Home / Livestock (page 22)

Livestock



Ohio State University Livestock Judging Camp June 5-7

In early June, 4-H and FFA members from around the state will be learning from some of the top livestock experts in the state at The Ohio State University Livestock Judging Camp.

The three-day camp is designed to help young livestock exhibitors enhance their skills in judging and oral communication. The cost for the camp from June 5 to June 7 is $250 and includes all meals, lodging and an OSU souvenir. Forms to apply can be found on the OSU Livestock Judging Team Facebook page. The deadline to apply is May 15. For more information contact Hank LeVan at LeVan.27@osu.edu.

 

Itinerary

Monday

10:30 AM-11:30 AM Registration & Room assignment at Torres House on North Campus

11:30 AM-12:00 PM Travel to Animal Science Building

12:00 PM-12:45 PM Introduction to Camp, rules, expectations, Lunch

12:45 PM-2:00 PM Split into Groups, Team building exercise

2:00 PM-5:00 PM Intro to Livestock Evaluation, Note taking, Reasons

5:00 PM- 6:00 PM Dinner

6:00 PM- 8:00 PM Camp Activity

8:00 PM – 8:30 PM Return to Dorms

10:00 PM Lights out

Tuesday

7:15 AM – 8:00 AM Breakfast at Dorms

8:00 AM -8:30 AM Travel to Animal Science Building

8:30 AM- 9:30 AM Guest Speaker

9:30 AM- 12:00 PM Cattle Evaluation & Reasons

12:00 PM- 12:30 PM Lunch

12:30 PM-2:30 PM Swine Evaluation & Reasons

2:30 PM-4:30 PM Sheep & Goat Evaluation & Reasons

4:30 PM- 5:00 PM Team Building Exercise

5:00 PM- 6:00 PM Dinner

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM Camp Activity

8:00 PM – 8:30 PM Return to Dorms

10:00 PM Lights out

Wednesday

7:15 AM – 8:00 AM Breakfast at Dorms

8:00 AM -8:30 AM Travel to Animal Science Building

8:30 AM- 9:30 AM Reasons

10:00 AM – 1:00 PM Judging Contest with Reasons

1:00 PM- 2:00 PM Lunch, Critique and Recap of Contest

2:00 PM -3:30 PM Awards Banquet

3:30 PM Closing remarks, Camp Dismissed

Continue reading

Read More »

National Dairy FARM Program releases stockmanship training video with BQA

The National Dairy FARM Program announced today the release of a stockmanship training video as part of the program’s partnership with the National Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program.

The 27-minute video is divided into several chapters, including “Point of Balance,” “Understanding the Flight Zone” and “Utilizing Tools to Effectively Move Cattle.” Each segment contains reminder points and multiple choice questions to test viewers on the content. The video can serve as a training resource to satisfy the FARM Animal Care Version 3.0 requirement for annual employee training.

The video, directed by Dr. Robert Hagevoort of New Mexico State and the U.S. Dairy Education & Training Consortium, is available on theFARM Program website and YouTube page in both English and Spanish.

“We are more than happy to develop and provide a tool for farmers and employees that will help them better understand why cows behave the way they do, and as a result become more careful and more efficient animal caretakers,” Hagevoort said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Wayne County dairy manure storage inventory survey

In early January 2017, the Wayne County Extension office in partnership with the Wayne County Farm Bureau, Wayne County SWCD and NRCS, the Wayne County Ag Success Team and the Wayne-Ashland Dairy Service Unit, mailed a survey to 339 Wayne County dairy farms to determine the current manure storage capacity on those farms. Addresses of dairy farms were provided by the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and included both Grade A and Grade B milk producers. The purpose of the survey was to gather base-line information to assess how prepared Wayne County dairy farms are to comply with Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) type of clean water/nutrient management legislation. Surveys were returned in early February of 2017 and Ohio University Environmental Studies graduate student Janessa Hill tabulated survey responses and prepared summaries of the results.

SB 1 legislation became effective on July 3, 2015 and currently covers the Western Lake Erie Basin and contains specific provisions regarding manure application and prohibitions against application of manure (and granular fertilizer) during winter months and when soils are saturated.

Continue reading

Read More »

Effective management of the breeding season

For spring-calving beef herds, the breeding season is likely underway. Many decisions have already been made in terms of the genetic makeup of the 2018 calf crop. Natural herd sires or sires to be used through artificial insemination have been selected. Mature cows have been retained and replacement heifers have been introduced to the breeding herd. Hopefully the genetic decisions that have been made will prove profitable when next year’s calf crop is sold.

