Home / Crops (page 140)

Crops



April 22nd Ohio Crop Progress Report

Two days were suitable for field work in Ohio during the week ending April 21 according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Rain throughout the State kept farmers from working in their fields for most of the week, particularly in the northern and western parts of the State where heavy rains and flooding occurred. Farmers in areas with less rain were able to do some field work, including planting oats and alfalfa.

The rain has been beneficial to winter wheat, which is in a rapid growth phase. Overall the crop is looking good. Although some field prep activities are ongoing, many producers are waiting for warmer and drier weather to start planting corn.

View the full report

Continue reading

Read More »

Between the Rows, April 22

Doug Longfellow, Darke County

“It is still going to be awhile. We had two inches of rain the first round, about an inch the second round a week later and then about a half inch on Friday. We do not have any excuses left to not be ready. We have had plenty of time. We’re not too concerned yet. We want to get the soil warmed up and the first couple of weeks of May are really the more ideal time for us to plant anyway.

“It looks like we have another chance for another half inch of rain mid week. And hopefully, we’ll see a warm up after that and more of a drying trend. I have only heard of one guy over east of Covington and a guy over by New Carlisle planting anything. They were just out testing their planters.

“I don’t think we’re going to see to much activity in the market until we get into mid-May.

Continue reading

Read More »

Watch for signs of slug feeding after planting

Crop growers should take extra precautions to scout their fields this spring for slugs to try to get control of these plant feeders before they attack corn and soybean plants and cause feeding injury, an Ohio State University Extension entomologist said.

Ron Hammond, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, offers his guidance in videos posted on the Plant Management Network, a nonprofit publisher of science-based crop management information for growers, consultants and other applied audiences.

“The gray garden slug is the most damaging slug in field crops across the county,” he said. “It’s also the No. 1 slug pest problem probably worldwide. And this is the one causing problems in corn and soybeans and other field crops, but especially soybeans.”

The majority of problems with the gray garden slug come at crop planting in the spring, Hammond said. That is when the eggs have hatched and the juvenile slug starts to grow and reaches a size to start heavy feeding.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio agriculture responds to proposed water quality rules

By Matt Reese

The comment period closed earlier this month for the proposed regulations for nutrient management in an effort to improve water quality in Ohio. Of course, agriculture is a key stakeholder in this debate and there were a wide variety of comments from Ohio’s agricultural organizations. One common theme running through the responses to this was that the lack of specifics in the proposed rules made it challenging to offer any specific comments.

These proposed rules are the next step of the process that started back in the summer of 2011 when Governor John Kasich asked the directors Ohio Department of Agriculture, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and Ohio Department of Natural Resources to form a task force to address Ohio’s algae problems. After six months of stakeholder meetings, a report was compiled based on the discussions and was provided to the Kasich administration about a year ago.

In short, the proposed rules establish a fertilizer applicator certification program that would be overseen by the Ohio Department of Agriculture for those applying nutrients to more than 10 acres.

Continue reading

Read More »

The role of seed germination in a successful 2013

By John Brien, AgriGold agronomist

Planting is one of the most anticipated times of years for farmers. The weather warms up, the soils dry out and there is another opportunity for them to try their hands at producing that record yielding corn crop. High yields begin at planting and will not be finalized until harvest. One of the steps to high yield is getting the “dormant” corn seed to germinate.

Germination is simply the process that allows a seed to sprout or begin to grow. Although the definition is simple, the actual process is anything but simple. The germination of a corn seed requires soil moisture to “reawaken” the seed and adequate temperatures to speed along the enzymes and chemical reactions that allow the cells in the corn plant to grow and reproduce.

Corn growers know the importance of germination, but often don’t believe they have much of a role in that process.

Continue reading

Read More »

Supply, weather and planting progress driving markets

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

The supply and demand report provided some complexities for all to digest. Corn ending stocks were increased to 757 million bushels. While we did see a quick huge rally of plus 22 cents for corn that day, it quickly evaporated. Traders had been looking for corn production in Argentina to go down. Instead, it was unchanged. In addition, corn production in Brazil went up more than traders had expected. World ending stocks for corn, soybeans, and wheat all were increased. This was the bearish news that tempered the bullish corn ending stocks increasing less than expected.

