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Memories left hanging

By Kolt Buchenroth, Ohio Ag Net

It can be argued that the world is in a state of unrest. Social Media is very rapidly becoming “here’s where you can find toilet paper.” The authorities are being called over a jar of peanut butter in the grocery store. Our county’s Emergency Operations Center is open and activated for the first time since I learned of its existence. After 35 consecutive runs (one of which during a Level 3 snow emergency), the Hardin County Fair cancelled the annual consignment farm machinery sale — a true sign of the times.

Perhaps the most gut wrenching outcome of all of this is the time the students aren’t spending together. I write this blog post on the way back from a spring break spent in North Carolina with family. My cousin is a senior in high school. I watched a look of sadness and disappointment as their principal announced her soccer season was suspended until the beginning of April.… Continue reading

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Soybean research recap

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader: a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff

Soybean fertility studies, relative maturity, row width, seeding rates, and the benefits of adding wheat to the rotation were just a few of the topics covered by Laura Lindsey in a presentation given at the Conservation Tillage Conference in Ada last week.

“A study conducted from 2013-2015 with 199 farmers in Ohio looked at cultural practices, and measured soil fertility and

Laura Lindsey, OSU Extension Soybean and Small Grains specialist

soil cyst nematode levels in 600 fields,” said Laura Lindsey, Ohio State University Extension soybean and small grains specialist. “The study investigated both the highest yielding areas of the field and lowest yielding areas of each field and compared them. Soil fertility was a primary factor that accounted for yield differences.”

When evaluating soil test phosphorus (P), 65% of the fields had at least a portion of the field that needed P fertilizer.

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COVID-19 makes for a different trip to D.C.

By Dave Russell, Ohio Ag Net

So, I’ve been coming on the Ohio Farm Bureau’s County Presidents’ trip to Washington, D.C. since, gosh I don’t remember the exact year, but it was the late ‘70s or early ‘80s. What I do know is that I’ve been coming on this trip longer than some of this year’s participants have been alive.

This year’s trip, though, was a little different. Well, I mean other than all of the talk about coronavirus it seemed to me that it was pretty much business as usual in our nation’s capital. There were still plenty of people walking the halls of Congress, cab drivers waiting for their next fare, Uber drivers pulling up and taking said fare.

But then, of course you should probably consider the numerous conversations about running out of toilet paper and hand sanitizer. That’s definitely different from previous trips. Evidently this is a big deal when you go to the store and the shelves are bare and Johnny just used the last roll.… Continue reading

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Last chance for farm bill program sign-up March 16

Agricultural producers who have not yet completed their 2019 crop year elections for and enrollment in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs must schedule an appointment to do so with their local USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) by Monday, March 16.

“To date, more than 1.4 million contracts have been signed for the 2019 crop year. This represents 89 percent of expected enrollment with less than a week left for producers to get on FSA’s appointment books,” said FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce. “If you’ve not completed your elections or enrollment, the clock is ticking, and your program eligibility is at stake; so please call FSA today and request an appointment.”

Producers who do not contact FSA for an appointment by close of business local time on Monday, March 16 will not be enrolled in ARC or PLC for the 2019 crop year and will be ineligible to receive a payment should one trigger for an eligible crop.… Continue reading

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Ohio agricultural events postponed and cancelled amid COVID-19 concerns

On March 12, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton, M.D., MPH gave an update on the impact of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Ohio when there were five confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state (as of around 2:00 p.m. EST). The fourth case involved a hospitalized man, age 53, in Stark County who has no travel history outside of the United States. Because this individual has had no known contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient, this is the first instance of “community spread” in Ohio —meaning there is no known source of infection. The local health department is investigating the individual’s contacts.

During his news conference on March 12, DeWine said the state will be ordering that no mass gatherings of more than 100 people will be allowed in the state. The order will include auditoriums, stadiums, arenas, large conference rooms, meeting halls, cafeterias, or any other confined indoor or outdoor space.… Continue reading

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2020 Ohio Beef Expo cancelled

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association announced that the 2020 Ohio Beef Expo will be cancelled.

“We understand the significance of this decision that impacts so many involved with the event,” OCA said in a Facebook post.

OCA also issued the following statement:

The safety and health of our producers, families, youth, and allied industry supporters is of great importance to our organization. Consistent with that commitment and in accordance with orders from Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, the Ohio Beef Expo, which was scheduled for March 19-22, will be cancelled.

Governor DeWine and the Ohio Department of Health have issued an order prohibiting any mass gatherings in the state as a preventative measure to address the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) In addition, as you know, our event is held at the Ohio Expo Center, which is a State Government location, so it is directly impacted by the order.

