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2019 I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour summary

Since last fall, incessant wet weather plagued every sector of Ohio agriculture and made the planting season among the most difficult ever. Ohio’s staggering 1,485,919 acres of prevented planting ground sounds bad, but looked even worse when passing by on the 2019 I-75/I-71 Crop Tour sponsored by AgroLiquid. The many empty fields in the state served as a stark and sobering reminder of the challenging spring throughout Ohio, and especially in the northwest where no farm on the tour planted all of their intended corn acres. Sadly, in many cases, the fields that were planted were not much better off. Much of the corn in northern Ohio was a solid month behind developmentally, making yield estimates very difficult and not much more than educated guesses. Many planting dates north of I-70 were in June, which leaves a long road ahead for the corn crop that had not even finished pollinating.… Continue reading

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Germinate Film Fest offers unique way to share and learn about agriculture

By Matt Reese

Some may be curious why Ohio, or anywhere for that matter, would host a film festival around the topic of agriculture. Yet, it is not difficult to see how influential video and other media can be in today’s society and there is no question agriculture needs to find new ways to reach out in informative and entertaining ways. With this in mind, Ohio State University Extension is hosting a truly unique event this month with the Germinate International Film Fest in Hillsboro, Aug. 16 and 17.

“The Germinate International Film Fest is entirely focused on agriculture, rural communities and our natural resources. This is really the first film festival of its kind anywhere that is truly focused on this type of content,” said Brooke Beam, with Ohio State University Extension in Highland County. “We’ve had a great turnout of individuals who wanted to apply and submit to the film festival.… Continue reading

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OCF Young Cattlemen’s Conference provides industry learning experience

The 2019 Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation Young Cattlemen’s Conference (YCC) hosted 19 cattlemen and women for a three-day leadership development program in central Ohio, Aug. 8-10. The conference was made possible through the support of program sponsors, Farm Credit Mid-America, Ohio Beef Council, Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association, Ohio Soybean Council and the Rick Malir & Bonnie Coley-Malir Beef Leadership Fund.

YCC kicked off Thursday evening at the Ronald McDonald House of Columbus where participants were able to tour the house and learn about its mission. Attendees also had the opportunity to network over a beef dinner with members of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s Board of Directors, program sponsor representatives and other industry professionals. Vice President of Wendy’s Protein Procurement and Innovation, Quality Supply Chain Co-op, Inc. (QSSC), Dr. Henry Zerby, served as the guest speaker for the evening and shared his thoughts on the future of the beef industry and some of the challenges it faces moving forward.… Continue reading

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A legal look at wind farm setbacks

By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural and Resource Law Program

The Ohio Power Siting Board’s approval of new wind-turbine models in facility’s certificate does not constitute an amendment to the certificate for the purposes of triggering current turbine-setback requirements. In 2014, the Ohio Power Siting Board approved an application by Greenwich Windpark to construct a wind farm in Huron County with up to 25 wind turbines. In the initial application, all of the wind turbines would have used the same model of turbine. Just over a year after the application was approved, the wind farm developer applied for an amendment to add three additional models to the approved wind turbine model list, noting that the technology had advanced since its initial application. Two of the three newer models would be larger than the originally planned model, but would occupy the same locations and would comply with the minimum setback requirements at the time the application was approved.… Continue reading

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USDA designates 16 Ohio counties as primary natural disaster areas

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue designated 16 Ohio counties as primary natural disaster areas. Producers who suffered losses due to five separate disaster events may be eligible for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) emergency loans.

This natural disaster designation allows FSA to extend much-needed emergency credit to producers recovering from natural disasters. Emergency loans can be used to meet various recovery needs including the replacement of essential items such as equipment or livestock, reorganization of a farming operation or the refinance of certain debts.

 

Excessive Precipitation, Flooding and Ponding – March 1 – June 6, 2019

Producers in Fulton, Henry and Lucas counties who suffered losses caused by excessive precipitation, flooding and ponding that occurred between March 1 and June 6, 2019, are eligible to apply for emergency loans.

