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Fertilizer recertification opportunity May 30

By Mark Badertscher, Ohio State University Extension

Do you have a fertilizer certificate that is set to expire May 31 and need a final chance to renew it before it expires? If so, there is a fertilizer recertification class scheduled in Kenton (Hardin County) for May 30 at 7:00 pm. This one-hour evening class will meet the requirements for the Ohio Department of Agriculture. The class will be held at the Hardin County OSU Extension Office, 1021 W. Lima Street, Kenton, Ohio. Please arrive early to allow time for check-in or registration and bring your Ohio ‘Fertilizer Applicator Certificate’ card.

Seating is limited, so pre-register at go.osu.edu/hardinmay30fertrecert or call 419-674-2297. There is a $10 class fee payable to OSU Extension that can be taken care of online or the evening of the class. Registration for this training does not include the applicator license renewal fee that is due to the Ohio Department of Agriculture.

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Managing head scab with fungicides: Prosaro v. Caramba v. Miravis Ace

By Pierce Paul, Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist

What should I spray for scab and vomitoxin control? With the addition of Miravis Ace (a new DMI + SDHI premix) to the list of fungicides recommended for the control of Fusarium head blight (head scab) and vomitoxin in wheat and barley, questions are being asked as to whether it is any better than Prosaro and Caramba. In 2018, we compared the three fungicides on scab susceptible varieties across 12 environments and found that in terms of efficacy against head scab and vomitoxin, Prosaro, Caramba, and Miravis Ace were very comparable. Disease severity, vomitoxin contamination, and fungicide efficacy varied among locations, but on average, all three fungicides reducing scab by about 55-60% and vomitoxin by approximately 50-55%.

When should these fungicides be sprayed for scab control? Another commonly asked question about Miravis Ace pertains to its efficacy when applied at early heading (Feekes 10.3).

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Apple Farm Service announces Local Government Appreciation Days

Do you work for the township, county, city, or state government? Apple Farm Service appreciates everything you do to keep our streets, parks, neighborhoods, and communities maintained and safe. They would like to say thank you with a special day just for you.

Apple Farm Service is excited to announce their first annual Local Government Appreciation Days. Anyone who works for any level of government (whether local, state, or federal) are invited to join them!

Mark your calendars for these dates:

• Covington Store, 10120 West Versailles Rd., Covington. Thursday, June 6, 10 a.m. untill 3 p.m.

• Mechanicsburg Store, 12446 East State Rt 29, Mechanicsburg, Thursday, June 13, 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Government employees can stop by for prize giveaways, product demonstrations, test drives, and equipment education. Apple Farm Service will also be firing up the grill for a cook-out lunch.

Product specialists will be on site to provide equipment education, lessons to find the best deals with government bidding and purchasing programs, and product demonstrations.

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Webinar looks at the changing climate and agriculture

Weather patterns are changing and presenting unique challenges to the agricultural community, both in Ohio and across the globe. An upcoming webinar will focus on the changing weather patterns, how those shifts have impacted the industry and ways the ag community can adapt.

On June 20, 2019 at 11 a.m. EST Webinar host Aaron Wilson will take an hour long look at the changing climate. Wilson is an atmospheric scientist at The Ohio State University and an expert in weather, climatology and climate change. He holds a joint appointment as a research scientist at the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, as a climate specialist with OSU Extension and is a contributing member to the State Climate Office of Ohio. His recent work focuses on the local impacts of changing weather patterns, particularly those affecting the ag sector.

The session will cover:

  • Challenges a changing climate presents to Ohio’s ag sector.
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OBIC Bioproducts Innovation Center to complete second summer of sustainability

Through the support of the Ohio Soybean Council, the OBIC Bioproducts Innovation Center at the Ohio State University will continue its education and outreach program, the Ohio Soy Sustainable Summer, throughout the summer of 2019.

This program reaches a wide audience through a mobile platform, delivering an interactive display to various STEM-based events, youth camps, and county fairs throughout the state. Participants will have the chance to interact with soy-based products while learning about the positive impact they have on sustainability and the American economy.

Program assistant, Brad Collins, and student assistant, Haley Wilson, a senior studying agriscience education, will be conducting the programs this summer. They will facilitate various activities that will inform consumers and students about how they can decrease their carbon footprint by living a biobased lifestyle.

According to the OBIC Bioproducts Innovation Center 2018 Consumer Market Survey, only 8% of Americans are very familiar with biobased products or packaging.

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Pioneer Field Report: Evaluate wheat, alfalfa stands

In this week’s Pioneer Field Report, Ohio Ag Net is joined by Pioneer Field Agronomist Brad Ott. Ott discusses the extended planting season in front of us and what that means from a consideration of crops going to the field. He’s encouraging growers to not make too many changes at this point, but be evaluating needs on a field-by-field basis. Alfalfa and wheat stand needs are also important at this time going forward across Ohio.

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Hemp bill completes third hearing in Ohio House committee

By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural & Resource Law Program

The Agriculture and Rural Development Committee in the Ohio House of Representatives completed its third hearing regarding Senate Bill 57 on Tuesday. The bill would decriminalize hemp produced under the regulatory system proposed in the bill. The committee heard testimony from nearly two dozen individuals and organization representatives.