Corn used for ethanol increased dramatically in the week following the profoundly bearish grain stocks report of March 28. Ethanol used 89.6 million bushels of corn the first week of April. The previous two weeks were 84.5 million bushels. The huge drop in corn early last month of over a dollar at one time did help improve ethanol margins in a profound fashion.

Continue reading

Read More »

Out smart weeds this season

Common ragweed, giant ragweed and marestail, confirmed resistant to multiple herbicide sites of action in Ohio, are part of a growing group of yield-reducing “watch-out” weeds that are top of mind for farmers across the state.

“To keep these ‘watch-out’ weeds in check, farmers should plan to use a herbicide program that effectively targets the weeds using herbicides with different sites of action,” said Luke Bozeman, Technical Market Manager, BASF. “Incorporating a diverse herbicide program – along with identifying local weed pressures and reviewing previous weed escapes on a field specific basis – will help farmers build an effective weed management plan specific to their farm.”

According to the Weed Science Society of America, weeds cause more yield loss and add more to farmers’ production costs than insects, diseases, rodents, birds, and grazers, such as deer. Experts recommend farmers carefully manage any weeds — resistant or not — with herbicides that offer multiple sites of action, ensuring they don’t turn into the next crop of “watch-out” weeds.

Continue reading

Read More »

Agricultural concerns with proposed Obama budget

President Barack Obama’s 2014 budget proposal recommends cuts of $37.8 billion from farm programs and crop insurance. If adopted, the USDA budget would be $146 billion dollars, which would be a $10 billion dollar cut from fiscal year 2013. And, despite all the talk of budget cuts, the President’s plan would increase government spending by 2.5% over this year.

The proposed $7.4 billion reduction in the federal crop insurance program is of particular concern to various farm groups, including the American Soybean Association.

“As ASA has said many times over, soybean farmers are willing to do our part to address the nation’s fiscal challenges, and we have a vested interest in ensuring that the cuts needed are made in a strategic manner, with all potential consequences taken into account. As many farmers still struggle to recover from the worst drought in generations, now is not the time to make such a deep cut to the federal crop insurance program,” said Danny Murphy, ASA president.

Continue reading

Read More »

Doris Ralston and son carry on the family farm

By Kayla Weaver, OCJ field reporter

When Paul Ralston graduated from high school in 2001 he could have been considered a typical farm boy. An active member of the 4-H and FFA youth programs, he grew up showing cattle and helping on the family farm. He had plans to attend Wilmington College in the fall and hoped to one day return to the farm and work alongside his dad.

However, when he turned 21-years-old in September of 2003, just seven days after his dad lost a two year battle with cancer, Paul found himself in a rather unique situation. He was now staring down the approaching harvest alongside his mother, Doris.

“Michael passed away in September and we had to get through harvest that year. That was the year Paul said, ‘Mom, you’re going to have to learn to run the combine.’ Of course I knew some of it from being in there with Michael,” Doris said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio’s first crop progress report of 2013

Ohio’s initial crop progress report for 2013 was released on Monday. It shows that 1% of corn has been planted in the Buckeye State.

Three days were suitable for field work in Ohio during the week ending April 14 according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. With warmer than usual temperatures, some farmers were able to make progress on field work early in the week. Growers across the state were busy applying fertilizer, lime, and herbicides. Oats were planted, and in a few areas, corn as well. Heavy precipitation from Wednesday on, especially in the northern parts of the State, helped increase soil moisture but halted field activities late in the week. The warmer weather, coupled with precipitation, improved wheat condition.

Here is the complete report.

Continue reading

Read More »

Making agriculture an attractive place for rail investment

U.S. freight railroads are essential to the viability and profitability of U.S. crop producers. Most of the leading corn and soybean producing states — even those with river access — significantly depend on the rail industry to satisfy customer demands.

As more crop production occurs in western states and as export terminals at Pacific Northwest ports increasingly position themselves to address growing demand from Asia, the dependence on rail will likely become more pronounced. Each year, over 900 million bushels (27.5 million tons) of U.S. soybeans are transported by rail. By the year 2020/2021, the volume moved by rail is estimated to increase to 1.4 billion bushels (42 million tons).

