Home / Crops (page 11)

Crops



Ohio corn, soybean harvest near completion

Operators were busy in the fields last week as the State received cool temperatures that averaged 6 degrees below normal, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Reports mentioned significant amounts of tillage, baling, and strip till fertilizer placement occurring in addition to harvest activities. There were 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 10.

Corn jumped to 65 percent harvested, an increase of 16 percentage points from the last report, but still 14 points behind the 5-year average. The average corn moisture content was 20 percent, unchanged from the previous report. Soybeans moved to 86 percent harvested, an increase of 8 points from the previous report, but still 6 points behind the 5-year average. The average soybean moisture content was 14 percent, up one point from last week. Winter wheat was at 94 percent emerged, which was 10 points ahead of the 5- year average.… Continue reading

Read More »

More regular rains take Brazil’s soybean planting to 58%

Brazilian farmers had planted 58 percent of their 2019/20 soybean area by Nov 7, according to a weekly survey conducted by AgRural. That represents a progress of 12 percentage points in one week and keeps the new crop planting pace slightly ahead of the five-year average. There is still a delay, however, in comparison to last year.

Favorable weather conditions seen last week took the area already planted to 94 percent in top-producer Mato Grosso, where the soybean crop develops well so far. The only issue, for now, is that the state will not have new soybeans entering the market as early as in the 2018/19 season, when some farmers were already harvesting in late December.

Mato Grosso grows about 65% of Brazil’s second corn crop, which will be planted right after the soybean harvest, in January and February 2020. That means that a good chunk of the Brazilian corn crop will not be behind schedule or have any significant problem caused by delays in the soybean planting.

Continue reading

Read More »

The Xenia Effect in corn

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

The Xenia Effect refers to the effect of foreign pollen on kernel characteristics. Cross-pollination occurs in corn because it is a monecious, which means that it has both male (the tassel) and female (the ear) flowers on a single plant. The Xenia effect occurs when pollen from the tassel of one corn variety moves from one field to another, landing on the silks of another variety which fertilizes and produces. The picture above is an example of the Xenia effect, found by SC agronomists. Flint corn was planted a short distance from a field of hybrid dent corn. Both the flint corn and dent corn were flowering at the same time, allowing the flint corn to pollinate some kernels on the dent ears. The cross-pollination exhibited by the Xenia Effect can influence testing procedures and production of specialty corn crops.… Continue reading

Read More »

USDA announces establishment of U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program

By Dave Russell, Ohio Ag Net

The interim final rule formalizing the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Program was published in the Federal Register in late October, allowing hemp to be grown under federally-approved plans. Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Marketing and Regulatory Programs, Greg Ibach said the interim rule includes a number of provisions for USDA to approve plans developed by states.

“This includes provisions for tracking the land where hemp is grown, procedures for testing the concentration levels of TCH, procedures for disposing of non-compliant plants, compliance provisions on how to handle violations as a result of inspections on farms, and procedures to share information with law enforcement,” Ibach said. “We are also going to make sure that states that have programs have resources available to manage those plants.”

The new hemp rule enables the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service and Risk Management Agency to determine which USDA programs hemp growers are eligible, including loans and crop insurance.… Continue reading

Read More »

USDA to issue second tranche of trade payments

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will proceed with its second tranche of trade relief payments to American farmers as a result of retaliatory tariffs, USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue said.

“We just have gotten authorization on the second tranche. We’ll be getting it ready hopefully at the end of this month or early December,” he said.

In May, the USDA announced it would again provide payments under the Market Facilitation Program (MFP), valued at $16 billion.

The first round of payments was issued in August and Perdue indicated a third tranche may not be necessary.

“We’re very hopeful that the China negotiations can come to a favorable conclusion. The numbers that we’re talking about right now would be very beneficial to our agricultural producers. We’re hopeful that trade would supplant any type of farm aid needed in 2020,” he said.

MFP provides payments to eligible producers of:

  • Non-specialty crops, including alfalfa hay, barley, canola, corn, crambe, dried beans, dry peas, extra-long staple cotton, flaxseed, lentils, long grain and medium grain rice, millet, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, rapeseed, rye, safflower, sesame seed, small and large chickpeas, sorghum, soybeans, sunflower seed, temperate japonica rice, triticale, upland cotton, and wheat.
Continue reading

Read More »

Corn neutral, soybeans bearish in today’s USDA numbers

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Today’s USDA report had corn production at 13.661 billion bushels, yield of 167.0, and ending stocks at 1.910 billion bushels. Soybean production was 3.550 billion bushels, yield was 46.9, and ending stocks of 475 million bushels.

