Home / Livestock (page 98)

Livestock



Free lecture series for shepherds

The Spicy Lamb Farm, a Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP) farm dedicated to educating the public on the critical need for local sustainable farming and environmental stewardship, is proud to announce a free spring lecture series.

These lectures will take place on Wednesday nights from April 25th to May 23rd at 7pm. Seating is limited to 56.  The Spicy Lamb Farm is located in Peninsula, Ohio just off the intersection of Route 8 near the Ohio Turnpike I-80 interchange. Take the Boston Mills exit from Route 8. The farm is at the dead end of Akron Peninsula Road off of Boston Mills Road. For more information go to www.thespicylamb.com

  • April 25 – Getting Started as a Shepherd: This presentation will provide an overview of what you need to start a flock and how to get advice about your sheep. Lessons learned will be shared.
  • May 9th –   Religious Care for the Environment: “Dominion” has been seen as a cause of the ecological crisis.
Continue reading

Read More »

USDA gives assistance to Ohio for phosphorus prevention

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced $2 million in financial assistance through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program to help farmers in designated parts of Michigan, Ohio and Indiana prevent phosphorus from entering Western Lake Erie Basin waterways.  The announcement is part of an effort to improve water quality and support jobs in the region that are generated through the hunting, fishing, and outdoor recreation industry. Secretary Vilsack was joined by U.S. Senators Debbie Stabenow (MI) and Sherrod Brown (OH), and Representatives John Dingell (MI) and Marcy Kaptur (OH) for the announcement.

“Our nation’s farmers and ranchers are a tremendous partner in helping protect the environment and this initiative gives them an additional opportunity to help address the challenges phosphorus poses to water quality in the basin,” Vilsack said. “This funding will help farmers take necessary steps to improve and protect the environmental health of the Lake Erie Basin, preserve habitat for the region’s fish and wildlife, and protect over 100,000 jobs that Lake Erie helps support.”

Senator Stabenow, Chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry said: “Protecting our Great Lakes, waterways and natural resources is critical for Michigan’s economy and our way of life.… Continue reading

Read More »

Beef Expo celebrates 25 years

The Ohio Beef Expo held a ceremony recognizing its 25th anniversary in Cooper Arena on the Ohio Expo Center grounds. Ohio Department of Agriculture Director David T. Daniels, Ohio Expo Center General Manager Virgil Strickler, Ohio Beef Expo Chairman and OCA President Sam Sutherly, Ohio Beef Expo Vice Chairman Bill Sexton, first Ohio Beef Expo Chairman Jim Rentz and 1988 OCA President Henry Bergfeld were all in attendance for the event.

The ceremony recognized exhibitors from the trade show and cattle events that have

participated in all 25 Expos, including Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net.

And, as the Ohio Beef Expo celebrates its 25th anniversary, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association would like to express its sincerest thanks to all of the volunteers who have been involved in this annual industry event. Each year, dedicated volunteers spend countless hours ensuring the success of the Ohio Beef Expo. In an effort to show the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s sincere appreciation for those who have dedicated themselves over the years, the Ohio Beef Expo Planning Committee presents the Friend of the Expo award to three worthy recipients who like many others have contributed to the success of the past 25 years of Expo.… Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio agencies announce water quality measures

The Directors’ Agricultural Nutrients and Water Quality Working Group spent months compiling their extensive findings on how agriculture is contributing to water quality problems and how this can be controlled. The group was assembled to aggregate all of the available information on the problem, organize it and present it to the directors of the Ohio Department of Agriculture, the Department of Natural Resources and the Environmental Protection Agency, who will then make recommendations to the governor.

The three Departments today announced their recommendations for reducing excess agricultural nutrients from affecting or entering the western basin of Lake Erie.

“Our agencies worked with Ohio’s agricultural community to identify the best ways to decrease this nutrient loading into Ohio’s water bodies,” said David Daniels, director of the ODA. “The farmers, private companies, agricultural organizations, agri-businesses, environmental organizations and academic institutions were all asked to provide their best input, ideas, advice and guidance.… Continue reading

Read More »

NCBA Pushes for Beef Checkoff Reform

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today, March 14, 2012, submitted comments on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service proposed rule  pertaining to the Beef Checkoff Program. The proposed rule would expand contracting authority by eliminating the requirement that only allows organizations active and ongoing since 1985 to contract with the checkoff. The proposed rule would allow national non-profit, industry-governed organizations that have been representing the cattle industry for at least two years to be eligible to contract for the implementation of checkoff programs.

