FARMER TO FARMER NETWORK
Home / Featured News / Top Headlines

Top Headlines

Featured Posts (Posts shown below the “Top Posts” on the home page)

Two new OSU Extension soil fertility factsheets available

By Steve Culman, Ohio State University Extension

Two new factsheets summarizing key components of the work to update the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations are now available.

 

Updated Grain Nutrient Removal Rates

How many pounds of nutrients are removed with every bushel of corn, soybean and wheat harvested? This factsheet reports new numbers and shows how nutrient removal rates in harvested grain have decreased over the past 25 years.

For more information: go.osu.edu/grain.

 

Converting Soil Test Values: Mehlich-3, Bray P, Ammonium Acetate

The updated Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations will use the Mehlich-3 extractant as the new standard for fertilizer recommendations. This factsheet provides simple, standardized conversions that allow users to convert back and forth from these different extractants.

For more information: go.osu.edu/mehlich.

Continue reading

Read More »

Timely rains support Ohio Crop Progress

Scattered rain events were beneficial to crops affected by recent extreme hot dry weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 21. Wet conditions prevented some field activities. Corn and soybean conditions were still mostly fair. Wheat harvest progress remained slightly behind last year and the 5-year averages. Producers were waiting for dryer conditions to complete harvesting. Oat harvest began in some areas. Early in the week, conditions were adequate for harvesting before most areas received some rainfall. Hay continued to be cut and bailed. First cuttings were complete and second cuttings were progressing well. Pasture and range conditions were mostly fair. Some pastures showed signs of stress before the rain.

Click here to read the full report, sponsored by Bane-Welker Equipment

Continue reading

Read More »

New data highlights continuing need to fight opioid addiction in rural communities

New data from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration shows that rural communities have the highest death rates nationwide from opioid prescriptions, more than three times the national average.

A previously unreleased database from DEA tracking prescription painkillers showed that the highest per-capita opioid death rates from 2006 to 2012 were in rural communities in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia, with more than three times the national average of 4.6 deaths per 100,000 residents. Thirteen of those counties had an opioid death rate more than eight times the national rate.

Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau, said, “We have seen firsthand the destructive force of opioids in rural communities, and our research shows that three out of four farmers have been impacted. That’s why we stepped up to address this crisis. We stand with the families and communities that have been affected, and we continue the fight against opioid addiction in our partnership with National Farmers Union through our Farm Town Strong campaign.

Continue reading

Read More »

Soybean farmers strategically invest in key supply chain link

As Ohio soybean farmers continue to tackle this year’s unprecedented challenges in growing and marketing a crop, it remains essential to maintain and improve the transportation system used to get their products to markets around the world. With that in mind, the United Soybean Board (USB) recently announced a $2 million allocation to help offset the planning, design, and research costs of deepening the lower Mississippi River from 45 feet to 50 feet.

According to the Soy Transportation Coalition (STC), dredging this part of the river would allow for larger and/or more heavily loaded ships and decrease transportation costs of soybeans from Mississippi Gulf export terminals by 13 cents. This could mean an additional $34 million for Ohio soybean farmers annually as a result of improved basis levels.

The 256-mile stretch of the Mississippi River from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to the Gulf of Mexico accounts for 60% of U.S. soybean exports, along with 59% of corn exports — by far the leading export region for both commodities.

Continue reading

Read More »

Gov. DeWine signs state budget

The Ohio Soybean Association (OSA) applauds the recent passage of the state budget that includes beneficial tax policy changes for farmers, as well as long-term, financial support for water quality and nutrient management programs. OSA’s farmer leaders have been working at the Statehouse throughout the process to ensure its members’ voices are heard.

“We thank the Ohio House, Ohio Senate and Gov. DeWine’s Administration for working with all stakeholders to address water quality,” said Trish Cunningham, OSA Policy Committee Chair. “Water quality has been a high priority for our organization for many years and we believe that H2Ohio is a step in the right direction. I’m also proud to see tax policies that will benefit family farmers who have been hit especially hard this year due to the weather and crop prices.”

The over $200 million H2Ohio fund will be used for agricultural, community and nature water projects to address water quality.

Continue reading

Read More »

USMCA waiting on a House vote

This month, White House Economic Advisor Larry Kudlow said the administration will not submit the formal text of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada (USMCA) agreement for Congressional approval until House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) approves of a vote.