Nearly every beef specialist or researcher that I am familiar with will tell the cow-calf producer that reproduction is the most economically important trait in beef cattle. Numerous studies have shown that reproduction is several times more important than growth or carcass traits. Simply put, genetic superiority in any trait doesn’t matter if the beef female doesn’t get bred and deliver a live calf for the producer.

How can the cattleman evaluate the reproductive performance of the herd?

Continue reading

Read More »

Canada responds to dairy trade criticism

U.S. dairy sector and state agriculture officials urged President Trump to take immediate action against Canada’s perceived disregard for its trade obligations under the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Most recently, Canada implemented a new national pricing policy that dairy groups contend blocks American dairy exports and will enable significant dumping of Canadian dairy products onto the world market. As a result, dozens of dairy farmers in the Midwest recently learned they must find new customers for their milk by May 1, which will cause considerable economic hardship and possibly force them to go out of business.

In a joint letter sent to President Trump, the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) and the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) urged the administration to tell Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to halt the new pricing policy and restore imports of the blocked U.S.

Continue reading

Read More »

OSIA/OSWP award nominations due June 1, 2017

In 2010, the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) Board of Trustees initiated an award nomination program to recognize outstanding accomplishments made by sheep farmers as well as people who are associated with the Ohio sheep industry. Nominations for these awards can only be submitted by OSIA members and must be received by June 1, 2017.

Award recipients will be honored at the 2017 Buckeye Shepherd’s Symposium. If you would like to nominate someone for any of these awards, please contact the OSIA Office at 614-246-8299 or rhigh@ofbf.org for an application. Award applications are posted at www.ohiosheep.org.

Nominations are being accepted for the following categories. Information and requirements regarding these awards will be available with the award application:

  • Charles Boyles Master Shepherd Award
  • Friend of the Ohio Sheep Industry Award
  • Distinguished Service Award
  • Environmental Stewardship Award
Continue reading

Read More »

In search of the 2017-18 Ohio Lamb and Wool Queen

The search is on once again. Help us round up the next Ohio Lamb and Wool Queen. The queen serves as a spokesperson for the industry throughout her year of reign at numerous promotional events and activities around the state and will be selected by judges at the Ohio State Fair.

Contestants will attend an interview and answer an impromptu question from a panel of judges live at the conclusion of the Guys and Gals lead competition. The selection of the queen is based on personality, presentation, poise and knowledge of the Ohio Lamb and Wool industry.

Contestants are encouraged to participate in the Guys and Gals Lead competition and we encourage all ladies between the ages of 17-22 who are involved in the industry to consider applying for this position. This is a tremendous opportunity to build a wealth of knowledge of the Ohio sheep, lamb and wool industry, expand communication skills, and network within Ohio agriculture.

Continue reading

Read More »

Some cows may be predisposed to subacute ruminal acidosis

Scientists are not sure why some cows develop the condition known as subacute ruminal acidosis, or SARA, but producers know it causes a number of minor symptoms that add up to major problems over time.

“Subacute ruminal acidosis is what happens when the pH of the rumen — the large compartment of a cow’s stomach — gets too low. It’s not severe, but it’s lower than ideal. It’s difficult to detect. Because of that, we don’t have a great understanding of how it happens and what are the contributing factors,” said assistant professor of animal sciences Josh McCann.

Left untreated, cows can develop inflammation, laminitis (a hoof issue related to lameness), or liver abscesses. Constantly fighting low-level ailments leaves cows with fewer resources to invest in milk or meat production, and McCann says that leads to higher culling rates in dairies.

To get a handle on what is happening in the rumen during SARA, McCann and his collaborators tried to induce the condition in dairy cows by simulating the behavior of rapid feeders — the cows that are most often affected by SARA.

Continue reading

Read More »

NPPC pushing for GIPSA withdraw

Starting this week after former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue is confirmed as Secretary of Agriculture, the National Pork Producers Council will begin a concerted effort to get the Trump administration to withdraw the Obama-era Farmer Fair Practices Rules related to the buying and selling of livestock. Written by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA), it includes two proposed regulations and an interim final rule, the latter of which now is set to become effective Oct. 19. A new proposed GIPSA rule will determine what USDA should do with the interim final rule; it has a 60-day period — from April 12 to June 12 — for the public to submit comments on whether the agency should: allow the interim final rule to become effective, suspend it indefinitely, delay its effective date or withdraw the regulation.