Rail is among the most capital intensive industries in the overall economy. It contrasts with other modes of transportation in the fact that it is privately financed and maintained. Billions of dollars are spent every year by freight railroads to augment and maintain their networks.

Continue reading

Read More »

Dow AgroSciences, Monsanto cross-license advanced corn trait technology

Monsanto Company and Dow AgroSciences LLC, a subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, have reached new cross-licensing agreements for creation of the next generation of advanced weed and insect control technology in corn. Monsanto will license Dow AgroSciences’ new Enlist Weed Control System herbicide-tolerant trait for use in field corn. Dow AgroSciences will license Monsanto’s third generation corn rootworm technology, Corn Rootworm III, which is presently under development by Monsanto and offers a new mode of action for rootworm control. The agreement paves the way for introduction (pending regulatory approvals) of next-generation products that build off the current SmartStax platform, which includes Dow’s Herculex and Monsanto’s insect resistance and herbicide-tolerance traits. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

“We actually announced two different agreements that will be very effective in Ohio,” said Ben Kaehler, the U.S. seed general manager for Dow AgroSciences. “Monsanto has become the first corn licensee for our Enlist weed control system.

Continue reading

Read More »

Take time for safety this spring

With sunny days becoming more frequent and soil temperatures rising, a Purdue Extension agricultural safety specialist warns farmers not to let their enthusiasm for spring planting lead to injuries.

Instead, growers need to take a few extra minutes to double-check equipment that has been idle over the winter and keep safety precautions in mind.

“Farmers need to make sure before they go into planting season that the safety guards are in place on their equipment,” Steve Wettschurack said. “Maybe a piece was taken off last fall because it was broken or worn out, but now it needs to be replaced. They should make sure they’ve looked at hydraulic hoses and anything else that might be a yearly repair before heading out to the fields.

“Not cutting corners is important. It only takes a few minutes to make sure a piece of equipment is safe and ready for transport.”

Safety equipment such as headlights, taillights, hazard signs, goggles and gloves also should be checked before planting begins.

Continue reading

Read More »

Project focuses on improving food pantries in rural food deserts

Ohio State University Extension is taking part in a five-year, $4 million grant to help isolated communities increase availability of nutritious foods.

“We’re focusing on areas defined as ‘rural food deserts’ as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture,” said Dan Remley, field specialist in food, nutrition and wellness for OSU Extension and Ohio’s representative on the project’s team. “These are low-income census tracts where a substantial number or share of people are far from supermarkets, generally in the southern and eastern parts of the state.”

The project, called “Voices for Food,” is being led by South Dakota State University and also includes land-grant university researchers in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri and Nebraska.

The team is testing the theory that communities with local food policy councils will have better food security — or less of a hunger problem — than those that don’t, Remley said. Improving food pantries is one of the project’s main goals.

Continue reading

Read More »

FDA listening session on proposed produce safety rule set for April 30

A listening session is scheduled for April 30 to hear comments and concerns about the U.S Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) proposed new food safety rules for fresh produce.

The session will be 1 to 4 p.m. in the Shisler Conference Center on the Wooster campus of Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 1680 Madison Ave. The program is being hosted by the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Ohio State, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Farm Bureau.

“The FDA is coming here because they want to hear from Ohio’s produce growers,” said Ashley Kulhanek, agriculture and natural resource educator for OSU Extension. “They are encouraging comments. Because it’s a proposed rule – not final yet – this is the opportunity to ask questions and make your concerns heard, because once it’s final, it’s done.”

The event is free, but registration is requested. The registration form is online at the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Web page at http://bit.ly/FDAmtg.

Continue reading

Read More »

EU trade talks

As part of the European Union (EU)-United States High-Level Regulatory Cooperation Forum in Washington, American Soybean Association (ASA) Executive Committee member and Greenwood, Del., soybean farmer Richard Wilkins spoke on the importance of including the unique nature of American agriculture and of soybean farming in upcoming negotiations over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

Wilkins noted the importance of the EU as an export market for American soybeans and soy products, but also cited the significant drop in recent exports as a result of EU policies.

