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Ohio Department of Agriculture Awards Money to Farmers Markets

Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Robert Boggs today announces the department awarded $25,346 in grant money to 22 Ohio farmers markets to assist with advertising costs using funds made available through the department’s Farmers Market Cost Share Advertising Program.

Farmers markets in the following counties received grants: Tuscarawas, Stark, Summit, Cuyahoga, Lake, Wood, Darke, Shelby, Miami, Montgomery, Hamilton, Clermont, Franklin and Perry.

“Farmers markets play an important role in bringing fresh, healthy local foods to Ohio communities, as well as creating strong relationships among farmers, local artisans and consumers,” said Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Robert Boggs. “These farmers markets will be able to use the marketing funds to strengthen their presence and to keep the agriculture industry thriving in Ohio.”

All Ohio non-profit farmers markets were eligible to participate in a competitive application and evaluation process to reimburse advertising expenses up to 50 percent, with a maximum of $1,500 available for an individual farmers market.

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Ohio Composting Tour Set for Aug. 5

A central Ohio composting facility that takes in 150,000 cubic yards of yard trimmings and food waste every year, equal to the loads of nearly 40,000 pickup trucks, and makes sellable mulches and soil blends.

A new renewable energy system set to generate 1 million watts of electricity an hour from, among other things, sewage from the city of Columbus.

How to meet Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards for composting facilities, pass an inspection, and protect both your workers and business.

Learn about all that more at Composting in Ohio 2010: A Tour of the Industry, Thursday, Aug. 5, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., in and around Columbus.

Organizers say the program is for composting facility operators, researchers, educators, public-agency personnel, government officials and anyone else with an interest in large-scale composting and compost use.

Registration costs $40 per person, includes lunch and is due by July 30.

Call 330-202-3533 or e-mail wicks.14@osu.edu for details, or download the tour brochure and registration form at http://oardc.osu.edu/ocamm/ (click on the link for the tour under “In the News”).

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Ohio Department of Agriculture Awards Money to Farmers Markets

Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Robert Boggs today announces the department awarded $25,346 in grant money to 22 Ohio farmers markets to assist with advertising costs using funds made available through the department’s Farmers Market Cost Share Advertising Program.

Farmers markets in the following counties received grants: Tuscarawas, Stark, Summit, Cuyahoga, Lake, Wood, Darke, Shelby, Miami, Montgomery, Hamilton, Clermont, Franklin and Perry.

“Farmers markets play an important role in bringing fresh, healthy local foods to Ohio communities, as well as creating strong relationships among farmers, local artisans and consumers,” said Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Robert Boggs. “These farmers markets will be able to use the marketing funds to strengthen their presence and to keep the agriculture industry thriving in Ohio.”

All Ohio non-profit farmers markets were eligible to participate in a competitive application and evaluation process to reimburse advertising expenses up to 50 percent, with a maximum of $1,500 available for an individual farmers market.

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U.S. farmers plant record-high soybean crop

U.S. farmers planted 78.9 million acres of soybeans, exceeding last year’s planted area by 1.4 million acres, or 2%, and setting a new record high, according to the Acreage report released June 30 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

Aided by favorable weather conditions early in the season, farmers in the Northern and Western Corn Belt and the Northeast increased their soybean acreage. Record-high planted acreage was reported in Kansas, Nebraska, New York and Pennsylvania, while Minnesota and Oklahoma tied their all-time record highs. Iowa continues to lead all states in total soybean acres with 10.2 million acres.

Farmers also planted a near record-breaking 87.9 million acres to corn, up 1.4 million acres from last year but down 1 percent from March. This marks the second consecutive increase in planted acreage to corn and the second highest acreage on record since 1946, only behind 2007.

Illinois and Kansas reported the largest increases in corn acres with both states planting 600,000 acres above last year.

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Coming energy debate must support corn ethanol

As Congress prepares for an Independence Day Recess to be followed by vigorous discussion of a new energy bill, the Ohio Corn Growers Association (OCGA) and National Corn Growers (NCGA) have stepped up a campaign to ensure that corn-based ethanol is part of the formula that brings our country to energy security and independence.

“A surplus of corn exists for all markets,” said Dwayne Siekman, OCGA Executive Director. “With nearly two-thirds of our oil imported, we need to focus on a broad range of domestic fuel solutions. We have a domestic supply that can be used.”

