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Dairy Margin Coverage program signup deadline extended

The National Milk Producers Federation is urging farmers to take advantage of a one-week extension in the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program signup deadline to Sept. 27, announced by USDA.

“Dairy farmers have much to gain by signing up for this program, and another week to take advantage of this benefit can be nothing but helpful for them,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of NMPF. “We urge producers to take advantage of this added opportunity to sign up.”

The USDA said more than 21,000 dairy farms have signed up for the new program, the main risk-protection tool for dairy farmers enacted in the 2018 Farm Bill, nearing the level that participated last year in the Margin Protection Program, which DMC replaced. DMC is guaranteed to pay all producers enrolled at the maximum $9.50/cwt. coverage level for every month of production through July, according to USDA data. DMC improvements from the MPP include:
• Affordable higher coverage levels that permit all dairy producers to insure margins up to $9.50/cwt.

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How AI and Unmanned Aerial Systems Could Change the Futureof Crop Scouting

Crop scouting may transition from a boots-on-the-ground job to an artificial intelligence endeavor in the sky thanks to research from The Ohio State University (OSU) and investments made by the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) and soybean checkoff. Dr. Scott Shearer, professor and chair of OSU’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, and his team are testing the use of small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) in Ohio fields to automate the scouting process with data collected directly from the crop canopy.

Drone flying over an Ohio soybean field with stinger platform suspended beneath.

To dig deeper, OSC talked with Dr. Shearer about the project and the impact it could have on Ohio agriculture.

Q: Tell us about your current work with AI and sUAS.

A: We have developed a stinger platform suspended beneath a multi-rotor drone, or sUAS, to insert sensors into the crop canopy. These sensors capture high-resolution imagery from within the plant canopy, which can be used for real-time plant stress classification.

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No vote on community rights in Williams County, yet

By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural & Resource Law Program

A proposed county charter for Williams County, Ohio containing language similar to the Lake Erie Bill of Rights may not make it on the November ballot. The Ohio Supreme Court recently refused to compel the Williams County Board of Elections (BOE) to include the charter on the ballot for procedural reasons.

The charter would have declared that the people of Williams County have the right to a healthy environment and sustainable community, and that the Michindoh Aquifer and its ecosystem have the right to exist, flourish, evolve, regenerate. Further, the aquifer would have the right of restoration, recovery, and preservation, including the right to be free from interferences such as the extraction, sale, lease, transportation, or distribution of water outside of the aquifer’s boundary.

Even though the petition to put the charter on the ballot had enough signatures, the BOE believed that the language of the charter violated Ohio law, and therefore exercised its power to reject the petition and keep it off the ballot.

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Managing take-all and other diseases in wheat after wheat

By Pierce Paul, Ohio State University Extension

I never recommend planting a small grain crop after another small grain crop, as planting wheat after barley for instance or barley after wheat increases the risk of diseases such as head scab and take-all. However, this year, some growers do not have much of a choice; soybean will not be harvested in time in some fields for them to plant wheat, so they will either have plant wheat after corn harvested for silage or after wheat. If you do end up planting wheat after corn or wheat, here are a few tips that could help to reduce the risk of having major disease problems next spring:

  1. Select and plant the most resistant variety that you can find. Check the Ohio Wheat Performance Trials report (https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/wheattrials/table6.asp?year=2019), and select a variety with resistance to as many diseases as possible. Give priority to head scab, Stagonospora, and powdery mildew resistance.
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Listen to the Agronomy and Farm Management Podcast while driving to the 37th Farm Science Review

If you are heading down to the 37th Annual Farm Science Review, listen to the Agronomy and Farm Management Podcast on the way! We interviewed the FSR manager, Nick Zachrich, about what is new this year and also talked to the farm manager, Nate Douridas, on what will be featured in the field demonstrations. You can also learn about all the areas where Extension brings you resources, presentations, demos and more. Check it out https://agcrops.osu.edu/video/agronomy-and-farm-management-podcast.

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Corn observations can save harvest time

By Luke Schulte, Beck’s Hybrids

Walking corn throughout the past few weeks has revealed a significant number of fields showing nitrogen (N) deficiency. Several factors have contributed to these N shortages, but what is imminent is that stalk strength and standability will likely be compromised in these situations.

