperative. We have several examples of this. He started on the lowest rung and now he is leading the cooperative.”

Unfortunately, for a number of different reasons, this type of ground up experience and long-term company loyalty seems to be less common in the modern pool of employees.

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Ohio Farm Bureau News Update | July 10, 2019 | Cover crops on prevented plant acres, eminent domain ruling

Welcome to this week’s news roundup from Ohio Farm Bureau. Click here for our front page news and information.

If you’re a member, thank you for your support. Be sure to take advantage of all of your member benefits, including the updated Ohio Landowner Toolkit.

If you’re not a member (or need to renew your membership), this is your invitation to joinLearn more about membership or contact your county Farm Bureau.

Current News

Information about prevent plant acres, cover crops

The unprecedented lack of corn and soybean planting this spring has many farmers wondering just how they can utilize their prevent plant acres. Get answers about what you can and can’t do regarding planting corn, soybean and wheat seed on hand. Additionally, farmers who are struggling to make decisions about prevent plant, controlling weeds and potential cover crops should watch this recap of an informative discussion on those topics in Ada last week.

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Dean’s Charity Steer Show pairs celebrities with 4-H members in the show ring

By Matt Reese

Many people understand the excitement and appeal as the judge strolls down the line looking over the cattle to make a decision that will change the life of a young, hopeful exhibitor with the slap of his hand.

Cattle shows are, for some, a highlight of their year, through a large portion of the state’s population does not know a halter from a show stick. That will change for a few Ohio celebrities on July 30 with the inaugural Dean’s Charity Steer Show at 2:00 p.m. in the Voinovich Building at the Ohio State Fair. For the event, celebrity exhibitors — including some who never set foot in a show ring — will be paired with Ohio 4-H members to try their hand at showing a steer and vying for the judge’s eye.

The idea got started in a meeting with Cathann Kress, Dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and Leslie Bumgarner who sits on the board of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio.

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 112 | Health care tips, podcasters talk about podcasts, and DRY Weather

There’s a lot to talk about on this episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, covering the updates of our Between the Rows farmers about this dry weather and many more.

On this week’s podcast, hosts Matt Reese, Joel Penhorwood, Kolt Buchenroth, and Bart Johnson hear from our Between the Rows farmers, Andrew Armstrong, Nathan Brown, Dylan Baer, and Lamar Liming. They give us an update on their farms and how their regions of Ohio are trying to take advantage of this dry weather. We hear from our Feeding Farmer, Rob Wilson from Hardin County. Joel gets to talk with Matt Bane from the Plow Talk Podcast about their podcast. Finally, Matt talks with James Smith, who is with the Association Benefit Planners, about health care and some tips for Agribusinesses.

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Conditions improving (finally) around Ohio

Nathan Brown — Highland County

We have missed some of the rains but you don’t have to go very far north, south or west of us and they have caught a lot of the rains. We have been fortunate enough to get some dry spells and get some work accomplished. We got the wheat all run and got the straw baled. We should finish sidedressing today and finish post- spraying the corn and I will start post- spraying beans today too.

I haven’t gone across the scales yet but we are figuring that we’ll have really close to 90-bushel wheat. I think spraying fungicide and all of the extra tings we try to do really paid off. We had really low vomitoxin levels. The test weight was pretty good and it was pretty well dry. I think the wettest we came out of the field was 14.5%. We just shipped it straight to town.

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Fungicide applications to late planted crops

By John Schoenhals, Pioneer Field Agronomist in northern Ohio

Fungicide applications to corn and soybeans is an important management practice in an “average” year, but what about in 2019, a year

in which many corn and soybean acres were planted much later than normal? To answer this question, it is important to understand the role and function of fungicides.

Leaves serve as a “factory” for the plant, collecting sunlight and carbon dioxide to produce sugars used for grainfill. Healthy leaves produce sufficient amounts of sugars to meet grainfill needs as well as support plant health.

When plant diseases are present, the efficiency of this factory is reduced. If the demand for sugars is greater than what an unhealthy plant can produce, grain yield is reduced and overall plant health will rapidly decline as cannibalization of stalks takes place.

When fungicide applications occur, the leaf “factory” is protected from further disease development for a period of at least two to three weeks.

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