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OCA members to offer nearly 115 consignments in Replacement Female Sale

Several members of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) will sell nearly 115 consignments in the OCA Replacement Female Sale on Friday, Nov. 23, 2018, at 6 p.m. at the Muskingum Livestock Auction Company facility in Zanesville, Ohio. Consignments include approximately 40 mature cows less than five years of age and cow/calf pairs and approximately 75 bred heifers.

Breeds represented will include Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Red Angus, Simmental, Simmental influenced and cross and commercial females. Service sire breeds represented include Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Maine-Anjou, Red Angus, Shorthorn, Simmental, and Simmental influenced. All females selling will have a safe pregnancy status verified within sixty days of the sale and all lots will be eligible for interstate shipment.

“Now is a great opportunity for cattlemen to add numbers to their herd or get started in the beef business,” said John Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator. “This sale represents an excellent opportunity for cow-calf producers to add quality bred heifers and young cows to their herds.”

To view the consignments, visit the OCA YouTube page in mid-November to view the 2018 Replacement Female Sale playlist.

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California voters approve Prop 12

On Election Day California voters approved Proposition 12, an initiative that, starting in 2020, bans the sale of pork and veal from animals raised anywhere in the country in housing the state banned through a 2008 ballot initiative. (In 2010, the California Legislature banned the sale of eggs from hens housed in so-called battery cages regardless of where they are raised.)

Prop. 12 also requires egg-laying hens in the state to be cage free. National Pork Producers Council, which strongly opposed it, maintains that the initiative violates the U.S. Constitution’s Commerce Clause and that it will be costly for farmers and consumers. The organization is supporting federal legislation that would prohibit states from regulating agricultural production practices outside their borders and is backing lawsuits — now pending before the U.S. Supreme Court — filed by attorneys general from nearly two dozen states against California’s egg sales ban and a 2016 Massachusetts ballot measure that banned the sale of eggs, pork and veal from animals raised in housing prohibited by the same measure.

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FAD transmission risk is greater with garbage feeding

Despite many advancements in the U.S. pork industry’s focus on disease risk mitigation, 28 states (along with Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) still allow some type of garbage feeding to swine. While deemed acceptable by the USDA’s Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service (APHIS) when strict protocols are followed, the potential risk of foreign animal disease (FAD) transmission remains with this practice.

According to Dave Pyburn, senior vice president of science and technology for the Pork Checkoff, the practice of garbage feeding to pigs in the United States is somewhat of a holdover from the past.

“We used to feed many more hogs this way than we do now,” he said. “But the important thing is that if a producer does decide to do this type of feeding where it’s allowed, he or she must do so by strictly adhering to the APHIS guidelines.”

The Swine Health Protection Act (SHPA) regulates food waste containing any meat products fed to swine.

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Livestock building rental considerations

By Rory Lewandowski, Extension Educator Wayne County

Recently I have gotten some questions about rental of livestock buildings, specifically dairy facilities. Typically, callers want to know a charge per square foot or a rental rate based on a per head basis or, for a dairy facility, based on number of free stalls. The reality is that there is no one right or correct answer.

Several methods or approaches generate a dollar figure for rental. However, view that number as a starting point in a rental negotiation. There are additional factors that affect the final rental rate. Those factors include the age and condition of the building, location of the building, the functionality or obsolescence of the building, the demand for rental of this type of building and the character and personality of the parties involved in the rental agreement.

The simplest and most direct way of calculating a building rental rate is to use a commercial rate, a known market.

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Sheep industry diversity to highlight 2018 Buckeye Shepherd’s Symposium program

By Roger A. High, OSIA/OSWP Executive Director

The 2018 Buckeye Shepherd’s Symposium (BSS) will once again concentrate on a diversity of topics related to the success of the sheep operation both now and in the future.

This event is Nov. 30 through Dec. 1 at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), Shisler Conference Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691.

This year’s two-day program topics include: improving profitability through grazing and forage production principles, sheep nutrition including topics on vitamins and minerals, artificial rearing of lambs, early weaning and technology tips, expanding on OSU/OARDC sheep research, nutrient and manure management, and wool marketing. The popular Friday program Shepherd’s College will concentrate on several facets of production to help sheep farmers improve their profitability, including Management intensive grazing 101, using graziers tools, and producer study groups.