OCA will be convening calls with Ohio Beef Expo sale managers to determine how to best assist them in marketing the cattle consigned to the seven Expo sales.Continue reading

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Uncertainty impacting grain markets

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

Fear of the coronavirus seems to be spreading faster than the actual disease and this is impacting the grain markets.

 

Meat consumption uncertainty

Some are fearing people won’t want to leave home and will dine out less, resulting in less overall meat consumption. However, there are also stories of supermarkets running low on meat, as people prepare for possible extended home stays. So, the market may be overreacting to the fear of the unknown. Until more is understood about how the virus spreads, the recovery time, and the mortality rate, the market will likely select the direction that seems less risky.

 

Tight corn spreads

Because the markets have dropped so much and so quickly many farmers are simply not selling their grain. This has contributed to the narrowest May/July corn spread since the spring of 2013. Typically, a tight spread indicates a supply shortage where the market wants grain now instead of waiting.… Continue reading

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Labor concerns with COVID-19 could impact pork supply chain

The fallout from an ongoing labor shortage facing the U.S. pork industry and other agriculture sectors could significantly worsen due to the impact of COVID-19, the National Pork Producers Council said in a letter to U.S. government officials. NPPC’s concerns regarding COVID-19 are labor specific. There is no evidence that pigs can contract the virus.

In a letter to the president and other administration officials, members of Congress, and state governors, NPPC called for expedited solutions addressing the need for more workers on hog farms and in pork plants. It also called on federal, state and local governments to work together to develop a response to COVID-19 that protects public health and, whenever possible, supports animal care and minimizes disruptions to the U.S. pork production supply chain and consumers. NPPC also called on the administration to develop support plans for hog farmers if labor-related bottlenecks in the supply chain prevent hogs from being marketed.… Continue reading

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The role of soil microbes

By James J. Hoorman, Hoorman Soil Health Services

Soil microbes are abundant, making nutrients available to plants. There are more soil microbes in a teaspoon of soil than there are people on earth. Most soil microbes exist under starvation conditions and are dormant, especially in tilled soils. There are 1,000-2,000 times more microbes near active live roots than tilled soil, and each microbe is a soluble bag of plant available fertilizer. Active roots supply 25-45% of their total root carbohydrates to feed the microbes. The plants feed the soil microbes sugars and the microbes supply the plant with amino acids, soil nutrients, and water.

Bacteria, actinomycetes, and protozoa tolerate soil disturbance and dominate in tilled soils. Fungi and nematode populations tend to dominate no-till soils with live plants. Recent research shows that humus originates mainly from the dead bodies of microbes stacked up in the soil. Good soil is just a graveyard for dead microbes!

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Changing climate a hot topic on 74th Ohio Farm Bureau County Presidents’ Trip to Washington, D.C.

By Dave Russell and Matt Reese

The climate is changing and it is evident on farms in Ohio and the streets of Washington, D.C. The political discussions on this hot topic continue in the halls of Congress and on this year’s 74th Ohio Farm Bureau County Presidents’ Trip to Washington, D.C.

“There is renewed focus in Congress on the issue of climate,” said Andrew Walmsley, director of congressional relations for American Farm Bureau. “There is a recognition that at some point, either this Congress, next Congress or three congresses down the road, something is going to happen with climate change in Congress and we need to be involved.”

With that in mind, American Farm Bureau teamed up with a broad collation of agricultural organizations to tell the story of food production and climate.

Farmers for a Sustainable Future is a fairly new group here in Washington, D.C. to come around the table and discuss the issues of sustainability and climate and really try to stake out a place in these discussions for agriculture to play a role,” Walmsley said.… Continue reading

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Pivot Bio with Randy Minton

Dusty Sonnenberg talks with Randy Minton from Pivot Bio about their ProveN which is a technology that helps the corn plant capture Nitrogen from the atmosphere and utilize it in grain production. Research shows increased yield and better nitrogen utilization with this innovative product.… Continue reading

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Update from NRCS

A conversation with…

Matt Lohr, Chief of USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service who recently spoke at the Ohio Federation of Soil and Water Conservation Districts 2020 Annual Partnership Meeting

 

OCJ: You have a farm and agricultural background right?

Matt: I do. I’m a fifth generation farmer from Virginia. We raise about three quarters of a million broiler chickens a year, feeder cattle, corn and bean rotation, and 20 acres of sweet corn. My wife, Beth, and I have six children who are all very involved in our farm. So it’s been very exciting for me to continue that tradition of farming with this next generation. And we’ll see — they’re still young so I’m not sure if I’ve got a full time farmer in the family or not. But we’ve done a good job of trying to instill a love of conservation in each of them.