“I remain optimistic that she [Pelosi] will provide a vote. It will happen sometime this summer, hopefully. It could stretch on to the autumn, but I think it will be sooner than that. It’s up to her, not me,” Kudlow told CNBC.

CNBC reported that the White House plans to send the official text to Congress after Sept. 1. Agricultural organizations continue to urge ratification of USMCA and will closely monitor congressional votes on USMCA and continues to urge the administration to complete a trade agreement with Japan and resolve the trade dispute with China.

Continue reading

Read More »

Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) to cost less

By Matthew Diersen, Risk and Business Management Specialist, Ness School of Management & Economics, South Dakota State University

Feeder cattle have been under seasonal price pressure, similar to last year. Thus, locking in cattle prices or spending money for insurance may not be a high priority at this time. However, it is never a bad time to plan nor to look for cost-effective ways to manage risk. Livestock Risk Protection (LRP), price coverage sold by insurance agents, is similar to the purchase of put options on cattle futures contracts. LRP is administered by the Risk Management Agency (RMA) with a federally-subsidized premium that is set to increase soon.

Interest in and usage of LRP has fluctuated since first being offered in the early 2000s. Nationally, coverage with the feeder cattle endorsement peaked at over 300,000 head in crop year 2014. Such a total was still less than 1% of the U.S.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio budget passed by legislators

The Ohio House and Senate passed a state budget bill July 17.

After a 17-day extension, the conference committee sorted out the House and Senate versions of the budget, finally agreeing to 4% income tax cut and funding for Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio Initiative.

“Farm Bureau applauds the Ohio House and Senate for including two of our highest priority issues, preservation of the business income deduction and a collaborative plan to address water quality challenges through Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio Initiative, in the state’s operating budget,” said Adam Sharp, Executive Vice President, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. “Farm Bureau also appreciates the funding increases for our partners at the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Extension Services, and Soil and Water Conservation Districts, all of whom deliver critical information to our farmers regarding best practices.”

The budget now goes to Gov. DeWine for a signature.

Continue reading

Read More »

Tax planning in an unusual year — Prevented planting indemnity payments, Market Facilitation payments and cost-share payments

By Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management & Director, Ohio State University Income Tax Schools

With unprecedented amounts of prevented planting insurance claims this year in Ohio and other parts of the Midwest, many producers will be considering different tax management strategies in dealing with this unusual income stream. In a normal year, producers have flexibility in how they generate and report income. In a year such as this when they will have a large amount of income from insurance indemnity payments the flexibility is greatly reduced. In a normal year a producer may sell a part of grain produced in the year of production and store the remainder until the following year to potentially take advantage of higher prices and/or stronger basis. For example, a producer harvests 200,000 bushels of corn in 2019, sells 100,000 bushels this year and the remainder in 2020. As most producers use the cash method of accounting and file taxes as a cash based filer, the production sold in the following year is reported as income in that year and not in the year of production.

Continue reading

Read More »

Frobose selected #RealPigFarming Student Social Forces team

The Pork Checkoff has selected 13 college students to represent the #RealPigFarming Student Social Forces team this year. Candidates were selected based on their involvement in the pork industry and their strong communication skills.  The 2019 class of Social Forces includes Hunter Frobose from Wood County who is attending Ohio State University.

“Social media is ingrained in young people’s lives,” said Claire Masker, director of sustainability communications for the Pork Checkoff. “It’s an easy tool for them to share their insights and inspiration about an industry that they are so proud to be a part of. With so many diverse social media channels, they each have an opportunity to share their passion for pig farming with their followers.”

The team will be active July through December.

“Consumers continue to have questions about how pigs are raised, and pig farmers know the answers better than anyone else,” Masker said. “Through the Pork Checkoff’s social media outreach program, real farmers are sharing their real stories with consumers through #RealPigFarming.”

The hashtag (#) before RealPigFarming helps people search social media posts with the same phrase, making it easier for them to follow conversations, Masker said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Public Notice by the Ohio Pork Council and the National Pork Board

The election of pork producer delegate candidates for the 2020 National Pork Producers (Pork Act) Delegate Body will take place at 12 p.m. on Tuesday, August 14, 2019 in conjunction with the Ohio Pork Council Board of Directors meeting at the Mohican State Park Lodge, 3116 OH-3, Loudonville Ohio. All Ohio pork producers are invited to attend.

