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Western bean cutworm: Adult moth catches indicate Ohio is past peak flight

By John Schoenhals, Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Amanda Bennett, JD Bethel, Bruce Clevenger, Sam Custer, Tom Dehass, Allen Gahler, Jason Hartschuh, Ed Lentz, Rory Lewandowski, Cecilia Lokai-Minnich, David Marrison, Les Ober, Eric Richer, Garth Ruff, Jeff Stachler, Alan Sundermeier, Curtis Young, Megan Zerrer, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon, Ohio State University Extension

Western bean cutworm (WBC) adult moth catches decreased across monitoring counties in Ohio. For week ending August 4, 23 counties monitored 73 traps (Figure 1). Overall, there was a statewide average of 5.6 moths (406 total captured). This is a decrease from an average of 15 moths per trap (1090 total captured) the previous week. Two consecutive weeks of WBC adult captures indicate that Ohio is past peak flight for WBC adults.

Figure 1. Average WBC adult per trap in Ohio counties, followed in parentheses by total number of traps monitored in each county for the week ending August 4, 2018.

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Bearish August numbers from USDA

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Today’s USDA monthly Supply and Demand Report detailed actual expected corn and soybean yields across Ohio and the Midwest. It was a bearish report for both corn and soybeans. Corn was down 4 cents and soybeans were down 23 cents following the report. Prior to the report corn was down 2 cents and beans were down 10 cents.

The soybean ending stocks were up 205 million bushels due to an average yield of 51.6 bushels per acre. That is up from last month’s prediction of 48.5 bushels per acre. The corn yield was predicted to be 178.4, up from last month’s 174-bushel prediction.

Don’t be surprised that corn and soybean harvest will commence earlier than that of last year. Corn demand could easily be ratcheting higher in coming months. Last month USDA raised U.S. corn exports 125 million bushels to 2.225 billion bushels. The export could reach last year’s level of 2.4 billion bushels.

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Tile Drainage and Soil Health Field Day

By Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

OSU Extension Crawford County will be hosting a Tile demonstration and Soil Health Field day on August 22. The program will start at 9:30 am and run until 2 pm. Cost for the program will be $5 to cover lunch. Throughout the day, participants will have the opportunity to see both commercial and tractor mounted plows in operation. They will have the opportunity to see how to run the tractor plow from the seat and how Intellislope works. While drainage is often the first step to successful no-till and cover crops, it is not the only step. Other presentations will include, Profitable cover cropping with livestock, Managing herbicides for cover crop success, In field soil health testing and interpretation, Planning Grass waterways and Blind inlets to partner with you tile installation, Economics of drain tile installation. Please call the Crawford county extension office at 419-562-8731 to RSVP by August 20th.

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Advanced Biobased Systems Workshop to explore 
growing industry of biobased products

The Advanced Biobased Systems Workshop: Pipeline to Commercialization will bring together leaders in industry and research to explore the development and commercialization of biobased fuels and products.

The workshop, a collaboration between The Ohio State University (OSU) and the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC), will be held Sept. 10 at the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center on OSU’s Columbus campus, with a networking farm tour and barbecue on Sept. 9. Keynote speaker Roger Wyse, a managing partner with Spruce Capital Partners, will discuss the investment community’s perspective in funding biobased technologies.

President of FDC Enterprises, Fred Circle, will speak about managing perennial grasses for energy production. Richard Fitzpatrick with Kreussler, Inc., and Mike Feazel with Roof Maxx Technologies will share their experience with the practical aspects of commercializing biobased products. Barry McGraw, director of product development and commercialization for the Ohio Soybean Council, and Ram Lalgudi, a senior research scientist at Battelle, will share their views on how to successfully develop biobased products.

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Trade wars and dismal prices

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

While Ohio and Midwest producers may be in a good mood as to their yield prospects for corn and soybeans this fall, the mere mention of corn and soybean prices brings a protracted frown. Prior to the angst with all of the U.S./China trade war situation reaching a late May crescendo, December CBOT corn had reached $4.29 while November CBOT soybeans touched $10.60. Earlier this month, both made year-to-date lows as December corn touched $3.59 while November soybeans hit $8.26. Late July, December corn was $3.80 and November soybeans $8.90.

