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Southwest Ohio Agronomy Field day Aug. 14

Corn and soybean growers can learn some of the latest techniques in farming, including seeding rate adjustments and weed resistance during an Aug. 14 workshop.

The Ohio State University Extension and Southwest Ohio Corn Growers Association’s Agronomy Field Day at the Fayette County Demonstration Farm runs from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and focuses on corn and soybean production research.

Topics include corn and soybean responses to environment and climate change, soil density and compaction, weed resistance, cover crop management and seeding rate adjustments to optimize corn performance.

Continuing education credits for Certified Crop Advisers will also be available.

No registration is required for the event and lunch will be provided. Health screenings by the Fayette County Health Department, Fayette County Memorial Hospital and OSU Extension experts will be held from 9 a.m. to noon. The Ohio Department of Agriculture will also hold a pesticide collection from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.… Continue reading

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Why aren't rains stopping spider mites?

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, OSU Extension

The question is being asked why the rains aren’t stopping the mites, which would actually be from a fungal pathogen that can decimate the mite populations under wetter and more humid conditions.

Although rainfall reduces risk of damaging spider mite populations, thunderstorms alone will not eliminate infestations, particularly when rain arrives after large mite populations are established and when rain is followed by dry, hot conditions.  Sources in other states’ newsletters suggest that the mite-killing fungus requires temperatures cooler than 85°F, with 90% relative humidity, to produce infective spores. Periods of at least 12-24 hours of relatively cool, moist, and humid conditions are necessary for the fungal pathogen disperse and infect a spider mite population in a field. In “normal” years, these are conditions we often see in mid-August. So although we are expecting these conditions in the near future, we still urge growers to monitor their fields and spray if the mites are alive and actively feeding.… Continue reading

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Why aren’t rains stopping spider mites?

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, OSU Extension

The question is being asked why the rains aren’t stopping the mites, which would actually be from a fungal pathogen that can decimate the mite populations under wetter and more humid conditions.

Although rainfall reduces risk of damaging spider mite populations, thunderstorms alone will not eliminate infestations, particularly when rain arrives after large mite populations are established and when rain is followed by dry, hot conditions.  Sources in other states’ newsletters suggest that the mite-killing fungus requires temperatures cooler than 85°F, with 90% relative humidity, to produce infective spores. Periods of at least 12-24 hours of relatively cool, moist, and humid conditions are necessary for the fungal pathogen disperse and infect a spider mite population in a field. In “normal” years, these are conditions we often see in mid-August. So although we are expecting these conditions in the near future, we still urge growers to monitor their fields and spray if the mites are alive and actively feeding.… Continue reading

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Fungicides can do little for drought stressed soybeans

Applying fungicides to soybeans free of foliar disease problems isn’t likely to help alleviate drought stress and could contribute to fungicide-resistant diseases, says a Purdue Extension plant pathologist.

Soybean growers probably are feeling pressure to apply fungicides as the crop enters the R3 growth stage, regardless of disease presence, based on claims that the products can reduce drought stress, increase photosynthesis and, ultimately, increase yields.

But a series of Purdue University research trials has been unable to confirm those claims.

“We’ve done research on fungicides in the absence of disease for several years now at Purdue. What we’ve found is that when we don’t have disease pressure there – foliar diseases such as frogeye leaf spot or Cercospora leaf blight — we don’t often see an economic benefit from a fungicide application,” Kiersten Wise said. “We know that with soybean prices what they are, that benefit would be something to really capitalize on this year.… Continue reading

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Expiring patents create challenges for seed industry

By Matt Reese

It will not be long before the first Roundup Ready soybeans will lose patent protection in 2014 and farmers will need to remember a few things when that happens.

First, just because the Roundup Ready patent has expired, it does not necessarily mean that the seed can legally be saved for replanting to following year.

“That is the first technology trait that is coming off patent, but it is not the last. One thing soybean farmers need to realize is that they are buying a technology trait and they are also likely buying a genetic trait. Those are controlled by separate patents,” said Rob Joslin, with the American Soybean Association. “They may not be able to keep the seed in 2015 even though the patent has expired. They need to be aware of that and check with their seed provider if they are going to keep seed back.”