The featured speaker is Woody Lane, a nationally-known livestock nutritionist from Roseburg, Oregon. Lane owns and operates an independent consulting firm “Lane Livestock Services,” teaches courses in forages and livestock nutrition to ranchers in the area, facilitates three forage discussion groups for farmers, and writes the popular monthly column “From the Feed Trough…” for The Shepherd magazine.

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U.S. beef exports remain solid while pork exports still face challenges

U.S. beef exports remained very strong in September while pork exports continued to be impacted by retaliatory duties in China and Mexico, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Beef exports cooled from the record results posted in August, but were still significantly higher year-over-year. Pork muscle cut exports improved over last September’s volume, but were offset by sharply lower shipments of pork variety meat.

September beef exports totaled 110,160 metric tons (mt), up 6% from a year ago, valued at $687.1 million — up 11%. For January through September, beef exports were just over 1 million mt, up 9% from a year ago, while value surged 18% to $6.2 billion. For beef muscle cuts only, the year-over-year increases were even more impressive, jumping 13% in volume (777,740 mt) and 20% in value ($5.54 billion).

Exports accounted for 13.7% of total beef production in September and 11.4% for muscle cuts only, up from 12.5% and 10.4%, respectively, a year ago.

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Gag order lifted in North Carolina nuisance lawsuit

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth District in late October struck down a gag order related to North Carolina hog farm nuisance lawsuits brought against Murphy-Brown, the hog production subsidiary of Smithfield Foods. The court said the gag order, which prohibited lawyers or anyone with knowledge of conditions of North Carolina hog operations from sharing information, violated the First Amendment.

Judge Earl Britt, of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina, in late June imposed the gag order on the parties, lawyers and potential witnesses in the lawsuits. Britt said a “significant increase in trial publicity” and the “volume and scope of prejudicial publicity” about the first two cases — one decided in early May and the other two days after the gag order was implemented — could taint future jurors. (More than a dozen nuisance suits were filed.) The National Pork Producers Council and the North Carolina Pork Council (NCPC) in August filed a friend-of-the-court brief in support of lifting the gag order.

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Certified Angus Beef celebrates 40 years with 40 barn paintings, keeping Ohio at its heart

By Joel Penhorwood

The Ohio-based Certified Angus Beef brand known around the world has spent the past year celebrating 40 years of existence by painting their famous logo on 40 barns across the country.

“We feel extremely fortunate to be able to celebrate 40 years. That’s a real milestone for this brand and production agriculture as well, and definitely the Angus breed,” said John Stika, president of Certified Angus Beef. “It means 40 years of providing consumers with the high quality product, both here in Ohio as well as around the world. And we’re here today on the exact date 40 years later that the brand sold its first pound as Renzetti’s IGA in Columbus, Ohio.”

Stika made the comments after he put the finishing touches on the final mural of the 40-barn campaign in which artist Troy Freeman crisscrossed the country to paint a diverse range of buildings from brand new metal structures to old wooden barns.

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Ohio’s dairy industry creates $23.44 billion economic impact

Ohio’s dairy farmers do more than just produce milk — they create jobs, contribute to their communities and help drive Ohio’s economy. The total economic impact of dairy products produced and sold in Ohio is $23.44 billion.

Food and agriculture is the number one contributor to Ohio’s economy, and farming provides one out of every eight jobs in Ohio, according to the Ohio Livestock Coalition.

In Ohio, dairy farming families milk more than 261,000 dairy cows on about 2,200 dairy farms. As milk makes its journey from farm to table, it employs farm workers, trucker drivers, construction workers, factory workers, retailers and more.

Ohio’s dairy industry provides 114,053 jobs for Ohioans, based on a 2018 report by the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA). Nationally, said IDFA research, the dairy industry creates nearly 3 million U.S. jobs and has an overall economic impact of more than $628 billion.

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EPA rule exempts farms from emissions reporting

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed a rule exempting livestock farmers from reporting to state and local authorities the routine emissions from their farms.

“The rule announced today is the final piece in the implementation of the FARM Act, which passed Congress earlier this year and which eliminated the need for livestock farmers to estimate and report to the federal government emissions from the natural breakdown of manure,” said Jim Heimerl, president of the National Pork Producers Council, a pork producer from Johnstown, Ohio. “That bipartisan measure was approved because it was unnecessary and impractical for farmers to waste their time and resources alerting government agencies that there are livestock on farms.”

The Fair Agricultural Reporting Method, or FARM, Act fixed a problem created last April when a U.S. Court of Appeals rejected a 2008 EPA rule that exempted farmers from reporting routine farm emissions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA).

