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Japan Prize goes to CFAES soil scientist Rattan Lal

Rattan Lal, a soil scientist at The Ohio State University, has been awarded the 2019 Japan Prize, considered one of the most prestigious honors in science and technology.

Lal is the first Ohio State scientist and the first soil scientist to ever receive the prize. He is Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The Japan Prize recognizes scientists and engineers from around the world for original and outstanding achievements that “not only contribute to the advancement of science and technology, but also promote peace and prosperity for all mankind,” the Japan Prize Foundation said Jan. 16 in announcing the award.

Lal, whose career in science spans five decades and five continents, was honored for his research on sustainable soil management and its role in improving global food security and mitigating climate change.

Global food security is a growing issue because Earth’s population is expected to increase to near 10 billion people by 2050.

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Wyandot Agronomy Day Jan. 29

By Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

Wyandot Agronomy day will be held on Jan. 29 from 9:00 to 3:30 at the Sycamore Community Center, 3498 St Rt 103, Sycamore Ohio 44882. Featured Presentations will include Dr. Pierce Paul presenting on Corn and Wheat Disease and Dr. Aaron Wilson on Todays Weather and Climate. Other presentations by local educators will cover all pesticide categories and fertilizer for recertification credits. The program includes lunch and will cost $50 including recertification credits if you wish to attend and do not need recertification credits the program will only cost $20. For more information and to register see the flier or call 419-562-8731

Topics include:

•Creating a herbicide program to match your farms needs

•Managing disease in forage crops

•Applying Nutrient management BMPS on your farm.

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Precision Ag Workshop with Pheasants Forever

The Precision Ag Workshop is a unique crossover event for conservation and agriculture at the 2019 National Pheasant Fest and Quail Classic on Friday Feb. 22 in Schaumburg, Ill. The workshop agenda is specifically designed for farmers, precision specialists, agronomists, and ag lenders. The topics on the agenda will help attendees discover new approaches to put data to work to maximize return on investment for every acre and how to harvest more bucks and birds. Continuing Education Units (CEU) are available for certified crop advisors. The $35 workshop registration gets attendees a 1-year Pheasants Forever membership, lunch, entry for Henry Golden Boy Farmer Edition Rifle, and a daily pass to National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic show floor going on in conjunction with the event.

Here are some highlights of the schedule:

10:15 Partnerships for Precision Farming

  • Howard Vincent, PF/QF President & CEO & Leadership From John Deere (TBA)

10:45 John Deere Operations Center: Turning Data into Decisions and ROI

  • Eric Taipale, CEO Sentera
  • Ed Barnes, Ph.D., Sr.
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AFBF sets 2019 policy

Farmer and rancher delegates to the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 100th Annual Convention adopted policies to guide the organization’s work during its centennial year on key topics such as farm bill implementation, cell-cultured food products, trade, rural broadband access and rural mental health programs.

“As our organization has done for the last 100 years, grassroots delegates from across the nation came together to express a unified voice on issues vital to the success of our farms, ranches and rural communities,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president . “It was fitting to have President Trump and numerous members of Congress among our attendees as we kicked off our centennial celebration. We continue to face a challenging farm economy and we stand ready to work with Congress and the Trump administration to address the issues important to our farm and ranch families.”

Government shutdown
Delegates urged the administration and Congress to work together to end the government shutdown as soon as possible.

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More from the OCA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet

Ohio beef producers and industry leaders met to develop policy, learn about consumer preferences and beef demand and to celebrate the many achievements of cattlemen at the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet, Jan. 12, 2019, at the Nationwide Hotel and Conference Center in Lewis Center.

More than 250 people attended the event. In addition to the annual meeting and evening banquet, there were educational breakout sessions and several youth opportunities throughout the day. Sponsors who contributed to the event’s success include Ag Credit, Alltech, COBA/Select Sires, Columbiana/Mahoning/Trumbull Cattlemen’s Association, Farm Credit Mid-America, Murphy Tractor & Equipment Company, Ohio Association of Meat Processors and the Stark County Cattlemen’s Association.

The day featured youth opportunities sponsored by Farm Credit Mid-America, including the Youth Beef Quiz Bowl and a beef quality assurance session. Nearly 30 youth participated in this two-part contest, consisting of written and verbal rounds. The winners were as follows: Junior Division: Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County, first place individual; Emma Yochum, Highland County, second place individual; and Tatumn Poff, Geauga County, third place individual.