The market has been anticipating this report for weeks. Anticipation can be highly overrated. Yet, it can also be disappointing as the amount of time and energy spent is quickly forgotten once the report is released. Don’t be surprised to just move on.

Will USDA finally get it right with corn acres and yield? However, with only 52% of the U.S. corn harvested shown on this week’s progress report, it means even less corn had been harvested when USDA compiled and field reports the beginning of November. Many anticipate the corn yield would decline in the last 20% to 40% of harvest. It could easily be the January 10, 2020 report to get a much better handle on corn yields when final 2019 production and yield are released.… Continue reading

Read More »

ARC and PLC enrollment open through FSA

Agricultural producers now can enroll in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs — two U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) safety net programs — for the 2020 crop year. Meanwhile, producers who enrolled farms for the 2018 crop year have started receiving more than $1.5 billion for covered commodities for which payments were triggered under such programs.

“These two programs provide income support to help producers manage the ups and downs in revenues and prices,” said Richard Fordyce, Administrator of USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA). “USDA is here to support the economic stability of American agricultural producers by helping them maintain their competitive edge in times of economic stress. We encourage producers to consider enrolling in one of these programs.”

ARC provides income support payments on historical base acres when actual crop revenue declines below a specified guaranteed level. PLC provides income support payments on historical base acres when the effective price for a covered commodity falls below its reference price. … Continue reading

Read More »

The case for looking at the ARC-IC (ARC-Individual) Program option

By Carl Zulauf and Ben Brown, Ohio State University, and Gary Schnitkey, Krista Swanson, Jonathan Coppess, and Nick Paulson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

ARC-IC (Agriculture Risk Coverage – Individual) has received less attention than ARC-CO (ARC – County) and PLC (Price Loss Coverage). ARC-IC is operationally more complex, thus harder to explain and understand. It pays on only 65% of program base acres while ARC-CO and PLC pay on 85% of base acres. Nevertheless, ARC-IC is worth considering if an FSA farm has one or more of the appropriate production attributes. These attributes include (1) 100% prevent plant acres on a FSA farm, (2) high year-to-year production variability, (3) much higher farm than ARC-CO and PLC yields, and/or (4) acres planted to fruits and vegetables. The prevent plant attribute is more relevant than normal in 2019.

 

ARC-IC overview

  • ARC-IC is a whole farm program option based on the average experience of all covered program commodities planted on the ARC-IC farm.
Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio No-Till Conference features soil health, cover crops and more

By Randall Reeder

We have important topics and 15 speakers to cover them.

The Ohio No-till Conference will be December 5 at Der Dutchman, Plain City. We expect a full house and about 16 exhibitors/sponsors. Program will run from 9:00 a.m. to about 4:00 p.m.

Our keynote speaker is Mark Anson of Vincennes, Ind. The Anson family (3 brothers, plus sons) farms 19,000 acres of no-till with cover crops. (Previously, I incorrectly wrote 10,000 acres.) In 8 years, they have planted a total of 75,000 acres of cover crops. His topic: “Healthy Soils, Healthy Waters, Healthy Life.”

Here are our topics and speakers:

Managing Cover Crops in Spring 2020. Nathan Brause, Cody Beacom, David Brandt, Glenn Harsh, and Eric Niemeyer

Soil Health, No-till and Cover Crops. Mark Anson, David Brandt, and Jan Layman

No-till, global warming and Federal Farm Policy. Bill Richards, Fred Yoder, Ben Brown and Allan Lines

How to Reverse the Impact of Carbon Emissions: Pay Farmers to Bury Them.… Continue reading

Read More »

South American crop update

By Daniele Siqueira, AgRural

Another crop season is underway in Brazil and things have not started exactly well for soybeans. And a poor start to the soybean crop always fuels speculations about the second corn crop, which is planted in the beginning of the year, right after the soybean harvest, and accounts for about 70% of Brazil’s total corn production and almost the entire corn export program. That’s why many people are already asking about the second corn crop planting window. Is Brazil going to cut its corn acreage in 2020 due to the soybean delay?

By Oct 17, Brazilian farmers had planted 21% of their intended area, compared to 34% in the same period a year earlier and also 21% on the five-year average, according to consultancy AgRural.