Producers in the contiguous Ohio counties of Defiance, Hancock, Ottawa, Putnam, Williams and Wood, along with Hillsdale, Lenawee and Monroe counties in Michigan, are also eligible to apply for emergency loans.… Continue reading

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Top Ohio counties for prevented planting in 2019

In Ohio, there were 1,485,919 prevented planting acres in 2019. Of that more than 880,992 prevented planting acres were corn and over 598,981 acres were soybeans. More than 5,883 Ohio wheat acres were included on the list as well with the balance being made up of oats and sorghum, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency.

The top Ohio counties in prevented planting acres for 2019 were: Wood (120,480), Hardin (91,389), Defiance (84,198), Seneca (74,635), Hancock (74,169), Henry (71,083), Fulton (70,514), Paulding (62,567), Williams (60,373), and Wyandot (53,860).

Nationally agricultural producers reported they were not able to plant crops on more than 19.4 million acres in 2019, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This marks the most prevented plant acres reported since USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) began releasing the report in 2007 and 17.49 million acres more than reported at this time last year.… Continue reading

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Taking property without just compensation

By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural and Resource Law Program

A property owner may bring a claim in federal court under the Fifth Amendment when the government has violated the Takings Clause by taking property without just compensation. This case involved a township ordinance requiring all cemeteries to be held open and accessible to the general public during daylight hours. A property owner with a small family graveyard was notified that she was violating the ordinance. The property owner filed suit in state court arguing that the ordinance constituted a taking of her property, but did not seek compensation. The township responded by saying it would withdraw the notice of violation and not enforce the ordinance against her. The state court said that the matter was therefore resolved, but the property owner was not satisfied with that decision. She decided to bring a takings claim in federal court.… Continue reading

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Are crops catching up?

By Laura Lindsey and Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension

 

Corn

Crop development varies tremendously across Ohio because of planting dates that range from late April to early July. According to field agronomists in some areas of the state, it looks like late-planted crops are “ rushing through development” …Unlike soybean, corn development is directly related to temperature, i.e. heat unit accumulation. Above average July temperatures (especially nighttime temperatures) have promoted rapid corn growth and development. After corn reaches the V10 stage (and most of our June plantings are near or beyond this stage), leaf collar emergence occurs at approximately one leaf every 50 GDDs.

Late planted corn fields (especially those that have adequate soil moisture and good soil fertility and weed control) may appear to be “catching up” with neighboring fields planted earlier. The rapid growth of late planted corn is associated with greater vegetative growth and faster canopy closure, which will help optimize yields.… Continue reading

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Ohio Crop Progress: Soil moisture levels down

Warm and dry conditions continued last week as operators were busy in the fields, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 11. Topsoil moisture moved from 38 percent short and very short to 46 percent short and very short last week while subsoil moisture moved from 25 percent short and very short to 33 percent short and very short. Corn and soybean progress continued to lag behind in all categories and could use timely rains for grain fill. Winter wheat harvest wrapped up last week. Oats were also harvested during ideal harvest conditions and surpassed the five-year average. Hay making showed steady progress, but overall progress lagged slightly behind the five-year averages. Conditions were ideal last week across much of the State for spraying weeds, applying fungicides, installing drain tile, mowing, and many other field activities.… Continue reading

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Prevented planting acres announced for 2019

Agricultural producers reported they were not able to plant crops on more than 19.4 million acres in 2019, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This marks the most prevented plant acres reported since USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) began releasing the report in 2007 and 17.49 million acres more than reported at this time last year.

Of those prevented plant acres, more than 73% were in 12 Midwestern states, where heavy rainfall and flooding this year has prevented many producers from planting mostly corn, soybeans and wheat.

“Agricultural producers across the country are facing significant challenges and tough decisions on their farms and ranches,” said Bill Northey, USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation. “We know these are challenging times for farmers, and we have worked to improve flexibility of our programs to assist producers prevented from planting.”

In Ohio, there were 1,485,919 prevented planting acres in 2019.… Continue reading

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RFS waivers drawing ire of ag

According to a recent Reuters report, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved 31 of its 38 pending small refinery exemptions (SREs) for 2018. Recipients of the exemptions are not required to comply with renewable volume obligations under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

The RFS exists to drive investment in American-grown biofuels. EPA, though, allows waivers exempting small refineries from the RFS and cuts demand for biofuels.

