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Ohio prevented planting wheat deadlines

The problems of the late planting season have been compounded by the cool damp September and the resulting harvest delays will likely result in challenges getting wheat planted on a timely basis this fall.

By Oct. 9, Ohio’s winter wheat was only 5% planted, 47 percentage points behind last year and 36 points behind the five-year average. As farmers face another round of showers on already soggy soils, it could be pushed back even further.

Farmers in Ohio who are prevented from planting wheat because of a natural disaster, must report the acreage to the Farm Service Agency (FSA) within 15 calendar days after the final planting date.  Ohio has 2 different deadline dates, either Oct. 20, 2011 or Oct. 31, 2011 depending on which county you farm in.

Producers that farm in 25 counties in Ohio, have until the final planting date of Oct. 31, 2011 to timely plant fall wheat. 

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Use care when making hybrid decisions this fall

Though growers can use harvest data to make decisions for next year’s seed corn, a Purdue Extension corn specialist says they should look at a variety of field conditions before deciding on hybrids.

This year’s crop experienced water stress on both ends of the spectrum with flooding in the early spring and drought in late summer. Bob Nielsen said those conditions may not lead to a balanced view of hybrid performance.

“We all want to take those mental notes as we’re harvesting, but it’s important to be cautious about over-reacting,” he said. “Hybrid performance in a single field, good or bad, is only a single snapshot of its potential.”

Nielsen said the top criterion for hybrid selection always is yield potential, but consistency of yield also is important.

“Acceptable hybrids for your farm are those that exhibit high yields over a wide variety of growing conditions,” he said. “The hybrid doesn’t have to win every trial, but it should be near the top of all of them.”

Nielson said growers also should consider tolerance to stresses such as disease, drought and excess water.

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Don’t forget to plan fertility during harvest

By Brian Essinger, DeKalb/Asgrow Territory Manager

I know we are in the middle of harvest, but with soybeans coming off you are beginning to make fertility decisions right now.

Here are a few tips and guidelines to make sure you are not shorting yourselves and put enough fertilizer on for maximum yields in 2012. Yields are better than expected in many places throughout Ohio and that means more nutrients were removed from the soil. Your fertility decisions this fall will impact your yield in 2012. Do not short yourself.

1.   Fertilize every field every year no matter which crop you are rotating to or which crop you just harvested. I am going to give you information on the big three macro nutrients, but we are seeing more micronutrient deficiencies each year. Check with your retailer on how to cover your Macro and Micro needs.

2.   Variable rate is the most profitable, efficient, and economical method because it gets what you need where you want it.

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Don't forget to plan fertility during harvest

By Brian Essinger, DeKalb/Asgrow Territory Manager

I know we are in the middle of harvest, but with soybeans coming off you are beginning to make fertility decisions right now.

Here are a few tips and guidelines to make sure you are not shorting yourselves and put enough fertilizer on for maximum yields in 2012. Yields are better than expected in many places throughout Ohio and that means more nutrients were removed from the soil. Your fertility decisions this fall will impact your yield in 2012. Do not short yourself.

1.   Fertilize every field every year no matter which crop you are rotating to or which crop you just harvested. I am going to give you information on the big three macro nutrients, but we are seeing more micronutrient deficiencies each year. Check with your retailer on how to cover your Macro and Micro needs.

2.   Variable rate is the most profitable, efficient, and economical method because it gets what you need where you want it.

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Fall weed control can prevent cutworm problems

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension entomologists

We like to remind growers that fall weed control of winter annuals in corn is an excellent preventive management tactic for black cutworm the following spring.  By providing a weed-free seedbed in the spring, the likelihood of black cutworm problems in the spring will be lower.  Adult moths migrate from the south each spring and lay their eggs on weeds, with chickweed perhaps the most well-known host for eggs.  Black cutworm caterpillars then move to corn when weeds are killed.  Thus, a fall herbicide application not only rids the field of the weeds, but also removes potential sites for egg laying.  When considering the benefits of a fall herbicide application, do not forget the added benefit of black cutworm management.