The announcement late July of no additional trade tariffs between the U.S. and the EU tore a hole in the bottom of the gunny sack accumulation of disappointing trade news that has dominated U.S./China trade tariffs headlines since May. That announcement was followed with a promise by EU President Junckner to buy “lots” of U.S. soybeans.

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Some farmers are still keeping wheat in the rotation

By Matt Reese

It is hard not to love the early green-up, the amber waves and the rotational benefits of Ohio’s winter wheat crop, but quality challenges, management issues and prices have eroded away acreage in recent years. In 2017, there were only 435,000 winter wheat acres harvested in Ohio, the lowest acreage on record. Planted acreage for the 2018 harvest was up to 530,000 acres, but still just a fraction of the Ohio acreage from years gone by.

Wheat, however, continues to be a part of the rotation for Ben Bowsher who farms in Allen and Auglaize counties.

“It has fit into our operation for a few reasons. We use it to do some fertility work and tile projects and there is overall profitability with selling the straw and the double-crop soybeans. Wheat also is a cover crop and it a great crop to hold the ground in the fall through the winter and tie up nutrients that could move.

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Japanese beetles in corn and soybean

By Kelley Tilmon, Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension

We have been hearing reports of Japanese beetles in corn and soybean. These beetles are large with a shiny copper and green color. Foliage feeding in corn is almost never economic, though economic damage from silk clipping is possible (though rare). Consider a rescue treatment when silks are clipped to less than ½ inch and, fewer than 50% of the plants have been pollinated, and the beetles are still numerous and feeding in the field.

Japanese beetles will also feed on soybean foliage. While the damage might look startling, it is very rare that this reaches economic levels from Japanese beetle. A rescue treatment is advised when defoliation levels reach 30% in pre-bloom stages, and 20% in bloom to pod fill. These defoliation levels apply to the plant as a whole, not just certain leaves, and can also be used for general defoliation from more than one kind of leaf-feeding insect in soybean.

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Nitrogen deficiency showing up

By Matt Hutcheson, Seed Consultants, Inc.

Due to heavy rainfall and saturated soils during the 2018 growing season, it is not surprising to see some signs of nitrogen deficiency showing up in corn fields across Seed Consultants’ sales footprint. Whether applied pre-plant or sidedressed, patterns of heavy rainfall and wet soils increase the likelihood of nitrogen being lost. Because nitrogen is an essential nutrient for corn plant development and ultimately yield, losses will impact final yields this fall.

When saturated conditions persist, nitrogen can be lost though leaching or denitrification. Leaching (more likely to occur in course-textured soils) is the process where nitrogen is moved down through the soil profile and out of the root zone where it is not available to plants. The severity of nitrogen loss due to leaching is impacted the intensity and duration of rainfall. Denitrification is the process where soil nitrogen is biologically converted to gaseous nitrogen and lost to the atmosphere.

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Ohio Crop Progress — August 6th, 2018

Rains Still Hit or Miss

Milder than usual temperatures and spotty rains spread across the State last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA, NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending August 5. Corn and soybeans conditions improved slightly from last week although some producers were still badly in need of rain. Pastures received some needed rain, but still moved from mostly good into mostly fair condition. Oats harvested remained ahead of the 5-year average. Tobacco began blooming last week.

Click here to read the full report

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Field day will highlight new tools for managing phosphorus

A field day on Aug. 13 from 9 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Dean Farms, 2480 County Road 12C Bryan, Ohio, 43506 will showcase New Leader G5 variable dry rate nutrient applicator equipment with swath width control. The NL5000 G5 allows for pinpoint application accuracy with a spinner-spreader, targeting the right product to the right place without sacrificing productivity. Field pan tests will demonstrate the technology in action. In addition, Ohio State University experts will discuss the latest research informing phosphorus application rates and the new P-risk assessment tool. Host Allen Dean will round out the presentations with cover crop learning and demonstration plots.

Speakers/demonstrations include:

  • Marty Wolske, New Leader: New Broadcast Equipment Technology – A Practical Solution for Dry Nutrient Application
  • Steve Culman, OSU: Tri-State recommendations update
  • Libby Dayton, OSU: P risk-index tool
  • John Schoenhals, Williams County Extension: Phosphorus Placement and Soil Interactions
  • Allen Dean, Cover Crop Sales & Service

For questions, to RSVP and for more event information contact Karen Chapman, kchapman@edf.org, 740-739-1809.

