Home / Crops (page 12)

Crops



Chlorpyrifos ruling getting another look

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently decided to request a rehearing of a pesticide case before the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. DOJ has asked for a panel rehearing and a rehearing en banc in a case in which the court directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to ban chlorpyrifos, a common and useful pesticide, within 60 days.

“USDA disagrees with the ruling ordering EPA to revoke tolerances and cancel registrations for chlorpyrifos. The decision appears to be based on a misunderstanding of both the available scientific information and EPA’s pesticide regulatory system. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other groups have pointed out significant flaws in the draft chlorpyrifos assessments on which the court based its opinion, and USDA supports EPA’s conclusion that the available scientific evidence does not indicate the need for a total ban on the use of chlorpyrifos. EPA should be allowed to continue its ongoing science-based and expert-led evaluation of chlorpyrifos, which is part of EPA’s registration review program that covers all pesticides,” said Sonny Perdue, U.S.

Continue reading

Read More »

The Xenia effect in corn

By Matt Hutcheson, Seed Consultants, Inc.

The Xenia Effect refers to the effect of foreign pollen on kernel characteristics. Cross-pollination occurs in corn because it is a monecious, which means that it has both male (the tassel) and female (the ear) flowers on a single plant.

The Xenia effect occurs when pollen from the tassel of one corn variety moves from one field to another, landing on the silks of another variety which fertilizes and produces kernels on the ear.

The picture above is an example of the Xenia effect, found by a Seed Consultants’ agronomist. Flint (also known as “Indian” corn) was planted a short distance from a field of hybrid dent corn. Both the flint corn and dent corn were flowering at the same time, allowing the flint corn to pollinate some kernels on the dent ears. The cross-pollination exhibited by the Xenia Effect can influence testing procedures and production of specialty corn crops.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio Crop Progress — September 24, 2018

Hot, Dry Weather Encouraged Harvest

Producers avoided delays and got harvest underway last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA, NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending September 23. Rain received last week mostly fell in southern and eastern Ohio. Harvest moved along well. The decrease in soil moisture levels made for better harvesting conditions. Corn for silage was coming off at a good pace. Corn for grain and soybean harvests began slowly in some areas. Field conditions allowed some produces to plant winter wheat. The average moisture content of corn harvested last week was 22 percent, and the average for soybeans was 14 percent.

Click here to see the full report.

Continue reading

Read More »

Diversified Agri-Services Inc. partners with Axis Seed

Blake and Nicki Rossel, owners of Diversified Agri-Services Inc. are excited to announce they have become a distributor for Axis Seed.

“After careful consideration we feel the unique business model that AXIS provides will be a huge benefit to our customers. We realize there are a lot of seed companies vying for your business, however very few of them are willing to make the effort to understand each operation” Blake said.

Similar to Diversified Ag, Axis Seed is independently owned and counter culture to the trend of consolidation in the agricultural industry. Diversified Agri-Services Inc. has been family owned since it was founded in 1978 by David and Linda Karcher.

“Ohio is different than other areas of the country. What works in Illinois and Iowa may not be the best solution for growers here in Ohio. Blake and his team at Diversified Ag have built a solid business with this same belief.

Continue reading

Read More »

Preparation of grain bins for storage of corn and soybeans

grainbins

By Curtis Young, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

Empty bin treatments for grain bins for storage of corn, popcorn and soybeans

First, before using any product to treat grain bins, always read the most current label for the product to assure that the product is used correctly. This is for the protection of the grain to be stored in the bin as well as for the protection of the applicator of the product. Labels for products are subject to change from one year to the next, product registrations can be changed and/or canceled and rates may be changed. Errors made because of not reading the most current label could result in injury to the applicator or contamination of the grain with a non-labeled product making it unsalable.

 

Bins with perforated aeration floors (a.k.a. “false floors”)

If a bin has had a known insect problem in the recent past where a residual population of the insect(s) could be hidden under the perforated aeration floor, fumigation might be the only option to destroy these hidden insects.