Legislation is before Congress to continue a much-needed incentive, called VEETC (a 45-cents-per-gallon tax credit) for fueling stations to blend ethanol with gasoline. In addition, there is a new energy bill on the horizon, making it an important and critical time to talk about ethanol’s many environmental and economic benefits to our country and the state of Ohio.

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Analysis shows steady progress toward 25x'25 renewable energy goal


Renewable energy produced in the United States between 2004 and 2009 grew by about 23%, according to a report issued by the leaders of the 25x’25 Alliance. Meeting the 25x’25 Goal: A Progress Report, is a 32-page analysis that details the advances made by the renewable energy sector since the Alliance was formed in 2004 toward meeting 25% of the nation’s energy needs with renewable resources from the land by 2025.
The report’s findings come from the leading renewable energy sector groups in the country and government agencies such as DOE’s Energy Information Administration. Other conclusions from the report show that:

  • · U.S. renewable energy consumption at the end of 2009 was 8.3% of total energy consumption, up from less than 6% in 2004.
  • · Ethanol production tripled in the last 5 years with 10.8 billion gallons produced in 2009, while biodiesel production climbed in 2008 to almost 700 million gallons.
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Analysis shows steady progress toward 25x’25 renewable energy goal


Renewable energy produced in the United States between 2004 and 2009 grew by about 23%, according to a report issued by the leaders of the 25x’25 Alliance. Meeting the 25x’25 Goal: A Progress Report, is a 32-page analysis that details the advances made by the renewable energy sector since the Alliance was formed in 2004 toward meeting 25% of the nation’s energy needs with renewable resources from the land by 2025.
The report’s findings come from the leading renewable energy sector groups in the country and government agencies such as DOE’s Energy Information Administration. Other conclusions from the report show that:

  • · U.S. renewable energy consumption at the end of 2009 was 8.3% of total energy consumption, up from less than 6% in 2004.
  • · Ethanol production tripled in the last 5 years with 10.8 billion gallons produced in 2009, while biodiesel production climbed in 2008 to almost 700 million gallons.
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Leaf diseases showing up early

By Ryan McAllister, CCA Team Sales Agronomist for Beck’s Hybrids

Upon traveling a good portion of the state of Ohio and most of eastern Indiana, I am beginning to see leaf diseases earlier than what I would normally expect to see them.  The most common disease present has been common rust followed by (GLS) Gray Leaf Spot, and I am just beginning to be able to find some northern corn leaf blight lesions.  All of which are earlier than normal due to the excessive and prolonged saturated rain events and warm weather.  Be scouting your fields to see if a fungicide application is warranted.  Progression up the plant is what we are looking for. It is important to protect the leaves that are ABOVE the ear leaf. Upon traveling a good portion of the state of Ohio and most of eastern Indiana, I am beginning to see leaf diseases earlier than what I would normally expect to see them. 

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Cover crops on prevented planting acres

By Alan Sundermeier, Ohio State University Extension

Those fields that never dried out to allow crop planting and now qualify as “Prevented Planting” should determine agronomic options to make the best out of this situation.

Producers are advised to check with their crop insurance company and Farm Service Agency on harvest restrictions for cover crops.  Harvest of cover crops may not be allowed until after November 1.

If a burndown or residual pre-emergence herbicide was applied earlier this spring, then check the label for restrictions on planting subsequent crops.

A cover crop will help restore the soil tilth and protect the soil from further wind or water erosion.

Germination of summer seeded cover crops will be improved if drilled versus broadcast.  If hot, dry weather occurs after seeding, a drilled seed has a better chance of establishment.

To prevent cover crops from forming viable seed, mowing or herbicide applications may be needed. 

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Weekly Crop Progress Statistics

Released June 28, 2010, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture.  For
information on “Crop Progress” call Julie Schmidt at (202) 720-7621, office
hours 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET.

Corn:  Percent Silking,
Selected States 1/
————————————–
:      Week Ending      :
:———————–: 2005-
State:Jun 27,:Jun 20,:Jun 27,: 2009
: 2010  : 2010  : 2009  : Avg.
————————————–
:            Percent
:
CO    :   0      NA       0       1
IL    :  15      NA       2       6
IN    :   8      NA       0       2
IA    :   0      NA       0       0
KS    :  11      NA       5      14
KY    :  17      NA       3      14
MI    :   0      NA       0       0
MN    :   0      NA       0       0
MO    :  20      NA       7      19
NE    :   0      NA       0       0
NC    :  80      NA      62      50
ND    :   0      NA       0       1
OH    :   1      NA       0       0
PA    :   0      NA       0       1
SD    :   0      NA       0       0
TN    :  68      NA      24      39
TX    :  51      NA      61      61
WI    :   0      NA       0       0
:
18 Sts:   7      NA       4       5
————————————–
1/  These 18 States planted 92% of
last year’s corn acreage.