NCBA President J.D. Alexander said the rule is good for the industry and good for the checkoff. He said the proposed rule would ensure cattlemen are getting the best return on their investment.

“NCBA supports an open and transparent checkoff program that is producer driven. This proposed rule would simply enhance this quest,” said Alexander. “We support a competitive checkoff contracting system that ensures producers are getting the absolute best return on their investment.… Continue reading

Read More »

Meat exports holding strong

U.S. red meat exports have a tough act to follow after a record-setting year in 2011, but the early indications for 2012 are good. January pork exports jumped 28% in volume and 43% in value while beef exports were even in volume but rose 14% in value, according to statistics released by the USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF).

“There is a challenge to follow a very successful year like 2011 and sustain the momentum,” said Philip Seng, USMEF president and CEO. “The good news is that there are opportunities to expand the presence of U.S. red meat by exploring new market niches as well as increasing access with several key trading partners.”

Several key measurements also showed continued growth: export value per head and percentage of total production exported. For pork, January’s export value equated to $59.44 per head of commercial slaughter compared to $43.59 a year ago, and 29.6% of total production (including variety meat) was exported in January versus 24.2% last year.… Continue reading

Read More »

Do homework before buying a bull

Beef producers who want to purchase bulls or semen for their spring breeding herds should be doing their homework now, says a Purdue Extension beef specialist.

Cow-calf producers can take advantage of high market prices by selecting healthy bulls that will produce calves with more growth potential.

“If we can buy bulls that will produce offspring that will be born with a minimum of dystocia, grow a little bit faster, will produce a little bit higher-quality carcass and produce replacement females that perform above average, I think our cow-calf producers have the opportunity to capitalize,” Ron Lemenager said.

Producers can do this by looking at what will affect offspring and doing plenty of research before investing.

“Good bulls come from good cows,” Lemenager said. “So if producers can take a look at mom before they purchase that bull, I think it helps minimize some of the risk.”

But even if the dam looks good and is healthy, a bull’s own merit still needs to be evaluated, starting with reproductive soundness.… Continue reading

Read More »

U.S. to challenge India’s prohibition of U.S. poultry

The USA Poultry & Egg Export Council (USAPEEC), National Chicken Council (NCC) and National Turkey Federation (NTF) applaud announcement by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk that the United States will initiate dispute settlement proceedings against India before the World Trade Organization (WTO) to challenge its longstanding prohibition on the import of U.S. poultry.

For years, India has used a variety of non-tariff trade barriers to deny access U.S. poultry to the Indian market. Although international health standards, in particular those of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), identify only highly pathogenic stains of avian influenza as warranting trade restrictions, India has long ignored those international norms and has banned poultry imports from the United States or any country that reports any incident of avian influenza, even cases of low pathogenicity. This is a protectionist policy that is inconsistent with accepted international standards, and has no health or safety justification. This policy is particularly problematic in the case of the United States, which is the most efficient poultry producer in the world and the world’s leading exporter of poultry products.… Continue reading

Read More »

U.S. to challenge India's prohibition of U.S. poultry

The USA Poultry & Egg Export Council (USAPEEC), National Chicken Council (NCC) and National Turkey Federation (NTF) applaud announcement by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk that the United States will initiate dispute settlement proceedings against India before the World Trade Organization (WTO) to challenge its longstanding prohibition on the import of U.S. poultry.

For years, India has used a variety of non-tariff trade barriers to deny access U.S. poultry to the Indian market. Although international health standards, in particular those of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), identify only highly pathogenic stains of avian influenza as warranting trade restrictions, India has long ignored those international norms and has banned poultry imports from the United States or any country that reports any incident of avian influenza, even cases of low pathogenicity. This is a protectionist policy that is inconsistent with accepted international standards, and has no health or safety justification. This policy is particularly problematic in the case of the United States, which is the most efficient poultry producer in the world and the world’s leading exporter of poultry products.… Continue reading

Read More »

ATI and CAB team up to educate

Nothing can illustrate cattle comfort better than, well, a comfortable cow.

Even the best speakers can’t make an audience feel what it’s like on a farm. There are no words that can replace the actual experience of seeing cattle first hand — watching them roam the pasture or eat out of the feedbunk.

That’s why Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) has a newfound tradition of sorts. Nearly every time sales partners travel to the Wooster, Ohio-based headquarters for training and education, the company takes them on a field trip. The Grace L. Drake Agriculture Laboratory, part of the Ohio State University’s Agriculture Technical Institute (ATI), just miles from the CAB office, is run as a for-profit, working farm.