None of the witnesses gave testimony in opposition to the bill. Nearly all of the testimony, including the testimony given on behalf of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation and Ohio Chamber of Commerce, was offered in support of the bill. The Ohio Farmers Union submitted testimony only as an “interested party” rather than as a “proponent,” saying that it supports the principle of hemp decriminalization, but does not believe that the hemp marketing program established in the current version of the bill would be necessary. Click HERE to view the witness testimony regarding Senate Bill 57 on the Ohio General Assembly’s webpage.

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Ohio Corn, soybean and wheat enterprise budgets: Projected returns for 2019

By Barry Ward, Ohio State University Assistant Extension Professor, Leader Production Business Management

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be largely unchanged from last year with slightly higher fertilizer and interest expenses that may increase total costs for some growers. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2019 are projected to range from $356 to $451 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2019 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $210 to $230 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2019 are projected to range from $178 to $219 per acre.

Returns will likely be low to negative for many producers depending on price movement throughout the rest of the year. Grain prices used as assumptions in the 2019 crop enterprise budgets are $3.60/bushel for corn, $8.20/bushel for soybeans and $4.25/bushel for wheat. Projected returns above variable costs (contribution margin) range from $150 to $308 per acre for corn and $144 to $300 per acre for soybeans.

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Head scab update

By Pierce Paul, Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist

In northern Ohio, most of the wheat fields are between Feekes growth stages 9 (full flag leaf emergence) and 10 (boot), with the odd early-planted field or field planted with an early- maturing variety beginning to head-out. In southern Ohio, fields are between Feekes 10 and early flowering (Feekes 10.5.1). For those fields of wheat at flowering and fields of barley heading-out May 20, the risk for head scab is moderate to low, according to the scab forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu) shown here.

However, persistent rainfall and warmer temperatures over the next few days will likely cause the risk to increase as more fields reach anthesis later this week and early next week. Remember, the scab fungus requires moisture in the form of rainfall or high relative humidity and warm temperatures to produce spores in crop residue, and for those spores to spread to wheat and barley heads, germinate, and infect.

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Late start on planting might not hurt yields much

Despite rain that has stalled the planting of corn and soybeans across the state, yields might not be reduced, according to two grain specialists at The Ohio State University.

That’s because weather later in the growing season can have a bigger impact on yields than the date the seeds go in the ground, said Peter Thomison and Laura Lindsey, both agronomists at Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

During July and August, too much or too little rain or really hot temperatures can be detrimental because that’s when corn plants form kernels and soybean plants form beans, Thomison and Lindsey said.

Only 4% of this year’s corn crop has been planted compared to 50% this time last year; 2% of the soybean crop has been planted compared to 28% this time last year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report released May 13.

During the week that ended May 12, only 1.5 days were suitable for fieldwork due to rain or ground saturation.

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National Pork Board uncovers what diners crave

The National Pork Board released its latest findings from the comprehensive Insight to Action research, this time examining trends in consumer behavior related to dining out. With a shifting dining out landscape and multicultural cuisine trends on the rise in the U.S., the Pork Board set out to understand the needs, considerations and motivations that impact out-of-home dining decisions.

The Pork Board’s All About Dining Out: What’s on Trend report uncovers why consumers decide to eat the proteins they do and explores tactics so that foodservice operators can meet those needs, such as exploring new flavors, dishes and menu formats. Similar to the Pork Board’s findings from the previous report, Dinner at Home in America, there is an overarching high level of consumer satisfaction with dishes that feature pork, pointing to opportunity for incorporating pork in new ways on menus.

“With rapidly changing innovations, technology and competition, foodservice providers who truly understand what diners want — and deliver on it — will stand the test of time,” said Steve Rommereim, president of the National Pork Board’s board of directors.

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MADE on the Farm returns to Ross County

The Ross County Farm Bureau will once again host MADE on the Farm to benefit the nationally recognized program MADE (My Attitude Determines Everything), a group of Ross County students that is part of the regional Drug Free Clubs of America organization.

“MADE has been hugely successful on a local level teaching kids about drugs and bringing awareness to the community, and the community has stood behind their efforts,” said Greg Corcoran, president of the Ross County Farm Bureau. “We saw this as an opportunity so we reached out to them and asked how we can take part and help and that is why the very first MADE on the Farm event was organized last year. We are excited to continue this partnership.”

The 2018 MADE on the Farm effort was recognized with an Achievement Award from the Ohio Farm Bureau, showcasing the most outstanding county-led outreach programs in the state.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Slow and Wet

Very slow planting progress continued this week as rains hindered spring progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 1.9 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 19. Soils started to dry out at the beginning of the week, however, significant rain fell at the end of the week which stopped planting. Producers continued to have problems getting into the fields to plant due to wet soil conditions. Some corn and soybean planting and field preparation was done where conditions allowed, but for most, dryer, warmer weather was needed. Other activities included manure, fertilizers, herbicides application along with more air fertilizer applications for winter wheat.