In top producer Mato Grosso, the soybean planting caught up after a slow start in September, and about half of its area was already planted by Oct 17.… Continue reading

Read More »

Markets have plenty to consider heading into November report

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

U.S. corn exports continue an alarming trend for reduction this fall. With two months into the September to August marketing year, weekly export inspections with the Monday 11 a.m. ET USDA report have seen numerous weeks of disappointing numbers. Many of those weeks saw corn exports at or below the low end of trader expectations. Typically, weekly corn export loadings have outpaced those of soybeans. However, this has not been the case for much of the summer and fall. At the end of October, corn exports were running 60% behind compared to USDA projecting an 8% drop for the year. Corn exports for 2019-2020 were lowered 150 million bushels with the October report. Since May, USDA projections for corn exports have dropped 375 million bushels for a 16% decline. Strong export competition and higher production from Brazil and Argentina has played a major role in the corn export decline.… Continue reading

Read More »

Use plot data to make sound decisions

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

As harvest is completed across the Eastern Corn Belt, seed companies, universities, and growers will have the chance to compile and analyze data from yield testing. One of the most important decisions a farmer will face all year is deciding what variety to plant and in which field to plant it. To ensure that the best possible decision is made next spring, it is important to spend some time looking at yield data. While reviewing data is critical, knowing how to determine whether it is accurate and useful is equally important. Below are some tips for using data to make sound planting decisions next spring.

Look for replicated data

Don’t rely on yield results from one strip plot on a farm or from a single plot location. Look for data from randomized tests that are repeated multiple times and across multiple locations.… Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio corn shy of half harvested, soybeans nearing completion

Combines kept harvesting despite the 1.7 inches of rain the State received last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 3.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 3.

Corn was 49 percent harvested, an increase of 12 percentage points from the last report. The average corn moisture content was 20 percent, a decrease of 1 point from last week. Soybeans were 78 percent harvested, an increase of 8 points over last week. The average soybean moisture content was 13 percent, the same as last week. Fewer growing degree days and cooler temperatures have slowed maturation down for both corn and soybeans, keeping progress behind the 5-year average for all reported categories. High corn moisture content slowed harvest progress across the State, particularly in the northern districts.

Winter wheat planted was just about finished as it reached 96 percent complete. Winter wheat was at 86 percent emerged, which was 13 points ahead of the 5-year average.… Continue reading

Read More »

The (not so spooky) tale of Halloween pumpkins

On a day with no shortage of haunting pumpkins around the corner, many people may be wondering just how the largest, most terrifying of these autumn staples come to be. The answer is not nearly as spooky as the end product. A bit of late night investigation will reveal there is a fair amount of agricultural expertise behind those giant Halloween pumpkins.

Even first-time growers are capable of growing pumpkins in excess of 400 pounds if the seeds are the Atlantic Giant variety, which are available at numerous garden centers and catalogs, according to Mike Estadt, educator, Ohio State University Extension.

“To grow pumpkins in excess of half a ton, it all begins with superior genetics,” Estadt wrote in Growing Giant Pumpkins in the Home Garden, a new Ohioline fact sheet.

Ohioline is OSU Extension’s free online information resource and can be found at ohioline.osu.edu. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.… Continue reading

Read More »

Soy demand getting a boost through Airable Research Lab

By Matt Reese

With an increasing number of consumers looking for environmentally friendly products, there is growing demand for plant-based chemical feedstocks in a wide range of uses (for example, as alternatives to petroleum-based plastics). More companies are finding ways to better serve their customers with bioproducts that can lower costs, provide functional benefits, and reduce the environmental impacts.

One example is Roof Maxx, a soy-based emulsion that can extend the life of roof shingles. The product was developed through a collaborative effort between Roof Maxx Technologies, LLC, the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC), and Battelle in Columbus. Brothers Mike and Todd Feazel sold a successful roofing business to start Roof Maxx Technologies and develop this cost-effective, earth-friendly roofing treatment.

The Feazels have been in the roof replacement business for many years and saw the great need for extending the life of traditional roofing to add value for customers. Roof Maxx restores the flexibility of aging shingles and their ability to repel water, extending the useful life of an existing roof for 10 to 15 years — and at a fraction of the cost of roof replacement.Continue reading

Read More »

Ohio Soybean Council Foundation offering $44,000 in scholarships

The Ohio Soybean Council Foundation (OSCF) is pleased to announce scholarship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The scholarship program encourages undergraduate and graduate students at Ohio colleges and universities to pursue degrees in one of the many academic fields that support the future of the soybean industry including agriculture, business, communication, economics, education, engineering, science and technology.