Contributing factors of N shortage include:

  • There were less than ideal planting conditions resulting in poor root structure.
  • Tillage performed in wet conditions has created a density layer for root restriction. This has also led to decreased aggregate stability and poorer water infiltration.
  • There were dry conditions during the rapid N-uptake period. Beginning at approximately V8-V10, N uptake is approximately 7 pounds per day for three weeks. The majority of N is mobilized into the plant with water.
  • There was the potential for significant N loss with pre-plant or early N applications.

Beginning at approximately the R2 growth stage (kernel blister), the corn plant begins to remobilize most of the necessary N for grain fill from the stalk and leaves.

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Back-to-school recipes featuring eggs

With school back in session and families establishing new routines, EGGsperts from some of the nation’s top egg farming states, including the Ohio Egg Marketing Program, and top food bloggers have come together to share easy, kid-friendly dinner recipes to keep weeknights stress-free. Dish on Eggs offers 24 simple dinner recipes, starring the incredible egg, that are sure to please even the pickiest eaters. As part of the campaign, consumers can also enter to win a free year’s supply of eggs and download a free e-cookbook at www.DishOnEggs.com.

“Using eggs to make dinner on school nights is a smart choice because of their extreme versatility,” said Jim Chakeres, executive vice president of the Ohio Egg Marketing Program. “Eggs are easy to make and are the perfect addition to dozens of favorite kids’ recipes like the pizza and tacos featured by Dish on Eggs.”

Participating organizations in the back-to-school recipe exchange include: the Ohio Egg Marketing Program (OH), Iowa Egg Council (IA), Pacific Egg and Poultry Association (CA), North Carolina Egg Association (NC), Virginia Egg Council (VA), Chicken & Egg Association of Minnesota (MN), Michigan Allied Poultry Industries (MI), and the Colorado Egg Producers (CO).

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YAP award winners announced

The Ohio Farm Bureau Young Agricultural Professionals program recently announced award winners for their 2019 contests. Program participants are ages 18 to 35, single or married, who are interested in improving the business of agriculture, learning new ideas and developing leadership skills.

Matt Vodraska of Doylestown has been named the winner of Ohio Farm Bureau Federation’s 2019 Outstanding Young Farmer Award. In addition, Kyle and Ashton Walls of Mt. Vernon have been named winners of Ohio Farm Bureau Federation’s 2019 Excellence in Agriculture Award.

The Outstanding Young Farmer contest is designed to help young farmers strengthen their business skills, develop marketing opportunities and receive recognition for their accomplishments. Contestants are judged on the growth of their farm businesses and involvement in Farm Bureau and their community.

Vodraska won 250 hours free use of an M-series tractor provided by Kubota, $1,000 in Grainger merchandise sponsored by Farm Credit Mid-America and an expense-paid trip to the 2020 American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention in Austin, Texas, in January where he will participate in the national competition.

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OCWGA hires Crumley

The Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association (OCWGA) welcomes Lucas P. Crumley as director of public policy and nutrient management. In this role Crumley will oversee legislative activities and will manage nutrient management issues for the organization.

“Advocating for good policy is a fundamental reason our organization exists,” said Tadd Nicholson, the executive director of OCWGA. “Luke brings with him a strong foundation and extensive government experience, a great network and a diverse set of experiences that will benefit Ohio Corn & Wheat. With nutrient management issues becoming more complex, we look forward to having Luke spearhead oversight of these issues.”

Prior to joining OCW, Crumley worked for two members of congress, advocating for local community initiatives, building coalition groups, and overseeing constituent services. He has been active in flood prevention and water management projects across central Ohio. From 2007 to 2011, Crumley served as a commissioned officer in the United States Marine Corps, deploying twice with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit.

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New soybean grain system promotes greater efficiency

R & C Rivers Farms has 850,000 bushels of corn storage capacity at their main operation in Mount Sterling. But for soybeans, they’ve relied on 30 smaller bins at their other farm sites in Pickaway, Fayette and Madison counties.

“It wasn’t a very efficient system and made hauling the grain too complex,” said Brent Rivers, the owner. “So, we decided to build a new soybean grain system to be more productive.”