Continue reading

Read More »

Late-season weather impacts corn and soybean growth and development

By Kyle Poling, Pioneer Field Agronomist, Ada, Ohio

Physiological maturity of a soybean seed occurs when the seed has completely lost all green color and turns yellow. At this point grain moisture is still over 50%, but a harvestable moisture of near 13% can be reached in as little as two weeks under good drying conditions. In order to time harvest perfectly, it is necessary to monitor soybean drying very closely. At full maturity (R8), 95% of pods have reached their mature pod color. At the R8 growth stage, only five to 10 good drying days are needed before harvest. Begin checking grain moisture before all the leaves have dropped off all the plants as various stresses can cause soybeans to retain some leaves. It is not uncommon to see a few green leaves and stems on some plants after the pods are fully ripe and the soybeans are dry enough for harvest.

Continue reading

Read More »

Northwest Ohio field-scale barley yield research results

By Eric Richer, CCA, Garth Ruff, Sarah Noggle, Ohio State University Extension

Many growers have heard the discussions of growing winter barley. Small plot data is available from Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Stations (Western, Wooster, Northwest), but little field-scale data has been published. While growing a newly re-introduced crop could be a consideration on your farm, it may not be for everyone.

Throughout the 2018 growing season, we had the opportunity to work with eight growers across nine field-scale, test sites for growing winter malting barley in Northwest Ohio. Growers were from Defiance, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, and Paulding Counties. Each planted small fields of barley that averaged 23 acres in size (range 7 to 63 acres). The variety Puffin was planted on all sites, and two of the sites included the variety Scala in the discussion. These two varieties are both over wintering, two-row malt quality barleys.

Continue reading

Read More »

Surprises across the board for corn, soybeans, and wheat

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Corn was bearish with the U.S. yield at 181.3. Soybeans were higher in spite of larger than expected yields. China soybean imports are declining less than expected tempering bearish numbers for soybeans. Russia wheat exports are unchanged.

It was surprises across the board for corn, soybeans, and wheat.

A news flash from Reuters News and the WSJ from earlier this morning, said, “U.S. proposing new round of trade talks with China in the near future.” That news moved soybeans 12 cents off the day’s lows. Moments before the report release soybeans were 6 cents above the day’s lows.

Harvest is only underway in limited areas across Ohio. Today’s USDA report has producers across Ohio and the Midwest anxious for even a whisper somewhere of friendly news in the grains complex.

The biggest concern today is the U.S. soybean yield, production, and ending stocks. It seems a forgone conclusion those numbers will increase from August.

Continue reading

Read More »

Kernel red streak

By Matt Hutcheson, Seed Consultants, Inc.

One common occurrence observed by growers and agronomists at when corn begins to mature is a red coloring of the normally yellow pericarp of corn kernels. Kernel Red Streak (KRS), pictured top left, results from the development of red pigment in corn kernels caused by wheat curl mite feeding on the kernel seed coat. According to Purdue’s John Obermeyer and Christian Krupke in the 2015 issue 25 of the Pest and Crop Newsletter; “There are two suspected mechanisms causing the red streaking. One is the triggering of anthocyanin, a red pigment, in the pericarp as a response to mite feeding. Hybrids vary greatly in how much and where anthocyanin accumulates (e.g., purple seedling corn under cool, wet conditions). The other is the elicitation of another red pigment, phlobaphene, that determines cob (white vs. red), pericarp (great variability as shown with Indian corn), and silk (yellow vs.

Continue reading

Read More »

Soybean field sports the world’s largest Script Ohio

The world’s largest Script Ohio will be on display this fall in a 100-acre field just east of the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, site of the Farm Science Review.

For the past four years, The Ohio State University’s Precision Agriculture program has demonstrated GPS-guided “smart planting” using multiple corn hybrids. The team brought Buckeye spirit to the field with a simple block “O” in 2015, Brutus Buckeye in 2016, and Ohio State Athletics Block O last year. Now, Precision Agriculture has brought the Ohio State Marching Band’s famous Script Ohio to a soybean field.

“We decided to start and continue this project to show the potential of new multi-hybrid/variety planting technology and demonstrate that it can complete tasks with accuracy and precision to the point of making logos in field scenes,” said Andrew Klopfenstein, senior research associate engineer in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering (FABE), part of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University.

Continue reading

Read More »

Crops looking good, harvest conditions fair for 2018

By Matt Reese

Wow! August proved to be a strong month for finishing out what looks to be a very large corn and soybean crop for many parts of Ohio.

