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Ohioans are playing a major role in the farm bill debate

Anthony Bush, Vice President of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association (OCWGA), is currently serving as the Chairmen of the NCGA Public Policy Action Team that has spearheaded a national effort to shape the next farm bill. We recently had the chance to talk with him on the subject. The complete Q&A will be featured in the October issue of Ohio’s Country Journal.

OCJ: The OCWGA made quit a stir at the last Commodity Classic with regard to shaping the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Policy on commodity title programs for the next farm bill. Could you share some of the background and the official policy resulting from that meeting?

Anthony: I was part of a small group of board members that last winter made a trip to Indianapolis, Indiana. The idea was to sit down with other State organizations and have a discussion about what we really believed in. … Continue reading

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Ohio Crop Progress Report – September 19th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 18th 2011

The average temperature for the State was 61.1 degrees, 3.9 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, September 18, 2011. Precipitation averaged 0.53 inches, 0.34 inches below normal. There were 89 modified growing degree days, 20 days below normal. Reporters rated 4.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 16, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 9 percent short, 75 percent adequate, and 16 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Fields were still wet from the previous week’s rain, but began to dry and allowed producers to get back in their fields. Field activities included tilling wheat stubble, planting cover crops, hauling manure, harvesting corn for silage, and preparing storage bins and equipment for fall harvest.

As of Sunday September 18th, corn in dough was 96 percent, three percent behind the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Crop disease assessment for 2011

By Dave Nanda,
Director of Genetics and Technology for
Seed Consultants, Inc.

Before the summer of 2011, it was generally assumed that high temperatures and humidity would cause high incidence of corn diseases. But the diseases did not spread where it was hot and dry, even though lower leaves had lesions present. We speculated that perhaps it was too hot and dry for corn and soybeans and also for leaf diseases. Was that a correct assumption?

Well, after crisscrossing the states of Indiana from Warsaw, Valparaiso, Decatur, Brookston, Kokomo, Seymour, Scottsburg, Terre Haute, Jamestown, New Castle, Batesville, Shelbyville, Versailles, Indiana to Bradford, Celina and Washington Court House in Ohio, during our Kick-off meetings, field days and crop scouting trips, and observing a lot of corn and soybean fields, I came to the conclusion that our assumptions were correct. If is too hot and dry for corn and soybeans, it is also not favorable for the disease organisms.… Continue reading

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Trupointe shows off new South Charleston grain facility

Trupointe has changed the landscape in South Charleston with their remodeled grain facility that includes a new grain bin that will hold more than 720,000 bushels of corn. A new dumping area will also allow corn, beans and wet corn all to be unloaded simultaneously.

Randy Broady, Director Grain Operations for Trupointe shares the details on the new facility and why they built it.

Trupointe Randy Broady longContinue reading

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Study finds more effective way to dry ethanol, reduce costs

Purdue University researchers have found an alternative environmentally friendly and energy-efficient way to dry corn ethanol, and their proof is in the pudding.

Michael Ladisch, a distinguished professor of agricultural and biological engineering; Youngmi Kim, a Purdue research scientist; and Ahmad Hilaly, director of process research at Archer Daniels Midland, found that the shape and structure of tapioca pearls are ideal for removing water from ethanol. Their findings were reported in the July issue of the journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

After fermentation, ethanol contains between 6% and 12% water, which must be removed to make it fuel-grade. Many ethanol plants use corn grits, which absorb water, or molecular sieves, silica-based particles with tiny pores that only retain water molecules. Ladisch and Kim found that tapioca pearls work better than the conventional corn grit adsorbents.

“Any starch will absorb water. That’s how you cook rice or pasta,” Kim said.… Continue reading

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No-till wheat burndown tips

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

Herbicide options for burndown of existing weeds prior to planting of no-till wheat include glyphosate, Ignite, Gramoxone, Sharpen, and dicamba.  Dicamba labels have the following restriction on preplant applications – “Allow 10 days between application and planting for each 0.25 lb ai/A used”.

A rate of 0.5 lb ai/A would therefore need to be applied at least 20 days before planting.  We have, as usual, been receiving questions about the safety and legality of 2,4-D use prior to wheat planting.  We do not know of any 2,4-D product label that supports this use of 2,4-D.  There is some risk of stand reduction and injury to wheat from preplant applications of 2,4-D.

The primary targets for a preplant burndown in wheat are the small, emerged winter annual weeds that can overwinter and have a negative effect on wheat the following spring.  This includes marestail (horseweed), chickweed, deadnettle, annual bluegrass, mustards, etc. … Continue reading

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Bean leaf beetles feeding on pods

By Ron Hammond, Ohio State University Extension pathologist

With soybeans reaching the R6 growth stage, full seed, the primary insect we still need to concern ourselves with is the adult bean leaf beetle. This true second generation (although the third group of adults observed this season) is the group that will overwinter to become active again in 2012. Prior to that happening, these insects will feed on the most tender part of the plant, that being the pods. In fields where the pods have started turning yellow and brown, the pod feeding is stopping and the adults will be leaving in search of “greener pastures”. However, they will enter other fields that are still green, where they have the potential to cause significant injury. Growers should maintain a watch on those fields to prevent pod feeding from reaching high levels. Treatment is usually indicated when pod feeding reaches 10-15% and beetles are still present and actively feeding.… Continue reading

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Time to re-negotiate cash rental rates

By Chris Bruynis, Ohio State University Assistant Professor & Extension Educator

With the late planting this spring, farmers will be harvesting somewhat later than normal this fall. The late harvest will challenge farmers to get wheat planted on time and crops harvested before winter weather arrives. Many times farm rental arrangements are discussed following harvest, but this year farmers and landowners may want to get this completed before harvest begins. This will allow both parties the necessary time needed to arrange a rental agreement beneficial to both parties.