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Be informed about 2019 dicamba requirements

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is reminding farmers of revised labels and new training requirements for applicators who intend to use dicamba herbicide products this year. In October 2018, U.S. EPA approved revised labels for the three dicamba products that are labeled for use on soybeans: Engenia (BASF), XtendiMax (Monsanto) and FeXapan (DuPont).

“Like any other product, we want to ensure licensed applicators are properly following label directions as they get ready for this growing season,” said Matt Beal, chief of the ODA Division of Plant Health. “This not only helps ensure the safe use of pesticides, it also helps prevent misuse and mishandling.”

The manufacturers of these dicamba products also agreed to additional requirements for their products. Some of the requirements include:

  • 2019 labels supersede all prior labels for these products. Applicators must obtain a copy of the new label and must have that label in their possession at the time of use
  • Only certified applicators may purchase and apply the products.
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Beef Quality Assurance Program’s online certification hits a milestone

More than 50,000 cattle producers have been certified through the Beef Quality Assurance program’s new online learning system since it was first offered in February 2017. Throughout the country hundreds of thousands have now become BQA-certified through in-person and online training, with an estimated 80% of the U.S. fed beef supply now touched by BQA-certified operations.

The beef checkoff-funded BQA program is a nationally coordinated, state implemented program that provides systematic information to U.S. beef producers and beef consumers of how commonsense husbandry techniques can be coupled with accepted scientific knowledge to raise cattle under optimum management and environmental conditions. BQA guidelines are designed to make certain all beef consumers can take pride in what they purchase — and can trust and have confidence in the entire beef industry.

Online BQA training provides 24/7 access to the program through a series of videos and animation. While in-person training is still available through numerous sessions conducted by in-state BQA coordinators throughout the country, online certification provides a chance for certification at any time.

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Growing debate on alternative protein sources

Whether it is called fake meat or clean meat, products containing alternative sources of protein have been appearing in supermarkets and restaurants around the country, and are competing with traditionally raised animal agriculture products. Attendees at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 100th Annual Convention engaged with experts on what alternative sources of protein are, who backs them and how to get the message out about the products they produce.

Plant-based “meats” (Impossible Foods, Inc. and Beyond Meat) and cell-based meats (Memphis Meats and Mosa Meat) are two types of products that have been receiving national attention over the past few years according to Eric Mittenthal, vice president of public affairs for the North American Meat Institute. Though very different in how they are produced, both groups are targeting the marketing demographic dominated by animal agriculture.

“Their audience is not the traditional vegan or vegetarian looking for new products,” Mittenthal said. “They want to compete in the meat case for meat eaters.”

Plant-based “meats” use a recipe of plant ingredients to imitate the properties of animal meat, while cell-based meats use cells taken from animals that are then grown in a lab.

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Farmers under fire from legal action

Agriculture is in the crosshairs as class-action lawsuits seek huge monetary awards against agricultural producers, said a panel of experts at a workshop at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 100th Annual Convention.

Panelists Andy Curliss, CEO of the North Carolina Pork Council; Harrison Pittman, director of the National Agriculture Law Center and Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau Federation, discussed the recent lawsuits targeting production agriculture and suggested actions that state Farm Bureaus can take to fight these targeted attacks.

AFB Women’s Leadership Committee member Lorenda Overman, moderator of the panel, summarized the law firms’ strategy in North Carolina and the effect of the verdicts on farmers.

“On paper it looks like they’re suing Smithfield Foods, but the farmer is the one on trial,” Overman said. “Once the trial is over and the verdict is read, the farms are depopulated, leaving the farmer with no income. The juries have awarded huge damages, even though all of these farms were in compliance with the law.”

Curliss said that four recent trials in North Carolina have resulted in more than $550 million in damages for 26 plaintiffs, with hundreds of other plaintiffs currently awaiting trials.

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Madison County Grain Outlook Breakfast

The 2019 Grain Outlook Breakfast is Thursday, Jan. 17 at the Der Dutchman in Plain City from 8 a.m. to noon. The meeting is $15 including hot breakfast. Pre-registration is required. Contact the Union County Extension Office at (937)644-8117.
Topics include:

· Commodity Prices – Today’s YoYo (Ben Brown)
· Examining the 2019 Ohio Farm Economy (Barry Ward)
· U.S. Trade Policy: Where is it Headed? (Ian Sheldon)
· Weather Outlook (Aaron Wilson)

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Audio: President Trump’s American Farm Bureau address and reaction after

President Donald Trump addressed the American Farm Bureau Federation on Monday, making it the second year in a row he has done so.