With just a few exceptions, nearly all of Ohio had surplus moisture by the release of the Sept. 2 USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) weather summary for Ohio. A few notable exceptions were Pandora that was 2 inches below normal, Cambridge that was 4.59 inches below normal, Bucyrus that was 4.53 inches behind, and Stow that was almost 6 inches below normal precipitation since April 1. On the flip side, Washington Courthouse has seen 6.52 inches above normal, Newark had more than 8 inches over normal, Circleville is 9 inches above average, and a Cleveland location is a whopping over 10 inches above normal precipitation for this time of year.

August had no shortage of Growing Degree Days either. Again, the vast majority of Ohio locations were well above average for GDD accumulation.

Continue reading

Read More »

A new approach to tissue sampling

By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag Net

Throughout the 2018 growing season, AgriGold agronomist John Brien has been working with farmers to do something a little unorthodox. He is having producers send in tissue samples on a weekly basis.

“Traditionally, tissue sampling has a negative tone to it because no one has been able to correlate that if you have this certain level of something at this certain time, you’re going to get this certain yield, so many academia and agronomists have come to the conclusion that tissue sampling is not important,” Brien said. “But we have taken a different approach and we are systematically tissue sampling, once every week so we can get trend lines. I’m not worried about spikes or valleys. I am worried about the general trend of nutrients in that plant.”

The end goal, according to Brien, is to see if growers are getting enough nutrients to the plant at any given point of the season or if there are big holes somewhere that need to be addressed to fix the production system, offering a different mindset to see what this type of tissue sampling can offer. 

Continue reading

Read More »

No pigweed left behind: Keeping Palmer amaranth and waterhemp at bay

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

The majority of our problems with weed management in corn and soybeans in Ohio now arise from five weeds — giant and common ragweed, marestail, waterhemp, and Palmer amaranth.

These five weeds have found a niche in our production systems through a combination of characteristics, including adaptation to various tillage systems, rapid growth, prolific seed production, tendency to rapidly develop herbicide resistance, germination over a large part of the growing season, and tolerance to even effective herbicides unless small. They are not all equally difficult to control. Do a couple things right and marestail becomes much easier to manage, while Palmer amaranth can require effective implementation of every chemical and non-chemical tool available.

Waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, members of the pigweed family, are relative newcomers here, but ultimately have the most potential to increase the complexity and cost of herbicide programs, and reduce profitability.

Continue reading

Read More »

Herbicide plots on display at FSR

The field appears as a checkerboard: thriving green crops beside squares of shriveling beige stalks.

This was not a farmer’s bad luck. Instead the field was intentionally sprayed with 13 different weed killers to show their effects on various crops as well as the consequences of herbicides that drift from their intended target.

“Would a farmer do this to a field? Absolutely not,” said Harold Watters, an agronomy field specialist with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University.

“The purpose is to share what can happen when things don’t go as planned.”

For farmers, weeds are an increasingly vexing problem as the herbicides that used to kill them no longer work. Just about every year at least one weed in Ohio is shown to survive a herbicide that used to destroy it, Watters said.

The increased use of a herbicide often causes the target weed to become resistant to it, in much the same way that increased use of antibiotics has led to some of them no longer being effective against certain bacterial infections.

Continue reading

Read More »

Western bean cutworm: Final adult moth update

By John Schoenhals, Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Bruce Clevenger, Sam Custer, Tom Dehass, Allen Gahler, Jason Hartschuh, Ed Lentz, Cecilia Lokai-Minnich, David Marrison, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, Eric Richer, Garth Ruff, Jeff Stachler, Alan Sundermeier, Curtis Young, Megan Zerrer, Chris Zoller, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon, Ohio State University Extension

As Western bean cutworm (WBC) adult trap monitoring comes to an end for the 2018 season, we would like to thank everyone for their participation including land owners and farm cooperators who allowed us to place traps in their fields. The week ending August 25, 2018 was our final week monitoring WBC adult moth catches in Ohio as very few adult moths are being reported in the bucket traps. Overall, 23 counties monitored 69 traps and resulted in a statewide average of 0.7 adult moths per trap (51 total captured). This is a decrease from an average of 1.2 moths per trap (76 total captured) the previous week.