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Crop insurance options for prevented planting and replanting

With the late planting season onset of heavy rainfall,  many farmers found that planting or replanting corn and soybeans was just not a feasible option. Farmers unable to plant or replant will want to start exploring their crop insurance options, said George Patrick, Purdue University agricultural economist.

“In some instances, farmers may not have been able to plant their original crop and in other instances farmers may have lost crops due to flooding,” Patrick said. “If producers have followed good farming practices, they may be eligible for different crop insurance benefits — depending on individual circumstances and the type of insurance they have.”

Farmer-based multiple peril crop insurance plans include Actual Production History (APH), Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC), Revenue Assurance (RA) and Income Protection (IP). If planting was prevented because of the weather, an insured producer could choose not to plant a crop and take a payment of 60% of the original yield guarantee level.

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OCGA Board Member Anthony Bush testifies before Congress

National Corn Growers Association Public Policy Action Team Chairman Anthony Bush, a grower from Mt. Gilead, Ohio testified before the House of Representatives Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management during a hearing to review U.S. farm safety net programs. The committee called this meeting to gain grower insight in advance of the 2012 farm bill.
Bush testified as part of a panel which also included representatives from American Farm Bureau Federation, National Farmers Union, National Barley Growers Association and American Soybean Association on June 24.

During his introductory remarks, Representative Collin Peterson expressed that there could be reconciliation next year. If reconciliation takes longer, the farm bill will not include any additional funding and would probably cut funding to a degree.
Acknowledging the difficult fiscal conditions, Bush pushed for more effective risk management tools. Explaining how rising input costs, coupled with an industry that is already capital intensive and operates on thin-margins, have decimated farmers in some areas, he asked the panel to provide growers with the tools they need to continue producing feed, food, fuel and fiber.
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Long-Term Ohio State Research Points to Benefits of Drainage on Field Crops

For every $1 spent on drainage technology, producers get $3 to $4 back in corn and soybean profits, according to long-term Ohio State University research.

Twenty-five years of field studies (from 1984 to 2009) at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) Northwest Agricultural Research Station in Hoyvtille showed that subsurface drainage significantly improved corn and soybean yields on poorly drained soils. Add crop rotation and some sort of conservation tillage practice and production just keeps getting better.

“Overall, a farming system that includes subsurface drainage, crop rotation, and no-till, or other conservation tillage system, provides the best long-term economic and environmental benefits for the farmer,” said Randall Reeder, an Ohio State University Extension agricultural engineer.

Reeder, who also holds an OARDC appointment, said that the long-term research was designed to evaluate the effects of drainage, tillage systems and rotation on corn and soybean yields to provide a better understanding of how to increase yields while maintaining sound conservation practices.

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Energy debate must include ethanol

As Congress prepares for an Independence Day Recess to be followed by vigorous discussion of a new energy bill, the National Corn Growers Association has stepped up its campaign to ensure that corn-based ethanol is part of the formula that brings our country to energy security and independence.

“With nearly two-thirds of our oil imported, we need to focus on a broad range of domestic fuel solutions,” said Darrin Ihnen, NCGA President, a South Dakota farmer. “Legislation is before Congress to continue much needed incentives and there is a new energy bill on the horizon, making it an important and critical time to talk about ethanol’s many environmental and economic benefits to our country.”

Front and center in the NCGA campaign is a new television ad using powerful images and common sense to stress the importance of ethanol. It will air starting Monday, June 28, on local news programs in Washington and on major cable channels such as Fox, CNN and MSNBC.

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Crop Insurance and Vomitoxin In Wheat: What are Farmers Options?

By Chris Bruynis, Assistant Professor/Extension Educator, OSU Extension

Producers that carry multi-peril crop insurance policies subsidized and reinsured by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (as overseen by the Risk Management Agency (RMA)) may be eligible for quality loss adjustments if the reason for the loss in value is due to a covered event such as the excessive precipitation received this spring. Reports coming from the elevators on harvested wheat indicate that not only are wheat yields lower than expected, but vomitoxin levels are high, ranging from 5 to 10 parts per million (ppm) in Northwest Ohio.