“After more than a year of constant trade escalation, President Trump seems determined to destroy the United States’ reputation as a reliable supplier of quality agricultural products. At the same time, his EPA seems bent on destroying our domestic market for renewable fuels. Together, these actions are crippling our markets, creating enormous stress in the countryside, and forcing more and more farmers into bankruptcy,” said Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union. “Our farmers are growing weary of the news from this White House.… Continue reading

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2019 Ohio Youth Capital Challenge winners announced

A team of three Ohio high school students took first place in the 2019 Ohio Youth Capital Challenge finals for their policy proposal about biosecurity at Ohio fairs.

Sponsored by Ohio Farm Bureau, Ohio 4-H and Ohio FFA, the challenge brings together youths ages 14 to 18 from around the state to discuss community concerns and then work together to propose policies and programs to solve the issues.

The 2019 winning team members are Caleb Durheim and Dustin Hill of Delaware County and Samantha Hinton of Seneca County. The team members share a $1500 prize for finishing first in the competition.

The challenge started in the spring when groups met to learn about public policy issues and began planning their proposals. A preliminary contest narrowed the field down to four teams, which competed in the finals during the Ohio State Fair.

The teams were judged on their public policy proposals dealing with a specific issue or problem.… Continue reading

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Keep an eye on crop diseases

Late-planted corn and soybeans could be vulnerable to higher-than-normal levels of crop diseases this year. When sown one to two months later than usual, corn and soybeans stand a greater chance of succumbing, especially, to fungal diseases.

Dry weather across much of Ohio since July has helped stave off some disease spread because fungal diseases need moisture to thrive. Still, during a year when late planting has already limited the yield potential on crops, it’s critical to be watchful for other threats too, including all types of diseases, molds, and insects, advise experts with Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

Fungal diseases that can infect either soybeans or corn can survive through the winter on the crop residue left in a field after harvest, said Pierce Paul, a specialist in corn and small grain diseases with CFAES. Spores of the pathogens that cause the diseases form in the spring and spread.… Continue reading

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Qualified business income deduction for sales to cooperatives: Proposed regulations

By Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, Director, Ohio State University Income Tax Schools

Soon after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act became law in December of 2017 it became evident that cooperatives had been granted a significant advantage under the new tax law. Sales to cooperatives would be allowed a Qualified Business Income Deduction (QBID) of 20% of gross income and not of net income. Sales to businesses other than cooperatives would be eligible only for the QBID of net income, which was a significant disadvantage. Suddenly cooperatives had an advantage that non-cooperative businesses couldn’t match and most of the farm sector scrambled to position themselves to take advantage of this tax advantage. Some farmers directed larger portions of their sales or prospective sales toward cooperatives. Non-cooperative businesses lobbied for a change to this piece of the new tax law while looking for ways to add a cooperative model to their own businesses to stay competitive.… Continue reading

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New AgriPOWER Institute class announced

Seventeen farmers and agribusiness professionals have been selected to participate in Ohio Farm Bureau’s 2019-2020 AgriPOWER Institute. The goal of the elite, yearlong training program is to help participants become community leaders and advocates for agriculture. During the program, participants will attend multiple sessions to learn about public policy matters important to their communities as well as the state of Ohio, nation and world.

Class XI members are John Bolte of Tiffin, Jon Brookbank of North Ridgeville, Ashley Brucker of Columbus, Lauren Fehlan of Troy, Kelli Hartman of Wilmington, Josh Ison of Moscow, Kenzie Johnston of Richwood, Richard Maxwell of Glenford, Matt McFadden of Wilmington, Kayla Miller of Archbold, Jared Persinger of Washington Court House, Ashley Phillips of Warsaw, Devin Trout of Columbus, Vince Untied of Newark, Vicki Vance of Gambier, Kevin Ward of Upper Sandusky and Emmalee Wince of Salem.

Throughout the year, Class XI participants will develop important skills necessary to become effective leaders and advocates, including spokesperson and media training, etiquette training, social networking, communications and more.… Continue reading

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Low corn and soybean yields predicted for 2019

The latest AccuWeather 2019 crop production analysis predicts a significant decline from last year’s corn and soybean yield, as well as a noticeable variation from the July U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates.