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Prices respond to October Crop Report

On Oct.12, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service forecast corn production at 12.4 billion bushels, down 1% from the September forecast and down slightly from the 2010 production estimate in the Crop Report.

If realized, this will be the fourth largest production total on record for the United States. Based on conditions as of Oct. 1, yields are expected to average 148.1 bushels per acre, unchanged from the September forecast but down 4.7 bushels from 2010. If realized, this will be the lowest average yield since 2005. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 83.9 million acres, down 1% from the September forecast. Acreage updates were made in several states based on administrative data.

“The October 12 crop report yielded few surprises, ending for a short time speculation about the size of the U.S. corn and soybean crops. In recent days the trade has been lowering their ideas of the U.S.

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USDA Lowers Projections for 2011 Crops

The U.S. corn and soybean crops are both slightly smaller than earlier expected, according to Wednesday’s monthly USDA Crop Production report.

Corn is forecast at 12.4 billion bushels, down 1% from last month’s estimate and slightly off 2010’s production. Soybeans are seen at 3.06 billion bushels, also down 1% from last month’s guess and 8% lower than a year ago.

In Ohio, corn is projected at 495.880 million bushels, compared to 2010’s 533.01 million. Average yield = 154 bushels per acre, which was 153 a month ago and 163 a year ago.

Beans in Ohio projected at 208.84 million bushels, compared to 220.32 last year. 46 bushels per acre average yield which equals last month and is close to the 48 bushels per acre last year.

Mike Zuzolo from Global Commodity Analytics goes over the National numbers with Ty Higgins and how they may impact the markets Wednesday.

Zues 10.12.11.mp3

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Yield Reports from Across Ohio

Soybeans

County: Union
Yield: 60
Moisture: 14%
Variety: Asgrow 3431s

County: Crawford
Yield:62
Moisture: 11%

County: Darke
Yield: in the 50’s
Moisture: 10%

County: Wayne
Yield: 62-77
Moisture: 13%-17%

Corn

County: Marion
Yield: 260/dry
Moisture: 22%
Hybrid: Agri Gold 6533VT3

 

County: Muskingum
Yield: 275
Moisture: 24%
Hybrid: Monsanto DKC 61-21

County: Crawford
Yield: 217
Hybrid: AgriGold A6389VT3   

County: Clark
Yield: 155
Moisture: 22
Hybrid: Agri Gold 6533 vt3

County: Delaware
Yield: 256
Moisture: 15%

County: Delaware
Yield: 220
Moisture: 22%

County: Wayne
Yield: 201-251
Moisture: 21%-27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also received a report yesterday of Asgrow 3431s averaging 60 bu/acre with moisture of 14% in Raymond(Union County)

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Re-examining corn stocks

Although the USDA’s estimate of the Sept. 1, 2011 inventory of old-crop corn is old news, there are ongoing questions surrounding the quarterly stocks estimates. For corn, quarterly stocks estimates have not been well anticipated since June 2010, said a University of Illinois agricultural economist.

“The June 1, 2010 estimate of stocks was surprisingly small and implied feed and residual use during the previous quarter that was too large. The Sept. 1, 2010 estimate of stocks was larger than anticipated based on the level of June 1 stocks but seemed to ‘correct’ for the small estimate in June. The implied feed and residual use for the 2010-11 marketing year based on that estimate was reasonable,” said Darrel Good.

The Dec. 1, 2010 and March 1, 2011 estimates of stocks were marginally smaller than expected and implied a high rate of feed and residual use during the first half of the marketing year, 8% above that of the previous year, he said.

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Between the Rows-October 10, 2011

“We got behind on GDDs in September when it was so cool, but we have caught up with the 30-year average with the warm weather and it has really moved the crop along. We just started chopping silage about an hour ago. That is the first we’ve chopped silage because the fields were wet. We should’ve been chopping silage three or four days ago, but the corn is not pulling the moisture out and the fields are staying wet. We’re a good month late on the silage.