“The OSCF scholarship program helps eliminate some of the financial burden for students who are committed to strengthening Ohio’s soybean industry,” said Bill Bateson, an Ohio soybean farmer from Hancock County who serves on the OSCF selection committee. “Our scholarships help students studying careers across the value chain, from agronomists to food scientists to ag educators.”

The OSCF scholarship program has awarded over $340,000 in scholarships since 2008.

 

2020-2021 undergraduate scholarships

Seven undergraduate scholarships of up to $3,000 each will be awarded. Also available to one undergraduate student is a $3,000 Robinson W.… Continue reading

Read More »

Non-GMO corn production and purity concerns

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

Many corn growers in the Eastern Corn Belt produce non-GMO corn attempting to capture an additional premium. Depending on the contracting elevator, standard GMO contamination allowances are typically from 0% to 1%. Producing non-GMO corn within the acceptable tolerances of GMO contamination is possible; however, there are several challenges and potential pitfalls that make production of 100% pure non-GMO corn a tremendous undertaking and can keep growers from capturing a premium for their corn. Planting non-GMO seed does not necessarily mean the harvested shelled corn will be GMO free. Tests used by elevators to determine if GMOs are present may not be 100% accurate, but they are a determining factor as to whether a load will be accepted.

If a grower plants non-GMO corn, what could cause GMO contamination?

• Contaminated planting equipment and seed tenders
• Contaminated seed
• Mistakes made in record keeping where hybrids were not correctly identified at planting and/or harvest, leading to contamination
• Adventitious pollen from GMO corn fields can cause cross-pollination of non-GMO corn
• Contaminated combines at harvest
• Contaminated grain carts, wagons, trucks, augers, grain legs, and grain bins.… Continue reading

Read More »

Wheat benefits highlighted in new program for Ohio

Heritage Cooperative, Land O’Lakes SUSTAIN and Campbell Soup Company are teaming up to help Ohio wheat farmers benchmark their stewardship work and strive to continue safeguarding the air, land and water. Together, the companies will seek to enroll 60,000 Ohio wheat acres in the program, which was previously piloted in Maryland and Pennsylvania.

“As a trusted advisor to Ohio farm families and a leader in delivering innovation to the farm gate, Heritage Cooperative is excited to work alongside Land O’Lakes SUSTAIN and Campbell Soup Company to support Ohio farmers’ stewardship efforts,” said Greg Spears, COO, Heritage Cooperative. “Working together, we can have a real impact, helping to safeguard the environment while also helping farmers focus on profit potential and the economic health of their farm.”

With help from their Heritage Cooperative advisor, farmers in Ohio will now be able to use the Truterra Insights Engine from Land O’Lakes SUSTAIN to gather data on their stewardship practices.… Continue reading

Read More »

EPA starting rule making process on application exclusion zones

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding application exclusion zones (AEZ) on Oct. 24.

The EPA proposal would make two major changes for crop producers. Modifying the AEZ so it is only enforceable on a farmer’s property would replace the current regulation requiring farmers to ensure individuals are outside of the pesticide AEZ not only on their property, but off their property as well. The proposal would also exempt farm owners and their immediate family members from the requirement that they leave their home during certain pesticide applications.… Continue reading

Read More »

Markets watching harvest and trade war

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Corn and soybean harvest has been in full swing since early October. Yields continue to be extremely varied across the state. Both corn and soybeans have been pleasantly surprising with moisture levels as mid-October saw many soybeans running 9% to 11% moisture. Corn moisture quickly moved below 18% for many producers. Others could not believe their eyes when corn moistures dipped below 15%. Winter wheat acres were quickly planted as they followed soybean harvest in rapid fashion. The first frost of the season for many areas of Ohio took place the morning of October 13. It brought an abrupt halt to the growing season for late-planted corn and soybeans as well as double-crop soybeans.

The U.S./China trade talks continue, seemingly similar to soap operas, which are years in the running. I am quickly reminded of words from last late spring when some analysts announced, “A trade war can easily last far longer anyone could ever expect.” This current trade war between China and the U.S.Continue reading

Read More »