“In 1997, we exported 10.3 million tons of [soy] products to EU Member States. However, by 2012 the volume of exports had fallen by over 81% to 1.9 million tons. We believe an important cause for this sharp decline is the EU’s requirements that food products derived from agricultural biotechnology enhancement be labeled, and more recently the EU’s discriminatory policies on biofuel feedstocks under its Renewable Energy Directive (RED),” Wilkins said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Cover crop field day highlights soil health

By Matt Reese

For those interested in improving soil health, today’s field day at David Brandt’s Fairfield County farm has it covered. For the more than 270 people packed into Brandt’s spacious farm shop, cover crops are the focus of the day in presentations from national leaders on the extensive benefits of including a bit more biodiversity in the crop rotation.

Ray Archuleta, with USDA-NRCS in North Carolina, gets very excited about soils and provided a very enthusiastic demonstration with simulated rainfall on soils with different management practices.  The results clearly showed the benefits in the demonstration that Ohio Natural

Resource Conservation Service state agronomist Mark Scarpitti said translates directly into benefits in water quality and soil productivity in Ohio fields.

In addition, an internationally recognized soil health consultant Jill Clapperton talked about the benefits of combining different cover crops in the same fields.

“Plant roots interact with each other. This is about plant chemistry and plant interaction.

Continue reading

Read More »

Farmer Assurance Provision protects farmers

On March 27, President Obama signed into law a bill funding the federal government for the remainder of the fiscal year. This appropriations bill included a provision to mitigate the effects of repeated and future procedural lawsuits from anti-biotechnology activists aimed at driving that technology from the marketplace. Section 735 of the bill was widely supported by many in agriculture including the National Corn Growers Association.

Since the Farmer Assurance Provision was signed into law, it has faced attacks in the media, which have been largely based on a mischaracterization of its provisions. NCGA Trade Policy and Biotechnology Action Team Chair Jim Zimmerman explained what this provision accomplishes, why it is important and how it will protect America’s corn farmers.

“What the Farmer Assurance provision does is temporarily protect growers who plant biotech traited crops that have already been approved by the U.S. regulatory system so that they can continue to grow and harvest their crops without threats from judicial proceedings,” he said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Keep close watch for Palmer amaranth

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension weed control specialist

Palmer amaranth (aka Palmer pigweed) has been fairly accurately characterized as “pigweed on steroids.” In addition to the glyphosate resistance, this weed’s rapid growth, large size, extended duration of emergence, prolific seed production, and general tolerance of many post- herbicides makes it a much more formidable weed to deal with than the other Amaranthus species. The post- herbicides that have activity on Palmer amaranth — Flexstar, Cobra, Reflex, Ultra Blazer, and Liberty — must be applied when

the weed is less than three inches tall.

Palmer amaranth has overall more potential to reduce yield if not controlled well, compared with the other pigweeds. We have at this point confirmed the presence of Palmer amaranth in one large field in southern Ohio, and this population is resistant to both glyphosate and ALS inhibitors. We also have been informed of another possible site just south of Columbus.

Continue reading

Read More »

Planting speed considerations

By Dave Nanda, Ph. D. 
Director of Genetics & Technology 
Seed Consultants, Inc.

What speed should you plant? During the planting season, time is of the essence. There is plenty of ground to cover and time is very limited. Perhaps there is prediction of rains coming and the seed has to get in the ground. The modern planters can go pretty fast and do a good job of planting, however, to maximize the genetic potential of every seed it must be given equal opportunity to produce a plant which is not surrounded by its neighbors and has difficulty getting the sunlight, water and nutrients.

• We used to say that four miles per hour is a good speed for corn planting. More farmers today tend to plant at 5 or 6 miles per hour rather than 4 miles per hour. Results from our studies at the Purdue University Extension Research Farms in 2010 and 2011 indicated that planting at 4 miles per hour might give you a more uniform stand but the difference in yields of 4, 5 and 6 miles per hour planting speed was not significant.

Continue reading

Read More »