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ASA joins Farmers for Free Trade

The American Soybean Association (ASA) announced that it will be joining Farmers for Free Trade.
Farmers for Free Trade is a bipartisan campaign co-chaired by former Senators Max Baucus and Richard Lugar that is amplifying the voices of American farmers, ranchers and agricultural businesses that support free trade. The American Soybean Association joins the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Pork Producers Council, and multiple other agriculture, trade and commodity groups that are partnering with Farmers for Free Trade to strengthen support for trade in rural communities.
“We need strong, likeminded allies to galvanize farmers in a collective call for solutions from the Administration and Congressional leaders on advocating for new trade agreements and expanding international markets. We have watched for some time and with appreciation the efforts of Farmers for Free Trade and the spirit of collaboration it has fostered to help ag and those industries related to agriculture and are happy to join their efforts,” said Ryan Findlay, CEO of ASA.

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Time (almost) for checking yields

By Harold Watters, Ohio State University Agronomist

I am already getting comments about corn yield expectations. More than a couple of growers have told me they may have their best crop ever — but I point out that it’s still a bit early. I have others who say they haven’t seen rain in two weeks, it’s too late, and “corn is toast.” Again, it is a bit too early to say that. But by the time this column appears you should be able to get a reasonable idea on corn yield — soybeans not so much.

So how do we check crop yield?

The easy way is to wait until maturity then combine the crop and run it across the scales. That works best, and for soybeans is the most reliable way, but sometimes we want an estimate before that point.

For corn, this from the Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide page 71, by Peter Thomison OSU’s state corn specialist is a good way to estimate yields.

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Cover crop survey

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension

Ohio State University weed scientists are in the process of planning cover crop research, and could use your input. Cover crop use has been on the rise in recent years, most commonly for the preservation of soil, reduction in nutrient loss, and suppression of weeds they can provide. Feedback from this survey will allow us to perform trials that are in line with practices common in the state of Ohio and thus generate more impactful results. Thank you!

Please take our five second survey!

https://osu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3CzwGMFUxMeW7u5

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Stress during corn reproductive stages a concern

By Roy Ulrich, Technical Agronomist for Dekalb/Asgrow

The growing season has been quite variable across the region this year so far. For some regions of Ohio, the start to the growing season may have been slightly delayed, but once it was fit the crop went in relatively fast and stress free. For other regions, the growing season was extremely late to get started and each management step has been a struggle to accomplish between all the rains. So, whether your crop started out stress free or it has been under stress since the beginning, the state’s corn crop has transitioned from the vegetative stages into the ever-critical reproductive stages.

The first of those stresses to show up in fields this year was foliar diseases. The warm, humid weather conditions of late June were the perfect environment to develop foliar diseases in corn. The development and progression of these foliar diseases leads to a direct loss in the photosynthetic ability of a plant as leaf surface area is compromised and lost for photosynthesis.

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No pigweed left behind: Late-season scouting for Palmer amaranth and waterhemp

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension

If you don’t already have to deal with waterhemp or Palmer amaranth, you don’t want it. Ask anyone who does. Neither one of these weeds is easy to manage, and both can cause substantial increases in the cost of herbicide programs, which have to be constantly changed to account for the multiple resistance that will develop over time (not “can,” “will”). The trend across the country is for them to develop resistance to any new herbicide sites of action that are used in POST treatments.

Preventing new infestations of these weeds should be of high priority for Ohio growers. When not adequately controlled, Palmer amaranth can take over a field faster than any other annual weed we deal with, and waterhemp is a close second. Taking the time to remove any Palmer and waterhemp plants from fields in late-season before they produce seed will go a long way toward maintaining the profitability of Ohio farm operations.

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American Farmland Trust targets soil health through Conservation Innovation Grant

American Farmland Trust was awarded a highly competitive 2018 Conservation Innovation Grant (CIG) from USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. Authorized by the 2002 Farm Bill, CIG helps develop the tools, technologies and strategies to support next-generation conservation efforts on working lands.

“Through programs like the Conservation Innovation Grants Program, we’re fueling the development of new and exciting tools and technologies, helping farmers improve their agricultural and conservation outcomes,” said Leonard Jordan, NRCS Acting Chief.