Ohio Crop Progress coverage on Ohio Ag Net sponsored by Bane-Welker.

Click here to read the full report

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Agriculture cheers rollback of tariffs that bolsters USMCA chances

On May 17 the Trump administration announced plans to lift the 25% tariff on steel and the 10% duty on aluminum imports imposed last year on Canada and Mexico. Both countries subsequently retaliated against a host of U.S. products. The turmoil has slowed passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

“Today’s lifting of steel and aluminum tariffs on Mexican and Canadian imports and the elimination of retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural products by Mexico and Canada is welcome news,’ said Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation. “Retaliatory tariffs are a drag on American farmers and ranchers at a time when they are suffering more economic difficulty than many can remember. Elimination of these tariffs should help pave the way for approval of the USMCA by Congress. Likewise, keeping an eye on today’s deal should address concerns about dumping and unfair subsidies.

“With this milestone reached, we urge negotiators to continue their work toward re-opening markets with the European Union, China and Japan.

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USDA announces full access for U.S. beef in Japan

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that Japan has agreed to eliminate longstanding restrictions on U.S. beef exports, including the 30-month cattle age limit for the first time since 2003.

“This is great news for American ranchers and exporters who now have full access to the Japanese market for their high-quality, safe, wholesome, and delicious U.S. beef,” Secretary Perdue said. “We are hopeful that Japan’s decision will help lead other markets around the world toward science-based policies.”

At the G-20 Agriculture Ministerial Meeting in Niigata, Japan, Secretary Perdue met with Japanese government officials and affirmed the importance of science-based trade rules. The new terms, which take effect immediately, allow U.S. products from all cattle, regardless of age, to enter Japan for the first time since 2003.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that this expanded access could increase U.S. beef and beef product exports to Japan by up to $200 million annually.

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USDA enhances African Swine Fever surveillance efforts

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is furthering its overall African Swine Fever (ASF) preparedness efforts with the implementation of a surveillance plan. As part of this plan, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will work with the swine industry, the states, and veterinary diagnostic laboratories to test for ASF.

ASF is a highly contagious and deadly disease affecting both domestic and feral (wild) pigs. It does not affect human health and cannot be transmitted from pigs to humans. ASF has never been detected in the United States.

“African Swine Fever is an area of high interest among the veterinary community and our swine industry, and we continue to take action to prepare for this deadly disease,” said Greg Ibach, Undersecretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs. “While we are confident that our overlapping safeguards will continue to keep ASF out of the United States, an enhanced surveillance program will serve as an early warning system, helping us find any potential disease much more quickly.

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Ohio Farm Bureau launches new online safety program for farmers

Nearly everyone in Ohio’s agriculture community knows someone who has been seriously injured or who has perished from an on-farm related incident. While fatalities in farming activities have declined over the last few years, the ultimate goal is to eliminate farm-related accidents altogether. That’s the vision of Ohio Farm Bureau’s Cultivating Safe Farm Operations eLearning Safety Series, a new, interactive, engaging and accessible online education program developed for a broad audience of farmers, workers and on-farm youth to make real changes in their farm safety habits.

Developed in partnership with Nationwide and Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Science’s Ag Safety and Health Program, the online safety series offers three 40-minute modules for learners and covers several basic agricultural risks. Each module integrates an assessment into the online platform to assure basic comprehension, which will help cultivate on-farm behavior modification.

To access the modules, prospective learners must create an account through the Farm Bureau University platform, which is provided in partnership with American Farm Bureau Federation and includes additional self-directed learning opportunities.

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Windows for planting expected in coming weeks

By Jim Noel, NOAA

After a wet spring was forecasted since January, it appeared in April that a window would open in May. The rain total window has however, the frequency window has not. The rainfall the last two weeks in Ohio has averaged 1.5 to 2.5 inches with some streaks above 3 inches and some below 1.5 inches. Normal for this period is 1.5 to 2.0 inches. The reality is the ground is just so wet from the wet period up to May. The other BIG key is the frequency of the wet weather.

Often, when it is wet in say the eastern U.S., it is dry in the western U.S. The opposite also holds true. However, we have a very active and progressive weather pattern all around the northern hemisphere. This means a lot of weak to moderate storms on a continuous basis. It is not just Ohio either.

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Trade assistance must help all affected farmers

Following the recent escalation of trade tensions between China and the United States that will likely exacerbate the erosion of agricultural export markets and further depress commodity prices, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is expected to announce a trade assistance package to support struggling family farmers and ranchers.

In a letter sent to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, National Farmers Union (NFU) provided recommendations for how best to “craft a package that will adequately address the broad, long-term impacts to all of American agriculture.”

“Family farmers and ranchers have borne the brunt of the trade war with China, which has intentionally targeted American agricultural products with retaliatory tariffs. We appreciate the administration’s recent efforts to relieve the immense economic pressure those in the agriculture industry are feeling as a result,” said Roger Johnson, NFU President Roger Johnson. “Though China’s tariffs have specifically targeted soybeans, pork, and sorghum, many other commodities have been impacted, both directly and indirectly.

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