Continue reading

Read More »

Combines rolling in Ohio to harvest

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

“All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence.” – Martin Luther King Jr. This quote certainly epitomizes the work of the American farmer as the Labor Day holiday was celebrated earlier this week. Your excellence and hard work is to be celebrated and copied by all. Thank you!

Parts of Ohio are already harvesting corn at this reading. Anderson Ethanol received the first load of new crop corn last week from southern Darke County. It was 107-day maturity, planted in mid-April and at 18.3% moisture. Numerous producers in central Ohio are expecting record or near record corn yields. Reports late August suggested the four best states for corn production are Nebraska, Ohio, Illinois, and Wisconsin. Indications from Illinois stated corn harvest would be starting in the days that followed Labor Day. The worst states for corn production appear to be Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

Continue reading

Read More »

Late-season weather impacts corn and soybean growth and development

By Kyle Poling, Pioneer Field Agronomist, Ada, Ohio

Physiological maturity of a soybean seed occurs when the seed has completely lost all green color and turns yellow. At this point grain moisture is still over 50%, but a harvestable moisture of near 13% can be reached in as little as two weeks under good drying conditions. In order to time harvest perfectly, it is necessary to monitor soybean drying very closely. At full maturity (R8), 95% of pods have reached their mature pod color. At the R8 growth stage, only five to 10 good drying days are needed before harvest. Begin checking grain moisture before all the leaves have dropped off all the plants as various stresses can cause soybeans to retain some leaves. It is not uncommon to see a few green leaves and stems on some plants after the pods are fully ripe and the soybeans are dry enough for harvest.

Continue reading

Read More »

Winter malting barley trial results available

By Laura Lindsey and Raj Shrestha, Ohio State University Extension

Due to growing interest in winter malting barley, we conducted a nitrogen rate and seeding rate trial during the 2017-2018 growing season. The trials were conducted at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station (NWARS) in Wood County, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wayne County, and the Western Agricultural Research Station (WARS) in Clark County. The first-year research reports and Malting Barley Production Guide can be found here: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/winter-malting-barley.

Summary of nitrogen rate results

We evaluated the effect of four spring N application rates: 0, 40, 80, and 120 pounds of N per acre. (Each field received approximately 20 lb N per acre in the fall and cultivar ‘Puffin’ was planted.) Nitrogen was applied at Feekes 5 growth stage. The agronomic optimum N rate (N rate where grain yield was greatest) ranged from 100-119 lb N per acre depending on the location.

Continue reading

Read More »

Garman Feed and Supply joins Axis Seed

Greg Garman is proud to announce that he and Garman Feed and Supply will be joining Axis Seed as a regional distributor. Axis Ohio is representing Axis Seed as an Independent Regional Company for all counties in Ohio. “Our unique business model focusing on the demands of the local Ohio grower is what makes Garmans a perfect partner. Greg understands the importance of supporting local business and the benefit that provides to the community,” said Nathan Louiso, Axis Ohio owner.

Garman Feed and Supply is a family owned third generation company that has been serving the central Ohio area for over 42 years. Greg brings that experience to help farmers make the right decisions for their growing conditions and geography.

“Nathan’s commitment to the local area is what most impressed me. Our customers have different seed needs than those in other areas of the country. With all the consolidation in the industry many have lost sight of the importance of working with someone local,” Garman said.

Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio Soybean Council technology named 2018 R&D 100 Awards finalist

Light Curable Coatings, a bio-preferred floor coating that was developed through funding from the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) and Ohio soybean farmers’ checkoff, has been designated as a finalist for the 2018 R&D 100 Awards. Winners will be announced in November at the fourth annual R&D 100 conference. The R&D 100 Awards program honors the 100 most innovative technologies of the past year. Finalists were selected by an independent panel of more than 50 judges representing R&D leaders in a variety of fields. More information about the awards can be found here.

The coating is a UV-cured, high-performance, bio-preferred floor coating with no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The clean, green soy-acylate-based product delivers exceptionally low cure times and meets or exceeds industry targets for appearance, hardness, adhesion, solvent resistance, and application temperature.

“As Ohio soybean farmers, we can be proud that our checkoff dollars are being used to make products that are worthy of prestigious recognition,” said Nathan Eckel, OSC Research Committee chair and soybean farmer from Wood County.

Continue reading

Read More »