The interim final rule would broaden the scope of the Packers and Stockyards Act (PSA) of 1921 related to using “unfair, unjustly discriminatory or deceptive practices” and to giving “undue or unreasonable preferences or advantages.” Specifically, the regulation would deem such actions per se violations of federal law even if they didn’t harm competition or cause competitive injury, prerequisites for winning PSA cases.

Continue reading

Read More »

Culinary Center building beef demand through education

What once was an Italian restaurant, serving chicken parmesan and lasagna on the outskirts of Wooster, Ohio, now only has one thing on the menu — beef.

The hostess station and the full bar is all that remains from the once garlic-filled establishment, but what Certified Angus Beef has added to the facility, now known as The Culinary Center, is something that will continue to bolster demand for beef products.

“We realized about five years ago that there was a huge need out there with the partners we work with from the grocery business, food service, chefs and everyone in between,” said Mark McCully, Vice President of Production with Certified Angus Beef. “They had a lot of questions about meat production and agriculture so we made the decision to create a venue to bring those folks in and teach them about where the cuts come from, beef fabrication and merchandising, beef quality and the job farmers and ranchers do to supply high-quality meat.”

20170418_133128 (800x450)The Culinary Center consists of a world-class culinary team that is very passionate about beef quality and the Certified Angus Beef brand.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio Poultry Association banquet highlights

As always the Ohio Poultry Association Annual Celebration Banquet was an event not to be missed, this year featuring a “Peace, Love & Poultry” theme.

The 32nd annual banquet featured great food and the chance to recognize award winners. Jim Cooper, of Cooper Farms was recognized with the Golden Egg Award. Others recognized at the event included the Stoller family from Van Wert County that received the Family Legacy Award, veterinarian Tim Barman, Ohio Representative Dave Hall and Ohio Representative Brian Hill.

One of the key issues facing Ohio’s egg producers are the shifting whims of consumer demand. Many of the companies who buy Ohio eggs are planning to require cage-free production in the near future.

“There is a lot of uncertainty, but the discussion continues on the announcements coming forward that a lot of the companies that we are supplying are going to transition to cage-free products somewhere

between 2018 and 2025,” said Lisa Timmerman, with Cooper Farms, who serves as president of the Ohio Poultry Association.

Continue reading

Read More »

Scrapie submissions needed

The good news for American sheep producers is that the industry has scrapie on the run. The bad news is that the current status makes carriers of the fatal disease more difficult to find.

“The incidence rate is now very low and finding the few remaining cases becomes more difficult using traditional surveillance methods,” said Wyoming State Veterinarian Jim Logan, DVM. “The best and most appropriate method now is within flock surveillance. It is in the best interest of the industry that we sample as many adult dead sheep and goats that we can find and get them tested.”

The only diagnostic tests currently available to determine if a sheep has scrapie require brain or lymphoid tissue. Scrapie is typically diagnosed by finding abnormal prion protein accumulation in the brain and/or lymphoid tissue of infected sheep. A positive test must be confirmed by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories. While no new cases of classical scrapie have been reported in the United States since April 2016, there’s still a need to be vigilant.

Continue reading

Read More »

Now is not the time to relax for cattle producers

April is an exciting time of the year for cow-calf producers. The 2017 calf crop is taking shape and breeding season is currently or soon will be underway  We have begun to emerge from the doldrums of winter to the warmth and new growth of spring. The drudgery of feeding hay to the herd is coming to an end as pastures begin their early spring flush of growth. It is certainly a great feeling to see cow-calf pairs turned out to fresh pastures for the first grazing of the season.

Nutrition

However, this is not necessarily a time for the cow-calf to relax and take for granted that the nutritional needs of the breeding herd are being met. In fact, this may be the most critical time of the year for producers to focus on the needs of the herd. This is especially true for yearling heifers and two-year-olds nursing their first calves.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio sheep industry scholarships

Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) is once again sponsoring the Dr. Jack Judy and Ralph H. Grimshaw Memorial Scholarships to support future sheep farmers through its scholarship program. OSIA is offering a minimum of one $1,500 scholarship and a $1,000 scholarship to deserving students, which have graduated from high school, and college students pursuing college degrees. Preference will be given to students pursuing a degree in Agriculture.

“The Ohio sheep industry depends on young people who are considering and pursuing a career that will be beneficial to the Ohio and United States sheep industry,” said Roger A. High, OSIA Executive Director.

Although accurate information is not available prior to the year 2003; since the year 2003 27 Ohio sheep youth have received $18,050 in scholarships from the Ralph H. Grimshaw Memorial Scholarship Fund.  As 2016 was the initial year of the Dr. Jack Judy Memorial Scholarship Fund, one recipient received a scholarship for $1,500.00. 