“The rest of the corn maturity is moving along fast. There are a lot of ear molds on the tips and there are some leaf blights from all of this rain we had in the last month, but the silage looks good so far.

“The last week really moved the soybeans along, and we’re going to start harvest today. There has been quite a bit of progress over the weekend on beans in the area.

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Ear rots to watch for

By Dave Nanda, Director of Genetics and Technology
Seed Consultants, Inc.

There was quite a bit of corn in Ohio and Indiana, especially, south of I-70, that was planted late this year. This was followed by excessive rain in the spring and then heat and drought subjected the crops to more stress. Then, to add insult to injury, it became cold and started to rain in late September when it was of little value to this year’s crops. These conditions have been very conducive to the development of ear rots. I have seen three major diseases that cause ear rots in corn. You can diagnose these by the color of the fungus.

• Diplodia ear rot is the most prevalent disease I have seen this year. It is whitish gray in color and usually starts at the base of the ears and can spread to the whole ear. Infected kernels are light in test weight and not known to produce any toxins

• Gibberella ear rot is produced by a pink colored fungus that generally starts at the tips of the ears.

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Pioneer and Bunge Announce Plenish Contract Program

Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business, and Bunge North America, announced today that they will work with farmers near Bunge’s facility in Delphos, Ohio, to grow Plenish™ high oleic soybeans in 2012.

For the 2012 growing season, Pioneer will contract with soybean farmers in the Delphos, Ohio, area to grow Plenish™ high oleic soybeans that will be delivered to Bunge’s facility for processing. Growers will be eligible for a processor-paid incentive for producing and delivering high oleic soybeans, as well as an additional per-bushel stewardship incentive for this growing season. Pioneer will work closely with growers who are trained in growing specialty crops under identity-preserved conditions to produce Plenish™ high oleic soybeans. Interest from the market continues to be excellent and the 2012 contract program will support ongoing field and oil testing.

“Ohio soybean growers have demonstrated their ability to produce identity-preserved soybeans, and the 2012 contract program will provide them an opportunity to earn more income per bushel than commodity soy production while benefiting the soybean industry,” said Randy Minton, business director at Pioneer Hi-Bred.

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NLCB showing up again in the corn crop

The continued incidence of Northern Corn Leaf Blight in Ohio fields is increasingly concerning to plant pathologists at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

“In the past, we’ve seen leaf blight show up and not cause much of a problem,” said Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist Pierce Paul. “Every single year since 2001 it has shown up in some form or another, which concerns me now because the levels are increasing, and it’s showing up in more fields every year.”

Paul said the continued and increasing incidence of the disease indicates farmers are still planting corn varieties susceptible to leaf blight. He recommended farmers take stock of fields and varieties that are affected by blight this year, and plant resistant varieties in those fields next year.

He said by continuing to plant susceptible varieties, farmers are in essence ignoring the problem, and allowing the disease to further stress plants in the future.

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Stay safe around bins and equipment

Farmers can take steps during harvest season to avoid accidents in grains bins, a Purdue Extension farm safety expert says.

In years like this one when growers may have planted late and had to harvest grain at earlier maturity, low quality grain will translate into spending more time in and around grain bins to check temperatures and moisture content. More time in bins leaves more potential for entrapments. But according to Steve Wettschurack, up to 90% of grain entrapments could be eliminated if farmers did not work alone or enter grain bins when unloading augers are running.

“With a 12-inch auger, it only takes 15 seconds to be in up to your waist, 30 seconds for the grain to be over your head, and within one minute you can be 6 feet under the surface,” he said. “It’s nearly physically impossible to get out in time, and digging around when trapped causes more grain to flow down.”

When growers are out near grain bins, they should consider having one person at the top of the grain bin who can see everything and one person on the ground to make emergency phone calls, Wettschurack said.

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Canal expansion could improve competitiveness

An extensive study coordinated by the United Soybean Board’s (USB) Global Opportunities (GO) program expects a new, larger shipping lane through the Panama Canal to double the area that draws U.S. soy to Mississippi River destinations eventually destined for export through Gulf of Mexico ports.