Any producer, age 18 or older, who is a resident of the state and has paid all assessments due may be considered as a delegate candidate and/or participate in the election. All eligible producers are encouraged to bring with them a sales receipt proving that hogs were sold in their name and the checkoff deducted.

For more information, contact the Ohio Pork Council Office, 9798 Karmar Ct. Suite A, New Albany OH 43054, 614-882-5887.

 

Continue reading

Read More »

Noxious weeds in cover crop seed and seed germination

By Alexander Lindsey, Laura Lindsey, Mark Loux, Anne Dorrance, Stan Smith, John Armstrong, Ohio State University Extension

Seed quality is key to establishing a good crop (or cover crop). Some of the critical components of seed quality are percent germination, mechanical analysis for purity (% other crops, % inert, and % weeds), and a listing of noxious weeds identified by scientific/common name and quantity found. As producers are looking for seed sources to provide living cover on acreage this year that was previously earmarked for corn or soybeans, it is important to pay attention to the quality. These tests may also be required on seed lots for use in some relief programs as well. Commercial or certified seed used for cover crops should have a seed tag that shows variety and the seed quality measurements above. However, if the seed is sourced from out of state, the noxious weeds listed (or NOT listed) on the tag by name may differ from those had the seed been sourced from Ohio.

Continue reading

Read More »

USDA offers low-interest loans for Ohio agricultural producers impacted by natural disasters

Ohio agricultural producers who lost property due to recent natural disasters may be eligible for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) physical loss loans. The Farm Service Agency (FSA) offers these low-interest loans to agricultural producers in 21 Ohio counties, the primary damaged area, who incurred losses due excessive rain, flash flooding, flooding, hail, high winds, lightning and tornadoes that occurred between Nov. 1, 2018 and June 13, 2019. Approval is limited to applicants who suffered severe physical losses only, including the loss of buildings and livestock. Applications are due March 2, 2020.

“Ohio’s hardworking ag producers feed our neighbors, the nation and the world,” said Leonard Hubert, state executive director. “When they suffer losses because of extreme weather, helping them get back on their feet is important. We encourage those affected to reach out to their local USDA Service Center to apply for these emergency loans.”

The 21 Ohio counties in the primary damaged areas include Athens, Auglaize, Belmont, Crawford, Darke, Greene, Guernsey, Henry, Highland, Hocking, Jackson, Mercer, Miami, Monroe, Montgomery, Noble, Pickaway, Preble, Richland, Shelby, and Stark.

Continue reading

Read More »

USDA now making Dairy Margin Coverage Program payments

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) opened enrollment for the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program on June 17 and has started issuing payments to producers who purchased coverage. Producers can enroll through Sept. 20, 2019.

“Times have been especially tough for dairy farmers, and while we hope producers’ margins will increase, the Dairy Margin Coverage program is providing support at a critical time for many in the industry,” said Bill Northey, USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation. “With lower premiums and higher levels of assistance than previous programs, DMC is already proving to be a good option for a lot of dairy producers across the country.  USDA is committed to efficiently implementing the safety net programs in the 2018 Farm Bill and helping producers deal with the challenges of the ever-changing farm economy.”

Authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill, DMC replaces the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy).

Continue reading

Read More »

First DMC payments providing critical aid to dairy farmers

The National Milk Producers Federation thanked the U.S. Department of Agriculture for meeting the timeline Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue promised in February for dairy-program payments under the 2018 farm bill. Dairy farmers began receiving checks under the new Dairy Margin Coverage program last week, in keeping with USDA’s pledge.

“DMC aid represents significant improvement from previous programs, and with dairy farmers facing a fifth year of low prices, receiving better assistance in a timely fashion is a matter of survival for some family farms,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of the NMPF. “The DMC program doesn’t replace a healthy market, but it is a crucial safety net in turbulent times. All dairy producers should strongly consider enrolling, and to look closely at coverage at the $9.50 maximum level.”

More than one-fourth of all U.S. dairy farms — nearly 10,000 — have signed up for DMC since signups began June 17, according to USDA.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio farm featured on PBS series

Ohio’s Laurel Valley Creamery will be featured nationwide with the broadcast premiere of Farmsteaders on POV on Sept. 2, an award-winning PBS series.