AccuWeather analysts predict the 2019 corn yield will be 13.07 billion bushels, a decline of 9.3% from 2018 and 5.8% lower than the latest USDA figures. It would be the lowest yield since 2012, a year of a significant drought that saw final corn production numbers plummet to 10.76 billion bushels.

The difference between AccuWeather and USDA estimates centers on forecasts for projected corn acres harvested, with AccuWeather analysts concerned that late-planted corn either won’t yield well or could be affected more so this year by on-time frost.

AccuWeather’s projected soybean yield of 3.9 billion bushels reflects an even greater decline from 2018’s final soybean production numbers. It would be a 14.1% dropoff from the final figure of 4.544 billion bushels, and the lowest yield since 2013 (3.357 billion bushels).… Continue reading

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Livestock groups launch campaign highlighting the benefits of grazing

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Public Lands Council today launched a digital campaign focused on the value of grazing. The digital campaign was created to explore key elements of grazing that benefit the environment, rural communities, and local economies across the United States.

The four-week campaign launched with a video and blog post featuring Rich Atmore, a California rancher that lived through the destructive 2017 Thomas Fire. With the use of livestock grazing, Atmore mitigated the intensity and damage of wildfires around his home and surrounding urban landscapes.

“Wildfire mitigation is just one of the many benefits of livestock grazing,” said Jennifer Houston, NCBA President. “Cattle positively contribute to the environment and our food production system, and it’s a story many need to hear. We need to arm the public with facts; it’s livestock who provide natural nutrients to the soil, ensure our native grasslands remain intact, and ensure rural America remains economically supported.”

Research finds that managed livestock grazing prevents catastrophic wildfire, cycles nutrients through the soil, fosters healthy habitats for wildlife, and supports rural economic development.… Continue reading

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Trade with China still stalled

The much-hoped-for trade deal with China continues to flounder as negotiations once again came up short.

“China’s announcement that it will not buy any agricultural products from the United States is a body blow to thousands of farmers and ranchers who are already struggling to get by. In the last 18 months alone, farm and ranch families have dealt with plunging commodity prices, awful weather and tariffs higher than we have seen in decades,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president. “Farm Bureau economists tell us exports to China were down by $1.3 billion during the first half of the year. Now, we stand to lose all of what was a $9.1 billion market in 2018, which was down sharply from the $19.5 billion U.S. farmers exported to China in 2017.

“We are grateful for Market Facilitation Program payments many farmers and ranchers have received, allowing them to continue farming during this difficult time.… Continue reading

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Sonnenberg joins staff to head up Ohio Field Leader

Dusty Sonnenberg is excited to join the staff of Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net with Field Leader, an Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff program. Sonnenberg will be providing Ohio Field Leader content about soybean agronomics, production research, and nutrient management, among other topics. The goal of Ohio Field Leader is to bring the most up-to-date agronomist, research, and best management practice information to Ohio soybean farmers.

Sonnenberg will also be a regular contributor to Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net in his role. Ohio Field Leader content will be distributed to other state and national media outlets as well.

“Dusty brings tremendous on-farm, agronomic and communications experience to this position and we are excited about moving this project forward,” said Bart Johnson, owner of Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net. “Dusty will be a real asset to our team and Ohio agriculture.”

Sonnenberg is a Certified Crop Advisor and Technical Service Provider writing nutrient management plans.… Continue reading

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Ohio State Fair attendance up

The 2019 Ohio State Fair concluded its 12-day run on Sunday, Aug. 4 with an estimated 934,925 attendees entering the gates between July 24 and August 4. This marks an increase of approximately 3 percent more visitors than 2018.

“This year’s weather was absolutely beautiful, and hundreds of thousands of Ohioans turned out to celebrate our great state and experience all that the Fair has to offer. Some of the most popular aspects each year are the animals, education, food, art and rides,” said Virgil Strickler, General Manager. “We are so thankful for the many people who worked hard all year long to make this a great Fair.”

The annual Ohio State Fair, held at the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus, celebrates agriculture — the state’s largest industry — and is well-known across the country for traditions including the famed butter cow and calf, the unique eight-acre Natural Resources Park, and one of the largest youth livestock shows in the nation.… Continue reading

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