Continue reading

Read More »

New study offers good news for pork producers

What happens when meat scientists get their hands on nearly 8,000 commercially raised pigs? They spend a year running dozens of tests and crunching numbers to arrive at research-backed management recommendations for pork producers.

“We had an opportunity to answer a lot of questions for the pork industry,” said Dustin Boler, assistant professor in the animal sciences department at the University of Illinois.

The team, which also included U of I graduate students, USDA meat science researchers, and a representative from Smithfield Foods, recently published their findings in five articles.

Anna Dilger, an associate professor in the department, explained their approach.

“The two main questions were, ‘Can I measure quality in one part of the pig and predict quality in the rest of it?’ And then, ‘What is the true variability in pork quality out there and what’s causing it?’” she said.

In the first article, the team looked at correlations between loin quality and quality of the belly and ham from the same pig.

Continue reading

Read More »

Jim Percival elected as chair of the American Lamb Board of Directors

Jim Percival, of Xenia, begins his last appointed term on the American Lamb Board and has been elected the serve as the 2017 ALB Chair. He represents small sheep producers on this national checkoff IMG_7352 (640x433)program.

Percival has been involved in the sheep and lamb industry for many years, serving on both the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association Board of Trustees, including serving as OSIA President, and the Ohio Sheep and Wool Program.

“Jim has taken this national leadership as an opportunity to be make impact in the promotion of lamb across the United States,” said Roger A. High, Ohio Sheep Improvement Association Executive Director.

Continue reading

Read More »

Questioning grazing efficiencies

There are certainly times when it would be much easier to just leave all the gates open and let the livestock manage themselves. Obviously, there must be some merit in this type of management, or lack of, because it is still pretty common. This is especially true in the spring. For those whose primary focus is planting corn and beans, pasture management is usually not a high priority. Equipment, field preparation and planting is the top priority; the cows will be fine until planting is done, until sidedressing is done, until first cutting of hay is done, etc. Unfortunately, by the time most of those producers have completed that work, they are usually short on forages. Hay or other fed feeds now take the place of management or time not expended earlier.

I still often question grazing efficiencies. Certainly not all of the forage that is produced will make it into the animal and likewise, not all of the potential growth is always lost or achieved.

Continue reading

Read More »

New Ohio Forages website launched

Our new Ohio Forages website has been launched, and can be found at https://forages.osu.edu/.  This is the same url as our old Ohio Forage Network site.

We intend for this website to be the go-to place to find all things forage within the Ohio State University Extension system. We are still in the process of adding content but it already includes a fair amount of information and news on forage and pasture management. We will be adding to each section over time. Be sure to check out the Resources tab for some cool photos and links to some of our favorite forage-related websites. A brand new feature we plan to add over the next few months is a place to add and compile videos on key aspects of forage management.

So browse around in it and let me (sulc.2@osu.edu) know if you have any suggestions.

Continue reading

Read More »

Establishing new forage stands

This month provides one of the two preferred times to seed perennial cool-season forages. The other preferred timing for cool-season grasses and legumes is in late summer, primarily the month of August here in Ohio. The relative success of spring vs. summer seeding of forages is greatly affected by the prevailing weather conditions, and so growers have success and failures with each option.

Probably the two primary difficulties with spring plantings are finding a good window of opportunity when soils are dry enough before it gets too late, and managing weed infestations that are usually more difficult with spring plantings. The following steps will help improve your chances for successful forage establishment in the spring.

  1. Make sure soil pH and fertility are in the recommended ranges.  Follow the Tri-state Soil Fertility Recommendations (https://forages.osu.edu/forage-management/soil-fertility-forages) .  Forages are more productive where soil pH is above 6.0, but for alfalfa it should be 6.5 – 6.8.
Continue reading

Read More »

GIPSA rule delayed again

It was recently announced that the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) is delaying the effective date of its interim final rule an additional six months to Oct. 19, 2017.

This was viewed as a positive step in the right direction according to many livestock groups.

“This is another step toward common sense and away from counterproductive government intrusion in the free market,” said Craig Uden, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) president. “That said, while a delay is welcome, ultimately this rule should be killed and American cattle producers should be free to market our beef without the threat of government-sanctioned frivolous lawsuits.”

Two proposed rules and one interim final rule came out on Dec. 20, 2016, one month before the end of the Obama Administration. The interim final rule regarding the scope of the Packers and Stockyards Act and the proposed rule regarding undue preference and unjust treatment have a direct negative impact on the cattle industry.

Continue reading

Read More »