Farmsteaders brings to light various factors related to dairy farm management, livestock and challenges to farming practices. Director Shaena Mallett documents the intimate experiences and continuing struggle of the Nolan family farm, operating at the mercy of the “unknown.”

Farmsteaders follows Nick Nolan and his young family on a journey to resurrect his late grandfather’s dairy farm. Nick and his wife Celeste fight to keep their farm from “drying up and blowing away,” something that has happened to about 4.7 million farms in the U.S. Through beauty and hardship, Farmsteaders points an honest and tender lens at everyday life in rural America, offering an unexpected voice for a forsaken people: those who grow the food that sustains us.

Farmsteaders will premiere on POV on Sept. 2 at 10 p.m.

Continue reading

Read More »

Large algae bloom in Lake Erie predicted for 2019

NOAA and its research partners are forecasting that western Lake Erie will experience a significant harmful algal bloom (HAB) this summer.

This year’s bloom is expected to measure 7.5 on the severity index, but could possibly range between 6 and 9. An index above 5 indicates blooms having greater impact. The severity index is based on bloom’s biomass — the amount of algae — over a sustained period. The largest blooms occurred in 2011, with a severity index of 10, and 2015, at 10.5. Last year’s bloom had a severity index of 3.6, while 2017‘s was 8.0.

Lake Erie blooms consist of cyanobacteria, also called blue-green algae, that are capable of producing the liver toxin microcystin that poses a risk to human and wildlife health. Such blooms may result in higher costs for cities and local governments that need to treat drinking water, prevent people from enjoying fishing, swimming, boating and visiting the shoreline, and harm the region’s vital summer tourism economy.

Continue reading

Read More »

Soybean problems showing up

By Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist

We have multiple planting dates in Ohio this year with soybeans in all different growth stages. This can create challenges when management decisions are based on the stage of crop development.

For soybeans that are flowering, there was a confirmed report of frogeye leaf spot. If the soybeans in the field are in good health then managing this disease is often cost effective on susceptible varieties. Scouting between R2/R3, if frogeye is easy to find on the newly expanded leaves a fungicide application is warranted. There are many fungicides available with fair to very good efficacy. The one caveat is in Ohio we have identified strains of the fungus that causes frogeye leaf spot that is resistant to strobilurin fungicides, so choose a product that has another mode-of-action.

For soybeans that are in the early seedling stages that have continued to get these saturating rains, damping-off is occurring.

Continue reading

Read More »

Gov. DeWine creates “Expo 2050” Task Force

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced a new task force to develop and recommend a long-term vision for the Ohio Expo Center, an event venue in Columbus that is home to the Ohio State Fair, as well as nearby attractions including the Ohio History Connection and the current Mapfre Stadium.

“At the Ohio State Fair and other events that occur here, there are countless ways to have fun. We need to find ways to keep that excitement going all year long,” Governor DeWine said. “Today, I am announcing the formation of a task force, called ‘Expo 2050,’ to take stock of all of the great things going on at the Ohio Expo Center, as well as the Ohio History Connection and Mapfre Stadium, and to develop a strategic vision for the entire area.”

Governor DeWine made the announcement during a meeting of the Ohio Expositions Commission. Expo 2050 is tasked with reviewing the Expo experience, including the assets and activities of the Ohio Expo Center, the Ohio History Connection, and Mapfre Stadium, and developing ideas for getting the most use and enjoyment out of this state land in the future.

Continue reading

Read More »

USDA extends spring-seeded crop reporting deadline in Ohio, 11 other states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is extending the deadline for agricultural producers in states impacted by flooding and heavy moisture. The new July 22 deadline applies to producers in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, Tennessee and Wisconsin for reporting spring-seeded crops to USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) county offices and crop insurance agents.

“These are challenging times for farmers, and we are here to help,” said Bill Northey, USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation. “This deadline extension is part of our broader effort to increase program flexibility and reduce overall regulatory burden for producers who are having to make some tough choices for their operations.”

Producers not in the selected states must file reports or be added to a county register by the original July 15 deadline.

“While producers in many parts of the country are experiencing a challenging spring and early summer, these states are seeing an especially large number of producers delayed in planting and unable to complete their other fieldwork,” Northey said.

Continue reading

Read More »