The soybean checkoff-funded study, conducted by Memphis, Tenn.-based Informa Economics, says the expansion of the Panama Canal, expected to be completed in 2014, “…will eventually alter trade lanes” in the United States and other countries. The in-depth examination, recommended by the checkoff-funded Soy Transportation Coalition (STC), claims a new, larger shipping lane for the nearly 100 year old short-cut between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans will:

• Expand the average area that draws U.S. soy and grain to the Mississippi River for barge transit to central Gulf of Mexico ports from 70 miles to over 150 miles


• Increase the total volume of U.S. soybeans and grain moving through the Panama Canal to export markets by 30 percent

• Result in an approximate 35 cents per bushel savings for elevators within the range of central Gulf of Mexico ports, assuming the ports will dredge to ensure at least a depth of 45 feet to handle larger ships capable of moving through the expanded Panama Canal.



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Every year’s a good for apples, but some tougher than others

By Matt Reese

Anyone who grows anything outdoors was painfully familiar with the wet conditions this spring. The almost constant rain made it tough to get anything done outside. The same soggy conditions that made this spring miserable for humans made productivity even more challenging for the insect pollinators dodging drops while trying to perform their daily tasks. Soggy bees led to lackluster pollination season for Fred Finney’s apple crop on Moreland Fruit Farm in Wayne County. “It just kept raining and the bees weren’t out pollinating,” he said. To worsen the situation, there was a nasty outbreak of fire blight in the orchard. “We had a tremendous strike of fire blight. Moisture and cool weather favor it. Other places had it around Ohio, but it is not widespread,” Finney said. “There is a preventative spray for it, but I don’t know how well it works. The fruit near the fire blight is ruined.

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Every year's a good for apples, but some tougher than others

By Matt Reese

Anyone who grows anything outdoors was painfully familiar with the wet conditions this spring. The almost constant rain made it tough to get anything done outside. The same soggy conditions that made this spring miserable for humans made productivity even more challenging for the insect pollinators dodging drops while trying to perform their daily tasks. Soggy bees led to lackluster pollination season for Fred Finney’s apple crop on Moreland Fruit Farm in Wayne County. “It just kept raining and the bees weren’t out pollinating,” he said. To worsen the situation, there was a nasty outbreak of fire blight in the orchard. “We had a tremendous strike of fire blight. Moisture and cool weather favor it. Other places had it around Ohio, but it is not widespread,” Finney said. “There is a preventative spray for it, but I don’t know how well it works. The fruit near the fire blight is ruined.

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Fall cutting hay issues

By Mark Sulc, Ohio State University Extension forage specialist

The recent damp weather has prevented a timely last cutting of hay across much of Ohio. So is it safe to cut a hay stand now? The answer depends on how much alfalfa and red clover is in the stand, how important it is to you to keep the legumes in that stand, and how badly you need or want the extra hay. For pure grass stands, fall cutting concerns are much less of an issue.

Cutting tall legumes like alfalfa and red clover between now and mid-October will carry some risk to the health of the stand. Legume plants are actively storing energy reserves in the taproots during this fall period that are used for winter survival and re-growth next spring. Cutting now will interrupt that storage process because the plant will use reserves for late fall regrowth, and there won’t be enough time to replenish them before a killing frost.

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RFS changes being considered by Congress

A bipartisan coalition of members of Congress, led by U.S. Representatives Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) and Jim Costa (D-Calif.), heeded concerns of livestock producers that current U.S. renewable fuels policies are artificially manipulating corn prices and putting a strain on corn supplies. On Oct. 5, 2011, the lawmakers introduced the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) Flexibility Act of 2011, which will tie the amount of corn ethanol production required under the RFS to U.S. corn supplies.

“The federal government’s creation of an artificial market for the ethanol industry has quite frankly created a domino effect that is hurting consumers. It is expected that this year about 40% of the U.S. corn crop will used for ethanol production,” wrote Reps. Goodlatte and Costa in a letter to their colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives. “Our legislation will alter the RFS to give relief to our livestock and food producers and consumers of these products.

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