“The more our licensees know about the production side of the beef business, the better it will make them at selling and marketing that product,” said Margaret Coleman, CAB assistant director of education.… Continue reading

Read More »

White House clears way for BSE rule

The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) cleared the way for a comprehensive rule for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), which has been a work in progress since 2004.

The proposed rule would reportedly level the playing field for U.S. beef in the global marketplace by appropriately addressing risk related to BSE. According to National

Cattlemen’s Beef Association Associate Director of Legislative Affairs Kent Bacus, the lack of a comprehensive rule has harmed U.S. beef trade. He said having a comprehensive BSE rule in place will show the United States is willing to talk the talk and walk the walk with regard to following standards developed by the International Organization for Animal Health (OIE).

“It is very difficult for the United States to demand our trading partners follow OIE standards when we are not here at home. The comprehensive BSE rule will change that and will solidify the United States’ commitment to basing our trade relationships on internationally-recognized, sciencebased standards,” Bacus said.… Continue reading

Read More »

Workshop to address legal risks for livestock and dairy producers

Livestock and dairy producers can learn more about legal risks and what they can do to reduce them in a workshop hosted by Ohio State University Extension and the National Agricultural Law Center.

“Livestock farmers today face increasing legal risks,” said Peggy Hall, OSU Extension’s agricultural attorney. “Our goal is to focus on some of the new and most pressing legal risk areas to help our producers minimize potential liability.”

The workshop will be offered 6:30-9:30 p.m. on two dates in two locations:

* March 13 at Ohio State University’s Endeavor Center, 1862 Shyville Road, Piketon.

* March 20 at OSU Extension’s Morrow County office, 871 W. Marion Road, Mt. Gilead.

Speakers for the workshop are Hall and Elizabeth Rumley, attorney with the National Agricultural Law Center. The two attorneys have collaborated on a workshop handbook and presentation that will include such topics as animal cruelty law; Ohio Livestock Care Standards; farm security laws and issues; animal identification requirements; and Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration regulations.… Continue reading

Read More »

Tough phosphorus problem has no easy solutions

By Matt Reese

At the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference in Ada this week, attendees were bombarded with photos charts and graphs illustrating the water quality problems in Ohio. A glass full of green ooze scooped out of Lake Erie, an algae

filled spray behind a jet ski, countless charts showing a steady drop then a sharp rise in phosphorus levels in Ohio’s waterways – there is no shortage of evidence that there is a problem. There is, however, a shortage of viable an across-the-board solutions to the problem.

“We know what the issue is, but we don’t know how to solve it. We need research on this. Environmental groups are just saying, ‘Well, stop using phosphorus.’ We know we can’t do that,” said Glen Arnold, with Ohio State University Extension. “We had the worst algal bloom in 40 years in Lake Erie that provides 5 million people with drinking water it and contributes $10 billion to the economy.”

The numbers though, have many scratching their heads.… Continue reading

Read More »

4Rs: A simple concept and challenging reality

By Matt Reese

With regard to managing phosphorus, the 4Rs are easy to talk about, but it is much harder to actually implement the right source, at the right rate, in the right place at the right time.

“No matter what you do, there are times where there will be run-off and enough water to lose dissolved phosphorus,” said Tom Bruulsema, with the International Plant Nutrition Institute. “Even with great practices like waterways and buffer strips, if water is flowing right through, the dissolved phosphorus is moving right along with the water. The 4Rs are very simple to say and a lot harder to do. What is ‘right?’ The 4Rs take place in the context of the cropping system.”

Right source

“Science has shown that all plants require 17 essential nutrients and we need to apply plant available forms in the amounts needed. We need to credit nutrients from composts and manure for phosphorus and choose a source that you can get placed in the soil rather than on top of the soil,” Bruulsema said.… Continue reading

Read More »

Carefully consider the alternatives for improving damaged pastures

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Rory Lewandowski, OSU Extension Educator, Wayne County and Stan Smith, OSU Extension PA, Fairfield County


Starting with a late summer drought in 2010 that led to overgrazing of some pastures, and then proceeding to the wettest year in recorded Ohio history in 2011, many forage fields have suffered from excessive traffic, trampling and reduced and damaged stands. As we head towards a spring full of renewed promise, one key decision many are facing regards whether or not to reseed the pasture or hay fields that have suffered from Mother Nature’s abuse in recent years.

Like every other input cost, the price of grass and legume seed has increased. What are the options to get these abused pasture paddocks back into a productive forage? Let’s look at several options and management strategies you might consider.