The President’s speech comes at a politically tumultuous time with the ongoing border wall dispute, which he was sure to touch on, carries on, leaving the government shut down. Included in the shutdown is the closure of Farm Service Agency county offices, causing a disruption to farmers hoping to sign up for programs made available in the recently signed 2018 Farm Bill.

Listen to the full speech from President Donald Trump below. Audio courtesy of the National Association of Farm Broadcasting and the American Farm Bureau.

Ohio Farm Bureau President Frank Burkett III was in attendance and spoke with Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood immediately afterward about what the President had to say and reaction from the audience.

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Semi carrying feeder pigs overturns near Dayton

By Joel Penhorwood

The busy interchange at I-70 West and I-75 North near Dayton was put on hold Monday afternoon shortly after 4 o’clock when a semi hauling feeder pigs overturned.

As originally reported by WHIO in this article, troopers said about 2,000 animals were involved in the incident. Several perished as the result of the crash. The many surviving pigs were transported to another trailer.

WHIO also reported the semi driver was not injured in the accident.

The Dayton Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol told Ohio Ag Net that troopers continued to be on scene just before 9 o’clock Monday evening.

A similar accident on the same interchange happened in October, also involving thousands of pigs.

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Sheridan receives Hall of Fame recognition

The Ohio Auctioneers Association recognized Bart K. Sheridan of Cedarville, Ohio, as one of its 2019 inductees into the Ohio Auctioneers Association Hall of Fame at its annual Conference and Show on January 5. Sheridan’s longtime auctioneer friends and competitors John Muncy of New Lebanon and Kevin Wendt of Plain City shared the microphone as they shared Sheridan’s biography and the accomplishments that paved the way for the recognition.

His father, longtime auctioneer and the 1996 OAA Hall of Fame inductee Keith Sheridan, was in attendance and provided the final introduction comments by video. Muncy and Wendt chronicled Sheridan’s twenty-four years as a professional auctioneer, preceded by growing up an auctioneer’s family. Sheridan received his Bachelor of Accountancy degree in 1989 from Miami University before practicing as a CPA in New Jersey and Ohio. He began his career as an auctioneer and real estate broker in 1995 shortly after returning to Ohio from New Jersey with his wife, Sandy, and his children.

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New research reveals how Americans are eating

The National Pork Board recently released the first report from its Insight to Action research program. The report, Dinner at Home in America, examines the contextual occasions in which Americans are eating dinner in the home. The research identifies areas of growth opportunity for pork, serving up a bold new challenge to the pork industry: innovate or risk losing relevance with today’s — and more importantly tomorrow’s — consumer.

“People live, shop and eat differently today. The pork industry has tremendous momentum with consumers, and that can be leveraged further through innovation in product development, bringing contemporary eating solutions to consumers,” said Jarrod Sutton, vice president of Domestic Marketing for the National Pork Board. “This research helps us intimately understand the needs and constraints that influence consumer dining choices, and provides a clear path for industry innovation that is rooted in data.”

Dinner at Home in America is the first of several reports the National Pork Board will publish in 2019 as part of the Insight to Action research program.

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2018 eFields Research Report available

By Elizabeth Hawkins, John Fulton, Jenna Lee

High quality, relevant information is key to making the right management decisions for your farm. The eFields program at The Ohio State University was created to provide local information about critical issues for Ohio agriculture. The 2018 eFields Research Report highlighting 95 on-farm, field scale trials conducted in 25 Ohio counties was released on Jan. 9. Research topics include nutrient management, precision seeding, crop management, soil compaction management, remote sensing, and data analysis and management. To help identify trial locations that are similar to your operation, each study includes information about weather, soil types, and management practices. Additionally, economic analysis was added to select trials this year. QR codes that link to videos featuring the researchers and partner farmers are available in the report.

The 2018 report is now available in both a print and e-version. To receive a printed copy, contact your local OSU Extension office or email digitalag@osu.edu.

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Winter maintenance worth the effort

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

Have you ever heard someone say, “What do farmers do in the winter?” As you are aware, there are many answers to this question.