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Dairy aid helps, but not enough

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) needs to better reflect the dairy-farm incomes lost to tariff retaliation when it calculates its next round of trade mitigation payments, the said today.

In a letter sent Tuesday to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, National Milk Producers Federation Chairman and dairy farmer Randy Mooney cited four studies illustrating that milk producers have experienced more than $1 billion in lost income since May, when the retaliatory tariffs were first placed on dairy goods in response to U.S. levies on foreign products. In contrast, the first round of USDA trade mitigation payments, announced in August, allocated only $127 million to dairy farmers.

“We are ever-grateful for your advocacy on agricultural trade, which is crucial to the economic health of our industry,” wrote Mooney, who operates Mooney Dairy in Rogersville, Missouri, with his wife, Jan. “However, our members are greatly concerned about the level of aid that was provided in the initial effort.”

The letter details four analyses, including two independent studies using sophisticated economic modeling, that each show losses to dairy producers far above USDA’s initial payment level.

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Key facts about African swine fever

Despite the Chinese government’s control efforts, the spread of African swine fever (ASF) continues in China. The official reports from the World Health Organization (OIE) now say there have been more than 40 cases confirmed in 11 provinces, including one in the far south of the country. Despite this geographic advance, some pig movement has been allowed to help with China’s domestic demand for pork.

And, according to a recent Global Disease Monitoring Report by the Swine Health Information Center, Brazil has reported a case of classical swine fever (CSF) in their country. The Brazilian case, which was reported earlier this month, was in the country’s far north, which is not in a major pig-producing area. This part of Brazil was already not considered to be free of CSF.

U.S. pork is not affected by the ASF outbreaks in other countries and is safe to eat.

  • ASF does not affect humans and therefore is not a public health threat.
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Ag applauds work to deepen Philippine trade relations

The U.S. Trade Representative announced progress in talks with the Philippines under the bilateral Trade and Investment Framework Agreement (TIFA). U.S. dairy producers and processors appreciate the Administration’s work to preserve and deepen market access ties with a country that purchased $243 million in U.S. dairy products last year.

In a joint statement released about the recent achievements in resolving trade issues under the TIFA, both governments agreed that they should work together to benefit agriculture. This is viewed as a promising development given Southeast Asia’s growing market for dairy products.

U.S. officials noted that the Philippines has been handling geographical indications (GIs) in a fair manner that preserves the use of common names and welcomed their commitment to “discuss ways to ensure that Philippine laws, regulations, and policies do not restrict or prohibit entry of U.S. products in the Philippine market.”

To further that goal, the Philippines confirmed that “it will not provide automatic GI protection, including to terms exchanged as part of a trade agreement.” Tom Vilsack, president and CEO of the U.S.

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USDA temporarily halts pork imports from Poland

The U.S. Department of Agriculture to temporarily stopped shipments to the United States of pork from Poland.

The USDA has suspended entry of imports of fresh and frozen pork and pork products from Poland while it completes a review of that country’s export protocols. According to the USDA, “As part of a routine review of ongoing operations, it came to our attention that one Polish facility exporting pork to the U.S. has done so in contravention of the stringent requirements in place to prevent the spread of serious diseases of livestock, like ASF.”

USDA’s action was taken out of an abundance of caution to ensure that the United States remains free of African Swine Fever (ASF), a highly contagious, trade-limiting pig disease with no cure. USDA has been closely monitoring ASF’s spread in Eastern Europe — parts of Poland have the disease — and in Asia. The disease underscores the need for the United States to be better prepared to address foreign animal diseases, including by establishing a more robust vaccine bank to deal with an outbreak of Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD), another trade-limiting disease endemic in many parts of the world.

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Trade news offers some optimism for pork producers

News on the trade front is getting better for U.S. pork producers as the Trump administration announced it wants to negotiate trade agreements with the European Union, Japan and the United Kingdom. The National Pork Producers Council commended the administration for its ambitious trade agenda.

The administration recently updated agreements with Canada and Mexico and with South Korea that maintained the U.S. pork industry’s zero-tariff access to those important markets, three of the top five destinations for U.S. pork exports.

“We’ve got the momentum on trade headed in the right direction now,” said NPPC President Jim Heimerl, a pork producer from Johnstown, Ohio. “Producers are hurting because of retaliatory tariffs on pork, which were prompted by the administration’s efforts to realign U.S. trade policy. But producers have been patient, and now that patience is starting to pay off, particularly if we get a trade deal with Japan.”