And, more importantly, it will be important that, as seed transitions from patented to generic, the proper registrations remain in place for export.… Continue reading

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Another look at a challenging 2012

By Kevin Cool, Beck’s Hybrids Seed Advisor, CCA

To say that 2012 has been challenging would be an understatement. As we get deeper into August it is becoming clearer how the hot and dry weather has affected the crops. You have probably read or heard a lot about the effects of heat and drought on corn pollination. Even with hot and dry weather early in the growing season if weather conditions during and around pollination are near normal, close to average yields can still be obtained. This is why when corn was knee high and we were dry, I felt we could still have a good year. The most critical time would be at pollination.

Unfortunately for many of us, the drought has persisted not only through pollination, but beyond. Just as equally, if not more

important, is that extreme heat has come along with it. During pollination many of us were breaking temperature records with ease.… Continue reading

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Farmers again encouraged to report crop losses

With the continued hot dry weather conditions throughout Ohio, the Farm Service Agency (FSA) encourages farmers to document and report crop losses or low crop yields to their local FSA office.

Producers with crops covered by crop insurance and the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) must report crop losses resulting from a weather-related disaster event within 15 days of the disaster or when the loss first becomes apparent.  Prevented planting must be reported no later than 15 days after the final planting date.

Crop losses are acres that were timely planted with the intent to harvest, but the crop failed because of a natural disaster.  It is important that producers file accurate and timely loss reports to prevent the potential loss of FSA program benefits.

Low yield acreage does need to be reported and producers are encouraged to keep good production records on acreage with a low crop yield to document crop losses.… Continue reading

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Monsanto's efforts to help farmers affected by drought

Monsanto commitment to help 

As U.S. farmers face the worst drought in more than 25 years, Monsanto announced new commitments to support farmers and the rural communities where they live that have been impacted by severe drought conditions:

  1. To support rural communities, the Monsanto Fund is doubling its America’s Farmers Grow Communities funding in counties that have been declared a disaster area by the USDA.
  2. To support farmers who have been financially impacted by the drought, Monsanto is offering additional prepay options and financing assistance for the purchase of their seed. Farmers in impacted areas can call 1-855-379-1212 to discuss their individual situation and explore options with a Monsanto representative.

“Nearly 90 percent of the U.S. corn crop is in regions impacted by drought,” said Mike Stern, U.S. row crops business lead, Monsanto Company. “Monsanto understands that when farmers face crop losses, it makes it more difficult to invest in their business for the following year.

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Monsanto’s efforts to help farmers affected by drought

Monsanto commitment to help 

As U.S. farmers face the worst drought in more than 25 years, Monsanto announced new commitments to support farmers and the rural communities where they live that have been impacted by severe drought conditions:

  1. To support rural communities, the Monsanto Fund is doubling its America’s Farmers Grow Communities funding in counties that have been declared a disaster area by the USDA.
  2. To support farmers who have been financially impacted by the drought, Monsanto is offering additional prepay options and financing assistance for the purchase of their seed. Farmers in impacted areas can call 1-855-379-1212 to discuss their individual situation and explore options with a Monsanto representative.

“Nearly 90 percent of the U.S. corn crop is in regions impacted by drought,” said Mike Stern, U.S. row crops business lead, Monsanto Company. “Monsanto understands that when farmers face crop losses, it makes it more difficult to invest in their business for the following year.

Continue reading

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Drought reducing soybean size

By Laura Lindsey, OSU Extension soybean specialist

The effect of drought during the early stages of soybean reproduction was discussed in a previous C.O.R.N. newsletter article (click here).  As soybeans enter the seed filling stage, how does drought influence seed size?  On average, there are 2,500 individual soybean seeds per pound.  Soybean seeds produced during drought conditions and at high temperatures tend to be smaller than seeds produced under normal conditions.  Smaller seed size means it takes more individual seeds to equal one pound.  When soybeans were grown in a greenhouse at 84°F, seeds produced under moderate water stress were 8% smaller than seeds produced with adequate water (Dornbos and Mullen, 1991).  When the temperature was raised to 95°F, seeds produced under moderate water stress were 29% smaller than seeds produced with adequate water.  This study indicates that seed size is reduced more when water and heat stress occur simultaneously compared to water stress alone.… Continue reading

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Mark Dowden- August 6, 2012

“I think we’ve had almost seven inches of rain on some of our farms in the last few weeks. It may help the corn a little and it is sure doing the beans a lot of good. The pods are really starting to swell up.