The grant will fund a new AFT project called “Accelerating Soil Health Adoption by Quantifying Economic and Environmental Outcomes & Overcoming Barriers on Rented Land” that is designed to give farmers and landowners the quantitative evidence they need to make better conservation decisions.

One barrier to wider use of soil health practices that improve water, save soil, protect climate, and often increase profit has been limited quantitative data proving their benefits.

AFT will work in six watersheds across five states (California, Illinois, Ohio, New York and Virginia) to quantify the benefits experienced by 24 farmers who have already implemented soil health practices like reduced tillage, cover crops, nutrient management, crop rotation and more.

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CENTURO first new N inhibitor approved in 40 years

CENTURO, a next-generation nitrification inhibitor for anhydrous ammonia and UAN from Koch Agronomic Services (Koch), has received approval from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and is now available for order in the U.S. The approval marks the first time in more than 40 years that a nitrification inhibitor has received FIFRA registration.

“Our team of agronomists, chemists and technology specialists have spent the past nine years working on a technology that could make a grower’s nitrogen investment more efficient. Today, we have CENTURO, which has been scientifically proven to reduce nitrogen loss and optimize nutrient-use efficiency,” said Justin Hoppas, executive vice president of Koch. “Farmers throughout the Corn Belt are facing growing economic and environmental pressures, and we understand fertilizer additives must perform and pay off. CENTURO is now available as one more tool in a grower’s toolbox to increase agricultural efficiencies and optimize their crop nutrition investments.”

CENTURO works to protect applied nitrogen and keep the valuable nutrient available in the root zone in its ammonium form where it’s less susceptible to loss through denitrification and leaching.

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Japanese beetle in corn and soybeans

By Kelley Tilmon, Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension

We have been hearing reports of Japanese beetles in corn and soybean. These beetles are large with a shiny copper and green color. Foliage feeding in corn is almost never economic, though economic damage from silk clipping is possible (though rare). Consider a rescue treatment when silks are clipped to less than ½ inch and, fewer than 50% of the plants have been pollinated, and the beetles are still numerous and feeding in the field.

Japanese beetles will also feed on soybean foliage. While the damage might look startling, it is very rare that this reaches economic levels from Japanese beetle. A rescue treatment is advised when defoliation levels reach 30% in pre-bloom stages, and 20% in bloom to pod fill. These defoliation levels apply to the plant as a whole, not just certain leaves, and can also be used for general defoliation from more than one kind of leaf-feeding insect in soybean.

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Keep scouting for potato leafhoppers in alfalfa

By Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Mark Sulc, Kelley Tilmon, Ohio State University Extension

If you grow alfalfa, now is the time to scout those fields for potato leafhoppers. Integrated pest management (IPM) scouts are finding potato leafhoppers (PLH) widely distributed across a number of alfalfa fields. PLH numbers have ranged from low to well above economic treatment thresholds. In addition, alfalfa growers have been calling about yellow leaves on alfalfa, one of the classic PLH damage symptoms. Alfalfa growers should consider regular field scouting for PLH because this is one of the economically significant pests of alfalfa.

The potato leafhopper is a small bright green wedge shaped insect that arrives in our area each year on storm fronts from the Gulf Coast region. PLH is a sucking insect. PLH feeding causes stunting of alfalfa plants resulting in yield loss. Excessive stress on plants by heavy PLH feeding can result in yield reductions in the current as well as subsequent cuttings.

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Soil health, corn disorders, weeds topics of upcoming Soil and Water Field Night

Soil health, corn disorders, and weed management are topics set to headline the upcoming Soil and Water Field Night, hosted by The Ohio State University South Centers.

This free educational opportunity, presented by OSU South Centers in partnership with Pike Soil and Water Conservation District and Pike County Solid Waste Management District, will take place Thursday, Aug. 16 with registration beginning at 5 p.m. A light supper will immediately follow, then attendees will depart on a wagon tour and attend field research presentations by OSU faculty and staff.

 

Corn disorder

Ohio is among the top-10 producers of corn in the United States, having grown the crop on more than 3 million acres, and it plays a major role in the state and nation’s economy.

“With the changing climate, we are experiencing more frequent extreme weather conditions. These natural stresses and poor management can cause some physiological disorders in corn,” said Rafiq Islam, who heads the Soil, Water and Bioenergy program at the Ohio State University South Centers.

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