In order for producers to protect their rights, it is imperative to report any damage in the required time frame and seek advice from the insurance company before proceeding with harvest or destruction of the damaged crop. Failure to do so may jeopardize the claim. Crop insurance policies require that farmers notify their company within 72 hours of noticing a loss.

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Legalities of Vomitoxin in wheat for buyers and sellers

By Robert Moore, Wright Law Co. LPA

Head scab is causing legal headaches for buyers and sellers of Ohio wheat.The unusually wet spring has predictably caused disease problems in Ohio’s wheat crop. In addition to head scab and other more common diseases, vomitoxin is being found in this year’s crop. Vomitoxin is a mycotoxin that causes suppressed appetite in livestock and can be harmful to people as well.

Producers with a contract

Producers who have a contract with a buyer must look to the contract to determine their rights. All provisions, including any small print on the back of the contract, must be read entirely before assessing legal rights. The language of the contract is what matters; any verbal agreements made outside the contract have very little effect in enforcing legal rights. Even if the producer and buyer agree to certain terms, if the terms do not find their way onto the contract then the parties are probably not bound by the terms.

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Wet fields still foiling farmers

Farmers who can’t get into their cropfields to work because of excessive June rainfall shouldn’t surrender to Mother Nature, Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service specialists say.

There was no shortage of  in the month’s first 23 days, leaving thousands of acres of corn, soybeans and hay either in standing water or in drenched soils, and producers desperate to tend to their crops.

There’s still time for growers to work their fields if weather conditions improve and soils dry, said Tony Vyn, cropping systems specialist.

On the positive side, the rain, heat and humidity has accelerated corn crop development — so much so that many crops have outgrown the ability of some insects to feed on them, Vyn said. That rapid growth, however, is quickly making weed control more difficult and delaying necessary nitrogen fertilizer applications.

“I would encourage farmers not to give up on those applications and to keep trying,” Vyn said.

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OSU Research Points to Benefits of Drainage on Field Crops

 

For every $1 spent on drainage technology, producers get $3 to $4 back in corn and soybean profits, according to long-term Ohio State University research.

Twenty-five years of field studies (from 1984 to 2009) at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) Northwest Agricultural Research Station in Hoyvtille showed that subsurface drainage significantly improved corn and soybean yields on poorly drained soils. Add crop rotation and some sort of conservation tillage practice and production just keeps getting better.

“Overall, a farming system that includes subsurface drainage, crop rotation, and no-till, or other conservation tillage system, provides the best long-term economic and environmental benefits for the farmer,” said Randall Reeder, an Ohio State University Extension agricultural engineer.

Reeder said that the long-term research was designed to evaluate the effects of drainage, tillage systems and rotation on corn and soybean yields to provide a better understanding of how to increase yields while maintaining sound conservation practices.

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Soybeans find their way into OSU printers

Ohio State University kicked off a new “Soy Toner Alliance” to celebrate its use of soy-based toner in many of the university’s laser printers.

The effort has been spearheaded by the university’s printing facility, UniPrint, which maintains about half of the estimated 7,000 printers on the Columbus campus. UniPrint will be using soy-based toner in any printer it maintains for which cartridges are available, currently totaling about 700. Those printers print about 800,000 pages per month.

“It is not simply about using a new product,” said E. Gordon Gee, university President. “It’s about staking our claim that this university and its leadership role in this state is making sustainability a very important part of who we are.”

The event was held at the university’s first LEED-certified “green” building on campus, the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center. The 4-H Youth Development program is part of Ohio State University Extension, housed in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

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Soybeans find their way into OSU printers

Ohio State University kicked off a new “Soy Toner Alliance” to celebrate its use of soy-based toner in many of the university’s laser printers. The effort has been spearheaded by the university’s printing facility, UniPrint, which maintains about half of the estimated 7,000 printers on the Columbus campus. UniPrint will be using soy-based toner in any printer it maintains for which cartridges are available, currently totaling about 700. Those printers print about 800,000 pages peOhio State University kicked off a new “Soy Toner Alliance” to celebrate its use of soy-based toner in many of the university’s laser printers. The effort has been spearheaded by the university’s printing facility, UniPrint, which maintains about half of the estimated 7,000 printers on the Columbus campus. UniPrint will be using soy-based toner in any printer it maintains for which cartridges are available, currently totaling about 700. Those printers print about 800,000 pages per month. “It is not simply about using a new product,” said E.

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