Designed and built by local GSI dealer, Sims Construction, the new system is located about a quarter mile away from the main operation. It includes:

  • Two 160,000-bushel capacity dry storage bins with fans to aerate the grain.
  • A grain handling system that includes a conveyor, grain leg and bucket elevator to transfer harvested grain from a dump site to the storage bins at the rate of 12,000 to 14,000 bushels per hour.
  • And a 5,000-bushel capacity overhead hopper tank that can fill a 1,000-bushel semi-truck for grain delivery in just 4 to 5 minutes.
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Sorting out herbicide resistant traits in soybeans

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension

The world of soybean herbicide resistance traits has gotten more complex over the past several years. The good news is that we have new options for control of herbicide-resistant weeds, although it can be a little difficult to sort out which one is best for a given situation and whether the possible downsides of certain traits are tolerable. The following is a quick rundown of what’s available and some things to consider when selecting seed. This is not meant to be an extensive evaluation/description of these systems because including all the possible configurations of herbicide use and the stewardship stuff would probably kill the possibility that anyone reads the rest of the article. We also do not attempt to include all of the possible seed trade names. For ratings of herbicide effectiveness on certain weeds, check the tables in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.”

 

Roundup Ready (RR1, RR 2 Yield, etc.) – the original herbicide resistance trait.

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New law bulletin explains the new hemp frontier

By Ellen Essman, Senior Research Associate, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural & Resource Law Program

These days, industrial hemp never seems to leave the news. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit declined to decide a case involving the interstate shipment of hemp between Oregon and Colorado by way of Idaho. Hemp is illegal in Idaho, where the product was seized and the driver was arrested, even though the 2018 Farm Bill allows for the interstate transportation of hemp. The Ninth Circuit, reviewing the case, determined that the state court actions needed to be decided before federal courts could hear the case. Ohio also made news this summer when the state passed a bill legalizing hemp in the state.

All of these developments involving industrial hemp may leave you with many questions. What is hemp? What did the 2018 Farm Bill do? What does Ohio’s new law do? Most importantly, can I grow and process hemp right now?

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The new (dis)order in today’s markets could favor livestock profitability

By Abbie Burnett, production communications specialist for Certified Angus Beef

In a third of the world’s economies today banks charge customers to keep money in savings. This and other disincentives to save has brought world economic debt to record levels, and the U.S. at $23 trillion holds the largest share of the $243 trillion total.

“Economic and political order has become disorder,” said Dan Basse, AgResource president, in market analysis comments at the 2019 Feeding Quality Forum in Amarillo, Texas.

The pressure is on to put money to work in those economies, even to the point of devaluing the money,

“In agriculture, everybody is dropping their currencies so they have a competitive edge in producing more supply,” Basse said. “This is what’s giving us a supply bear market in the grains.”

“It’s really why interest rates cannot rise. So, we are kind of locked into this environment of debt and low growth.”

Enter the Chinese economy.

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Ag pushing for USMCA passage

U.S. agriculture is making a big push to encourage Congress to move forward with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

Adopted to upgrade the North American Free Trade Agreement, USMCA was signed on Nov. 30, 2018. Mexico’s Senate ratified the trade deal in June, but legislation for USMCA has not been introduced in the United States Congress or in Canada. On Sept. 12, Farmers for Free Trade, Farm Bureau, American Soybean Association, National Corn Growers, US Apple Association, National Milk Producers Federation, U.S. Dairy Export Council, Corn Refiners Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, Distilled Spirits Council of the U.S. and other American agriculture leaders joined with bipartisan members of Congress to rally for USMCA passage that is viewed as essential by much of agriculture.

“We need Congress to pass the USMCA trade agreement to bring certainty to our already-positive trade relationship with our closest neighbors and build on that relationship with new opportunities and commitments.

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A loss for Ohio agriculture after Fledderjohann killed in automobile accident

According to troopers from the Wapakoneta Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol, Jordan Fledderjohann, 26, died at Mercer Health in Coldwater on Sept. 11 after an automobile accident at the intersection of U.S. Route 127 and Cover Four Road in Mercer County.

Fledderjohann, from Botkins, will be remembered by many for his incredible success showing market goats at the Ohio State Fair and nationally. He had the Grand Champion Market Goat in 2011, the first year a market goat was sold in the Sale of Champions. Both before and after that, he was a staple at the Ohio State Fair and other goat shows as he worked with many exhibitors to help them succeed. Here is a clip with Fledderjohann from the 2011 Ohio State Fair Sale of Champions.  