One low cost option, at least in terms of out-of-pocket expenses, is to do nothing.Continue reading

Read More »

Nutrient management important for future of ag

By Matt Reese

The monumental problem of phosphorus fed algal blooms in Lake Erie creates conflict between two powerful forces: food and agriculture versus drinking water

for 5 million people and a $10 billion recreation industry. Ohio agriculture continues to sit and wait (maybe somewhat nervously) on the inevitable announcement from Governor John Kasich concerning the 35-page summary resulting from the Phosphorus Task Force investigation into the recent surge of harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie.

“The Phosphorus Task Force started back in August. The Governor wanted a panel on this issue and there were 125 different groups represented,” said Karl Gebhardt, chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Soil and Water Resources at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference (CTTC) in Ada. “The report has been submitted to the Governor and we feel pretty certain that he will be accepting most of the components of that plan.… Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio pork producers elected as national leaders

Ohio’s pork industry was well represented at the National Pork Industry Forum in Denver, CO, March 1-3. Two Ohio pork producers were nominated to serve as

leaders on the board of directors for the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council.

Pork Act Delegates, meeting at the National Pork Industry Forum, ranked eight candidates for the National Pork Board and submitted the list to the U.S. secretary of agriculture. Among the list of candidates is Carl Link of Fort Recovery. Link represents the Ohio Pork Producers Council through his participation in the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Livestock Environmental Permitting Program.

Additionally, Randy Brown of Nevada, OH was recognized for his service to the National Pork Board. Brown served six years on the National Pork Board, where he was active on many committees including serving as chairman of the Environmental Steward sub-committee.

At the National Pork Producers Council’s annual business meeting, also held at the National Pork Industry Forum, elections were held for new officers and members to the board of directors.  … Continue reading

Read More »

Crop insurance deadline approaching

Farmers have until March 15 to purchase or modify crop insurance policies for 2012. The deadline applies to most spring-planted field crops, including corn and soybeans.  The projected prices established for crop insurance are:

• Corn is $5.68 / bushel

• Soybeans are $12.55 / bushel


Higher prices and higher premiums means policies must be accurate

“This year’s crop prices have provided record-high guarantees for farmers, but with the higher prices, comes higher premiums,” said Tom Sloma, assistant vice president – crop insurance for Farm Credit Services of Mid-America.

Sloma encourages farmers to review their coverage options with their crop insurance agents to make sure their 2012 policy needs are meet.

“It’s equally important for farmers to make sure their policies will cover their needs in the event of a production or revenue loss,” he said.

Sloma said that crop insurance specialists are reviewing customers’ coverage plans and working with them to verify the accuracy of their policies, including items that are sometimes easily overlooked, such as entity type, social security number, tax ID and marital status.… Continue reading

Read More »

Pork Checkoff Honors 2011 Pork Industry Environmental Stewards

The National Pork Board today honored four farm families as recipients of the 2011 Pork Industry Environmental Stewards Award at the annual National Pork Industry Forum being held here. The award, now in its 18th year, recognizes producers who demonstrate a firm commitment to safeguarding the environment and their local communities.

The 2011 award recipients are:

Golden Circle Pork – Woodward, Iowa — Rod and Missy Bice produce 6,600 wean-to-finish pigs annually on their farm set amid 1,400 acres of corn and soybeans. They and their children continue the farming tradition that began more than a century ago by both sides of the family. The Bices were also named Environmental Stewards for Iowa in 2010.

John M. Langdon Farms – Benson, N.C. — John and Eileen Langdon produce 20,000 finishing pigs per year on their 205-acre farm. They, together with their three grown children, also maintain 65 brood cows on the same farm that’s been in the family for 70-plus years.… Continue reading

Read More »

Beef breeding programs help producers capitalize on prices

Artificial insemination breeding programs can help cattle producers capitalize on prices that are at an unprecedented high, a Purdue Extension beef specialist says.

While many cow-calf producers shy away from artificial insemination because of the extensive management requirements, Ron Lemenager said incorporating an estrous synchronization program into the breeding plan can reduce time spent detecting estrous and increase the number of cows bred in the first week of the breeding season.

“Cow numbers are the lowest since 1952. This puts the cow-calf producers in the driver’s seat if they play their cards right,” he said. “A bred cow is worth about twice as much as an open cow, so it’s important to get these cows bred as early as possible.”

Getting cows bred the first week of the breeding season helps ensure that calves are older and heavier at weaning. It also means more uniform calves.

Lemenager recommended that producers consider an estrous synchronization program such as the 5 Day CO-Synch + CIDR.… Continue reading

Read More »