“We’re getting a lot of weeds. I am afraid we’re going to have to go back out and spray some spots. We don’t want to go back through the beans again but we have to spray our double-crops yet anyways. We’ve seen some spider mites but we keep getting rains that knock them back a little bit. We’ve found a lot of four bean pods and I think we’re really going to be surprised with some of these soybeans.

“We had really good pollination in the corn, but with the dry weather it started cutting back on the tips. I think that, with this rain, the kernels are filling out a little more.… Continue reading

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Mark Thomas- August 6, 2012

“Things aren’t perfect, but they are pretty darn good up here. We’re just ready to make fourth cutting hay. It looks to be pretty nice, especially compared to third cutting. The sudangrass looks really good and we’re relying on it for quite a bit of tonnage. We got another inch and a quarter over the weekend.

“Every time we got to the point where we thought, if it doesn’t rain, we’ll be in trouble, we got enough water to keep things growing. There are some guys that are chopping corn silage on the early-planted light soils that were hurt the worst. I have heard about some corn appraised for 40 bushels per acre.  We will average 140 or 150 bushels per acre. Our soybeans, except on the light ground, look like they are going to be OK too.

“There is some corn for silage where there was no pollination. The rains have added some moisture, which will help with the tonnage and with the high nitrates.… Continue reading

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Jim Herring-August 6, 2012

“Harvest is going to come fast. I think I see some beans starting to turn already. Harvest is going to be here before you know it. The dry weather pretty well took its toll. These late rains have certainly helped the beans, but my early corn is already dented and these rains aren’t going to do a lot of good.

“I think 150 bushels might be the top end. I think there is a lot with less potential than that. There was a long stretch with no rains and these late rains just did not come soon enough for corn.

“Harvest will depend on stalk quality. If we see stalk deterioration we’ll have to get out there sooner, but it would be a plus if we don’t have to dry any. I think it will probably dry down pretty quickly.

“We got some rain yesterday and the day before and some in late July that will really help fill out the beans.… Continue reading

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Billy Pontius-August 6, 2012

“We’re getting ready for harvest. Things are at a standstill right now. No spraying needs done and we’re just getting everything ready to roll. I would say we’ll get started with harvest in about a month. If you get down around Circleville on the gravel ground, they may start harvest in a couple of weeks. The corn plants were dying, but that little bit of rain helped them to green back up a bit. I don’t know if it will help yield any.

“I’m hoping for corn around 120 bushels. I’ve done some ear counts and there are some decent sized ears and some plants with no ears on them and some plants with nubbins on them. It is really hard to tell.

“If I can hit 120 bushels with $7 or $8 corn we’re talking about the same amount of money or more per acre as 200 bushels at $4.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress – August 6th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS ENDING SUNDAY AUGUST 5, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 76.8 degrees, 4.6 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, August 5, 2012.  Precipitation averaged 0.62 inches, 0.22 inches below normal.  There were 178 modified growing degree days, 26 days above normal.  Reporters rated 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, August 3, 2012.  Topsoil moisture was rated 45 percent very short, 41 percent short, 14 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus.

 FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK

Persistently high temperatures and low precipitation continue to stress crops and livestock.  Even in corn fields that appear normal, kernel count is low.  Spider mites have been reported in soybean fields, and as a result, operators began spraying fields with insecticide.  Herbicide application has also been necessary, as weed pressure is high.  Hay conditions are extremely poor.  Livestock producers have already begun feeding with their existing hay inventories. … Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – August 6th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS ENDING SUNDAY AUGUST 5, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 76.8 degrees, 4.6 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, August 5, 2012.  Precipitation averaged 0.62 inches, 0.22 inches below normal.  There were 178 modified growing degree days, 26 days above normal.  Reporters rated 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, August 3, 2012.  Topsoil moisture was rated 45 percent very short, 41 percent short, 14 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus.

 FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK

Persistently high temperatures and low precipitation continue to stress crops and livestock.  Even in corn fields that appear normal, kernel count is low.  Spider mites have been reported in soybean fields, and as a result, operators began spraying fields with insecticide.  Herbicide application has also been necessary, as weed pressure is high.  Hay conditions are extremely poor.  Livestock producers have already begun feeding with their existing hay inventories. … Continue reading

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Hot, dry weather generating concern about seed supply

By Matt Reese

As farmers across the many parts of the Corn Belt are wondering about the results of their harvest this year, there are also questions about the availability of seed for 2013 after the tough growing season.

“As we look upon the rest of the year we do anticipate that we will have a good supply of high quality seed,” said Jerry Harrington, with Pioneer. “We grow seed from the eastern part to the western part of the Corn Belt. There is a broad array of growing conditions there. Some are good and some are really challenging conditions. We also irrigate about two-thirds of our seed supply. And, at the end of the season, we’ll make an evaluation about whether we need to grow an additional crop in South America, which we have done in years past. That is what we did in 1988. We hope to have it under control, but if you’re a grower in Ohio, I would get in contact with your seed supplier to get your order in early and get it on the books.”

Heat is one of the biggest concerns with seed production.… Continue reading

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Crop insurance reminders for those affected by aflatoxin

Weather conditions have made the fungus aflatoxin a threat to this year’s corn crop. Brian D. Frieden, Director of USDA’s Risk Management Agency’s Springfield Regional Office, offers reminders for producers with crop insurance.

If corn has aflatoxin, notify a crop insurance agent before you harvest the grain, put the grain in storage; or deliver it for sale. An insurance provider will take samples for testing and submit them to an approved testing facility. Depending on the aflatoxin level present, the corn price may be discounted or, in rare cases, the grain will need to be destroyed.

Aflatoxin levels can increase in storage. Therefore, losses are only insurable if the grain is tested at an approved testing facility before being moved into commercial or on-farm storage. A producer may also make arrangements with their insurance provider to leave representative sample areas of the unharvested crop. The adjuster will take samples from these areas for aflatoxin testing.… Continue reading

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Farm Science Review to highlight practices to benefit water quality

By Amanda Meddles, Steve Prochaska and Glen Arnold, OSU Extension

This year Farm Science Review is celebrating its 50th show. It is amazing how far agriculture has come in 50 years. One thing we have learned in those 50 years is how important nutrient placement is for crop production and environmental sustainability. Ohio lakes have been suffering the past few years from excess nutrient loading that has resulted in Hazardous Algal Blooms. Fertilizer and manure used in crop production are sources of nutrients transported to Ohio lakes and rivers via sedimentation, runoff and tile discharge.

In July, Directors of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) announced the Ohio Clean Lakes Initiative. This initiative will start the following specific farm level recommendations: 1) Take soil tests and follow fertilization rates as found in the Tri-State Recommendations and/or OSU Recommendations; 2) No spreading of phosphorus on frozen or snow covered ground; 3) Maintain good nutrient application records; 4) As much as possible, incorporate nutrients into the soil layer or on a growing crop at the appropriate time; 5) Follow the 4R Nutrient Steward guidelines found at: nutrientstewardship.com.… Continue reading

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Mid-America Christmas Tree meeting at Timbuk Farms

The Mid-America Christmas Tree Association held a summer meeting last weekend at Timbuk Farms in Licking County.

Timbuk is amount the oldest and largest Christmas tree farms in the state with scenic rolling hills and rows of trees planted as far as the eye can see.

The meeting included an overview of problem insects, wreath making, small tree management, managing deer damage, pot-in-pot tree production and weed management. Farm owner gave several presentations in the program.

 … Continue reading

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