 

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Lack of investment in aging U.S waterways threatens $72 billion in GDP growth

U.S. farmers have enjoyed a competitive advantage in accessing the global export market with their products, but continued underinvestment in the aging inland waterways system will limit U.S. agricultural exports, and during the next 25 years, could put more than $72 billion in additional GDP and 77,000 new jobs at risk, a new report from Agribusiness Intelligence found.

That independent report, Importance of Inland Waterways to U.S. Agriculture, was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service earlier in the year from Agribusiness Intelligence.

“The U.S. is in direct competition with Brazil for its agricultural export business, particularly for corn and soybeans — two of our largest exports, therefore, infrastructure investments can have a tremendous impact upon a farmer’s profitability,” said Ken Eriksen, senior vice president of Agribusiness Intelligence’s consulting business and lead author of the study. “Multinational corporations, including Chinese companies, are making significant investments in the Brazilian grain and soybean transportation and handling systems.

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Nominate an ag teach for the Golden Owl Award

Presented by Nationwide, the Ohio FFA and the Ohio Farm Bureau, the Golden Owl Award recognizes agricultural educators across Ohio for their tremendous contributions to helping the next generation of agricultural leaders. Students, fellow teachers and other supporters can nominate their favorite agricultural teacher and summarize what makes him or her the best in the state.

Nominees have an opportunity to win great cash prizes and the distinction of being Ohio’s Agricultural Educator of the Year. Prizes include:

  • $500 and an engraved plaque for each of the 10 honorees
  • $3,000 for the Golden Owl Award winner (Ohio Agricultural Educator of the Year).

To nominate someone for the Golden Owl Award visit pages-nationwide.com/OWL_2019/. This year’s nominations must be submitted by Nov. 16, 2019.

John Poulson, a local agriculture teacher at Pettisville High School in Fulton County was honored as the 2018-2019 Ohio Ag Educator of the Year presented by the inaugural Golden Owl Award.

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Planting alternative grasses that can handle abundant rain

Farm animals want to eat what they’re used to.

And because livestock are not adventurous eaters, farmers have to train them to try something new by limiting their access to the food they’re most familiar with. That can be done by growing new grasses in a different field, and then moving the livestock to graze on that field.

Many farmers in Ohio might be trying to grow and feed their animals different grasses this year, as supplies for hay and traditional forage grasses are exceptionally low. Ohio’s hay supply is the lowest since the 2012 drought, and the fourth lowest in 70 years. This past spring was persistently wet, which hindered the growth and cutting of hay and other forage grasses.

“Nobody can control the weather, but we can somewhat control what we’re growing on the farm,” said Christine Gelley, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Noble County. “If we can become more flexible in terms of what we grow and how we move our animals around, that can increase our options for feeding them.”

Gelley hosted a talk on how to do that: “Forages for the Extremes — Drought and Flood Tolerant Options” on Sept.

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USDA resources available for 2018 and 2019 disasters for farms

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced this week that agricultural producers affected by natural disasters in 2018 and 2019, including Hurricane Dorian, can apply for assistance through the Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus (WHIP+). Signup for this U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) program begins Sept. 11, 2019.

“U.S. agriculture has been dealt a hefty blow by extreme weather over the last several years, and 2019 is no exception,” Perdue said. “The scope of this year’s prevented planting alone is devastating, and although these disaster program benefits will not make producers whole, we hope the assistance will ease some of the financial strain farmers, ranchers and their families are experiencing.”

More than $3 billion is available through the disaster relief package passed by Congress and signed by President Trump in early June. WHIP+ builds on the successes of its predecessor program the 2017 Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program (2017 WHIP) that was authorized by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018.

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Viral disease limits All American Quarter Horse Congress participation

In an effort to protect horses and other livestock in Ohio, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is not allowing the import of horses from counties within states with confirmed and suspected cases of Vesicular Stomatitis (VSV). This restriction includes the All American Quarter Horse Congress, which is scheduled to begin in Columbus on Oct. 1.

“VSV has not been detected in Ohio and we are taking every precaution possible to keep it that way,” said ODA State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey. “With the All American Quarter Horse Congress coming, we thought it was important to restrict further movement to prevent the disease’s potential spread.”

VSV is a viral disease that primarily affects horses, but can also infect cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. The disease causes blister-like lesions, which burst and leave open wounds. It is extremely painful to animals and can result in the inability to eat and drink and even lameness.

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