 

OCJ: Now what are some of the key comments and topics you are talking about with some of the folks from Ohio?… Continue reading

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Gov. DeWine creates BroadbandOhio to support expansion of high-speed Internet

Governor Mike DeWine recently announced the creation of BroadbandOhio, an office dedicated to improving access to high-speed internet across Ohio. Establishing an office committed to increasing high-speed internet access across the state was a pillar of the Ohio Broadband Strategy that was released in December 2019.

“BroadbandOhio will implement our strategy for increasing high-speed internet access to underserved and unserved Ohioans across the state,” said Governor Mike DeWine. “We know there are more than 300,000 households in Ohio without broadband access. We need to increase access and establishing the office is a first step.”

BroadbandOhio will implement the Ohio Broadband Strategy and be the point of contact for all broadband projects in Ohio. The office will be charged with identifying high-priority initiatives and ensure their completion, as well as serve as a liaison among state agencies in order to implement the goals of the state in expanding access and supporting Ohioans who have been left without access to the modern economy, education system, and healthcare system due to their lack of high-speed connectivity.… Continue reading

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March 10 WASDE offers neutral numbers

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Ahead of the report, many had expected it to be a non-bullish report for grains.

Shortly after the USDA report was released, corn was up 4 cents, soybeans up 8 cents, and wheat up 2 cents. Just before the noon report, grains were all higher with corn up 3 cents, soybeans up 9 cents, and wheat up 3 cents.

Soybean exports and crush were unchanged. Ending stocks at 425 million bushels were unchanged. Corn exports and corn for ethanol were unchanged. Ending stocks were unchanged at 1.892 billion bushels. Brazil soybean production was increased one million tons to 126 million tons. Argentina soybean production was up one million tons to 54 million tons. Wheat exports were unchanged with ending stocks unchanged at 940 million bushels. Trader estimates for ending stocks were little changed from last month for corn, soybeans, and wheat.

The media hysteria with the Coronavirus is ongoing.… Continue reading

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In Brazil, it’s time to pay attention to “safrinha” corn

With half of the soybean harvest complete in Brazil by Mar 5, it is time, again, to take a look at the second corn crop, also known as “safrinha”, which is being planted later than normal due to a delay in the soybean crop, caused by irregular rains in the last quarter of 2019.

Until last week, 80% of the projected area had been planted in south-central Brazil, in line with the five-year average, but only because top producer Mato Grosso has nearly finished sowing, according to AgRural data. In other states, the ideal window is already closed or about to end and farmers are working at full steam to avoid planting a large area during the second half of March.

Riskier crop
The late planting makes the second corn crop more susceptible to yield losses caused by dryness and/or freezing temperatures during pollination and grain filling. Despite the delay, Brazil is likely to increase its area by around 3%, thanks to very attractive prices – a result of strong demand and a weakening Brazilian real against the dollar.Continue reading

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Corn planting date considerations

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

For much of the Eastern Corn Belt it is widely understood that the optimal planting period is between April 20th and May 10th. Research has proven that corn loses yield potential daily when planted after the beginning of May. For the Central Corn Belt, the declines in yield potential due to planting delays vary from about 0.3% per day early in May to about 1% per day by the end of May. Knowing that this is true, it can be frustrating during a wet spring or when field work is delayed for one reason or another. Planting is a critical component of a successful crop as it sets the stage for the entire growing season. However, it is important to keep in mind that early planting is just one of many factors that contribute to high yield potential. Planting early favors high yields, but it does not guarantee them and growers should not focus entirely on the calendar.… Continue reading

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Transition to organic grains workshop

By Eric Richer, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

Is your farming operation looking for alternatives to commodity corn and soybeans? Have you been wondering how to add value to your operation? On Tuesday, April 7th from 9 am to 2 pm at the Robert Fulton Agriculture Center, 8770 State Route 108, Wauseon, OH, OSU Extension will be hosting a discussion of the opportunities and challenges associated with growing a value-added, organic grain crop. This discussion will be open to current, transitioning, or interested organic farmers, farmland owners, venders and grain buyers. The workshop will address three primary hurdles for transitioning to organic grains: market options, weed control and organic documentation.

Speakers include Julia Barton, Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, discussing the organic transition process including the required documentation and approved products for use. Then Dani Kusner, The Andersons-Organic Division, will walk through key organic agronomy principles that could possibly require a mindset change on your farm.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net| Ep. 144| The Great Black Swamp

What was the Great Black Swamp is today’s hub for the H2Ohio discussion. Matt and Dusty host this week’s podcast with Jordan Hoewischer from the Ohio Farm Bureau. Matt sat down with Jeff Duling from the Federation of Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Districts, Kris Swartz from Wood County, and Mark Wilson and talked about water quality. Dusty had a round table discussion down at the Commodity Classic in San Antonio with three farmers from Northwest Ohio about H2Ohio. And Matt and Dusty sat down with Matt Liskai from Greenfield Ag.… Continue reading

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