Winter is a great time to get ready for spring planting, which will be here before we know it. One of the most important parts of the growing season is planting. It’s crucial that your crops get off to a good start and it’s important to make sure that your planter is field-ready when the time comes. Planting seed into the best possible growing conditions is a one of the most important tasks of spring field work. A planter in need of some adjustment can result in varied seed placement, uneven emergence, and ultimately a reduction in yield potential.

Check for and replace any parts of your planter that are excessively worn. No-till coulters or disk openers that are worn out will not create the proper seed furrow and may cause poor seed placement.

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Trump returns to AFBF Annual Convention

Donald J. Trump, the 45th president of the United States, will address farm and ranch families from across the nation at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 100th Annual Convention. This address will mark the second time in as many years that the president has appeared at Farm Bureau’s Annual Convention. This year’s gathering takes place Jan. 11-16 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

“The American Farm Bureau Federation is honored once again to host our nation’s president,” said AFBF President Zippy Duvall, a beef and poultry farmer from Georgia. “President Trump has made agriculture a clear priority, giving farmers and ranchers a seat at the table on the top issues affecting our farms, ranches and rural communities. What better way to celebrate 100 years of Farm Bureau than to welcome the president of the United States to our centennial celebration?”

Other national officials attending the AFBF Annual Convention include Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, USDA Under Secretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs Ted McKinney and several members of Congress: Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), Sen.

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Hunters harvest more than 14,000 deer during Ohio’s muzzleloader season

Hunters checked 14,182 white-tailed deer during Ohio’s muzzleloader season, Jan. 5-8, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR). During last year’s muzzleloader season, 13,268 white-tailed deer were checked.

Hunters still have opportunities to pursue deer this winter, as archery season remains open through Sunday, Feb. 3.

The ODNR Division of Wildlife remains committed to properly managing Ohio’s deer populations. The goal of Ohio’s Deer Management Program is to provide a deer population that maximizes recreational opportunities, while minimizing conflicts with landowners and motorists.

Hunting Popularity

Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Hunting has a more than $853 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more, according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation publication.

Find more information about deer hunting in the Ohio 2018-2019 Hunting and Trapping Regulations or at wildohio.gov.

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Local residents honored for support of fairs

Forty-four individuals and one group were recently recognized at the 94th Ohio Fair Managers Association annual convention at the Greater Columbus Convention Center for outstanding service to their local fairs. Of this group, eight received the Director’s Award for Innovation and Excellence for their progressive ideas and actions to improve and strengthen their fairs. Ohio Department of Agriculture Interim Director Tim Derickson presented each winner with a certificate. Those chosen for the special honor (denoted by an asterisk below) received plaques.

The award recipients were:

Adams County: Mark Wickerham

Allen County: Max McCluer

Ashland County: Susan VanBuskirk Denbow*

Attica Independent: Bill Ruffing

Belmont County: Roger Perkins

Clark County: Dr. John Agle

Clermont County: Janice Schoellman

Columbiana County: Michael A. Conny

Coshocton County: Joe Wells

Crawford County: Travis Koschnick

Delaware County: Andrew Brenner

Fayette County: Dr. Robert Schwartz

Franklin County: Cornell Robertson

Franklin County: Ken Jewell*

Franklin County: Neil Distelhorst

Gallia County: Mike McCalla*

Geauga County: Artie Pritt

Greene County: Gary Zehring*

Hamilton County: Kristy Cook

Hardin County: Jim Bidwell

Harrison County: Nelson Birney

Henry County: Phil Parsons

Henry County: Marian Parsons

Huron County: Community Minded Fair Supporters Committee*

Lake County: Joe Slansky*

Marion County: Pat Baldinger

Medina County: Jeff Otterbacher

Miami County: John F.

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Ohio township bill could impact ag zoning

By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Agricultural and Resource Law Program, Ohio State University

In December, the Ohio House of Representatives and Senate agreed to modifications to House Bill 500, which would make a number of changes to Ohio’s township laws. Some of the highlights of the most recent version include:

  • A board of township trustees must select a chairperson annually.
  • Petitions to change the name of township roads will result in an automatic name change if the county commissioners do not adopt a resolution regarding the petition within 60 days.
  • County commissioners will not be able to vacate township roads unless the applicable board of township trustees have adopted a resolution approving the vacation.
  • A board of township trustees will have the authority to charge a fee against a person who appeals a zoning decision to the board of zoning appeals in order to defray costs associated with advertising, mailing, and the like.
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