Since Trump took office in January 2017, NPPC has been urging the White House to begin trade talks with countries in the fast-growing Asia-Pacific region, beginning with Japan, the U.S.

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Lepley Farms finds balance in growing herd and compliance with new barn

By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag Net

For a few years now, Dave Lepley has been contemplating expanding his Huron County cattle herd. He knew he wanted to grow the number of head on his farm, but if he was going to take a big step in that direction, he wanted to do it the right way.

“We had a bed-pack dry lot with about 300 head and as we did research for expansion we came across the idea for this new cattle barn,” Lepley said. “We wanted to comply with a lot of different things. We had to have cattle comfort, we had to have compliance with EPA rules because of our proximity to Lake Erie so we wanted to be sure that as we built our herd size we could house them all in one facility.”

The result is a 101-foot by 321-foot by16-foot indoor feedlot facility in Bellevue permitted to hold 1,000 head of cattle.

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Beef Industry Update Meeting to be held in Williams County

A Beef Industry Update meeting hosted by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) will take place in Williams County. Beef producers from Williams and surrounding counties are encouraged to attend. The meeting will be held Tuesday, Oct. 30 at 6:30 p.m. at the Williams County Fairgrounds — 619 E. Main Street, Montpelier, OH 43543.

At the meeting, OCA staff will discuss OCA events and policy updates. A complimentary dinner will be sponsored by OCA Allied Industry Council (AIC) members Farm Credit Mid-America and Kalmbach Feeds, Inc. and door prizes will be provided. Attendees will have the opportunity to hear from Farm Credit Mid-America and Kalmbach Feeds, Inc. representatives on keeping their cattle in production and profitable.

The 2018 Beef Industry Update producer education partner is the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and National Corn Growers Association.

Contact the OCA office at 614-873-6736 or email cattle@ohiocattle.org for more information about the beef industry update meetings.

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Livestock groups petition Department of Transportation for Hours of Service flexibility

Organizations representing livestock, bee, and fish haulers across the country recently submitted a petition to the Department of Transportation (DOT) requesting additional flexibility on Hours of Service (HOS) requirements. The petition asks for a five-year exemption from certain HOS requirements for livestock haulers and encourages DOT to work with the livestock industry to implement additional fatigue-management practices.

Current rules limit drive time to 11 hours and limit on-duty hours to 14. Instead, the organizations request that livestock haulers be granted approval to drive up to 15 hours with a 16-hour on-duty period, following a 10-hour consecutive rest period. Any livestock hauler wishing to operate under the extended drive time would be required to complete pre-trip planning and increased fatigue-management training.

“We are concerned that the 11- and 14-hour rules were not drafted with livestock haulers in mind and thus do not accommodate the unique character of their loads and nature of their trips,” the organizations wrote.

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It’s time to grow forage, take inventory, and use it efficiently

By Victor Shelton, NRCS state agronomist/grazing specialist

Fall is here and it means that our perennial forages are starting to think about taking a siesta. You will want to do three things this time of year: grow as much forage as you can prior to plants going dormant, be as efficient as you can with what you have to graze, and take inventory on how much winter feed you have on hand.

There are still plenty of good growing days left this fall and they need to be taken advantage of. One of the first things to do to make sure you obtain as much growth as possible, especially with perennial forages, is to stop grazing forages that can and will continue to grow for a while, especially forages that will stockpile like tall fescue.

Tall fescue stockpiles better than almost any other forage in the midwest. I would rather that not be old Kentucky 31 endophyte-infected fescue, but even KY 31 makes some really good feed in the winter time, especially after going through a few hard freezes.

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Livestock diseases a global threat worth monitoring

By Don “Doc” Sanders

This month’s column is more serious than most. If you’re looking for entertainment and my usual wild stories, you may want to skip this one. But this column is a must-read, if you raise livestock and/or care about the American food supply (and if you’re like me, you like to eat). Livestock disease outbreaks are occurring every day somewhere in the world. These diseases, if not contained, could threaten our food supply and lifestyle in a way that most Americans are too naïve to fathom.

It will pay you to be aware of this situation, so you can be prepared. For starters, here are a few facts that escape most Americans.

  • Many diseases are zoonotic. This means they can spread from animals to humans, or vice versa.
  • An example is avian influenza, which can pass from birds to humans. Remember the avian flu outbreak a couple years ago?
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