One of the more common questions asked of Extension Educators is what is an appropriate cash rent? Establishing an appropriate cash rental rate for a farm is difficult and is often influenced by several factors. While it is likely that each situation will have some features that make it unique, Craig Dobbins, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University states the following items in this list are common considerations for many situations.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – September 12th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11th 2011

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, September 11, 2011. Precipitation averaged 1.75 inches, 1.23 inches above normal. There were 100 modified growing degree days, 26 days below normal. Reporters rated 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 9, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Rains this week helped to revive crops, but prevented some field work. Those able to get into fields tilled wheat stubble, planted cover crops, hauled manure, and began corn harvest for silage.

As of Sunday September 11th, corn in dough was 93 percent, which was seven percent behind 2010 and three percent behind the five-year average. Corn dented was 56 percent, compared to 89 percent last year and 79 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress Report – September 12th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11th 2011

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, September 11, 2011. Precipitation averaged 1.75 inches, 1.23 inches above normal. There were 100 modified growing degree days, 26 days below normal. Reporters rated 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 9, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Rains this week helped to revive crops, but prevented some field work. Those able to get into fields tilled wheat stubble, planted cover crops, hauled manure, and began corn harvest for silage.

As of Sunday September 11th, corn in dough was 93 percent, which was seven percent behind 2010 and three percent behind the five-year average. Corn dented was 56 percent, compared to 89 percent last year and 79 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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USDA report has corn in Ohio down five bushel from August

From the USDA National Agriculture Statics Service in Ohio.

Based on conditions as of September 1, Ohio’s average corn yield is forecast at 153 bushels per acre, down 5 bushels from the August 1 forecast and 10 bushels below last year’s state yield of 163 bushels per acre. Total production is forecast at 508 million bushels, down 5 percent from 2010. Growers expect to harvest 3.32 million acres for grain in 2011, 50,000 acres more than in 2010.

Soybean yield is forecast at 46 bushels per acre, up 2 bushels from the August 1 forecast but down 2 bushels from the 2010 state average. Total soybean production for Ohio is forecast at 215.3 million bushels, down 2 percent from the previous year. Harvested acreage is forecast at 4.68 million acres, up 90,000 from 2010.… Continue reading

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USDA report meets corn expectations, offers surprises

USDA released its latest Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports Monday morning.

USDA trimmed its estimate of national average corn yield to 148.1 bushels per acre from the August estimate of 153 bushels per acre. That’s a slightly greater cut than the average trade estimate, at 148.8. The corn crop was pegged at 12.5 billion bushels from 84.4 million acres harvested while demand dropped off.

“The reduction is not a surprise but the severity of how quickly they are posting poor yields is. The September report indicated the U.S. corn crop would have an average yield of 148.1 bushels per acre. Just two months ago with the July report USDA had pegged the corn yield at 158.7 bushels per acre,” said Doug Tenney, with Leist Mercantile in Circleville. “Corn demand continues to be reduced as the yields have come down the past two months. With the September report, USDA reduced corn demand by 400 million bushels.… Continue reading

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Harvest provides opportunities for weed evaluation

Take advantage of the elevated view from the combine cab to survey and assess the effectiveness of your weed management program this fall.

“A field free of weeds during harvest is very desirable and represents an outcome that will require increased management as weeds continue to adapt to modern crop production practices,” said Aaron Hager, University of Illinois Extension weed specialist.

Many observations have been made recently that waterhemp and horseweed are frequently appearing in corn and soybean fields across Illinois. Hager’s recent field visits have indicated that seed production on these mature plants has been successful, suggesting a preharvest herbicide application may do little to reduce the viability of these mature seeds.

“There are many reasons that these two particular weed species have successfully completed their life cycle in corn and soybean fields,” he said. “One reason is the occurrence of herbicide resistance. Glyphosate resistance in Illinois waterhemp and horseweed populations is known to occur, and we suspect this will become increasingly common in future growing seasons.… Continue reading

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Are wheat acres getting harder to justify?

By Matt Reese

Wheat had another tough year in 2011, which leaves many farmers again wondering if the crop is worth keeping in the crop rotation. Corn and soybean prices remain strong, head scab and quality issues are a significant concern and yields have been lackluster — all factors stacking the cards against planting wheat again this fall.

Dan Wagner farms in Hardin and Hancock Counties and has long been a believer in the importance of including wheat in his crop rotation, but another disappointing year has him re-examining the benefits of wheat.

“The wheat was off last year and this year the disease levels seem to be better, but the yields are worse,” Wagner said. “Wheat looked great coming into May, but then we started seeing the tile lines and I knew it was too wet. The water killed it in the low areas and in other places there was a head, but there was nothing in it.… Continue reading

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Grain value chain collaboration

The National Corn Growers Association and the American Soybean Association brought together key industry stakeholders to start a discussion about how to best begin construction of a framework for addressing biotech events and impacts on end use markets. Acknowledging that all parts of the value chain share a common goal of an uninterrupted flow of corn, soybeans and technology, attendees shared ideas and insights on finding a solution to disruptions that could potentially impact growers.

NCGA CEO Rick Tolman said NCGA and ASA chose to host this meeting to provide the entire industry with an open space in which to find ways to improve communication. Following Tolman’s remarks, NCGA President Bart Schott addressed the conference on the organizations’ goals for the dialogue. In doing so, he noted that each party plays a role in on-farm profitability and, as such, a valuable one for growers across the country. He stressed the importance of recognizing one another’s strengths and working collaboratively to build a bright future.… Continue reading

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