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A Manageable Pest

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Anytime the words “invasive species” are used to describe a new pest, people take notice. That is the hope when it comes to the brown marmorated stink bug. Kelley Tilmon, Ohio State University Extension entomologist, hopes farmers will take advantage of the new Stink Bugs pocket guide and quick reference card. The new pocket guide and quick reference cards were produced with funding from the North Central Soybean Research Program and the Ohio Soybean Council and the soybean checkoff. Stink bugs are pests that may decrease soybean yields and quality significantly without proper management. “The good news it this is a manageable pest,” Tilmon said. “Most of our pyrethroid insecticides are effective against stink bugs. The use of organophosphates is not generally recommended.” Stink bugs attack soybeans by inserting their piercing and sucking mouthparts directly into the pod and developing seed. “In essence, they feed on the good stuff that the seed needs to develop,” Tilmon said.

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Latta Listening Session Addressed Impacts of a Challenging 2019

By Dusty Sonnenberg, Field Leader

The extensive prevented planting acres in Ohio and limited yield potential for many acres of late-planted crops have generated plenty of discussion about the impact to farmers, agribusiness, and rural communities.

United States Congressman Bob Latta represents the largest farm-income producing district in Ohio and recently participated in a listening session with farmers and agribusiness people in Williams County to learn about the details of the situation.

“Everyone in the chain is going to be impacted, such as the folks that sell the seed, fertilizer, herbicide, equipment parts. There is a whole line of people besides the farmers who will feel the impact,” Latta said. “It is really important that I hear from the farmers. This thing hasn’t really hit hard yet. I think people are going to start to feel it in about two more months. The farmers see it right now.

“I can’t tell you how many calls I have had with the undersecretary of agriculture to explain what’s happening here and keeping him updated, making sure his department was aware of just how bad it really is here in Northwest Ohio.

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Unplanted acres and unanswered questions about Lake Erie’s algal bloom

By Dusty Sonnenberg, Ohio Field Leader

“So where is it coming from, and what more can we do?” This is a question many northwest Ohio farmers ask themselves, knowing they will likely be the ones to take the blame as the subject of the Lake Erie algal bloom regularly makes headlines in the paper and on the evening news. Considering the weather challenges faced during the planting season of 2019, many farmers are left perplexed.
According to Jason Williamson of the Williamson Insurance Agency, the question is valid. “Looking at the prevent plant numbers released by the USDA, 30% of the acres in the counties we cover in Northwest Ohio are prevent plant,” he said. “Wood County alone reported over 50% prevent plant.”

Those are acres where farmers did not get a crop in the ground, and the vast majority did not apply any fertilizer this spring or summer. With that being said, the lake is on track to have its fourth or fifth largest harmful algal bloom (HAB) on record.

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Use Caution Choosing Cover Crops for SCN-Infested Fields

There are plenty of agronomic incentives to plant cover crops this fall. But for fields infested with soybean cyst nematode (SCN) there’s one watch-out: Don’t feed the nematodes.

“If you have SCN in your fields, we encourage you to consider cover crops that are nonhosts and poor hosts for SCN,” says George Bird, Michigan State University nematologist and leader of The SCN Coalition. “It’s the single most damaging pest in North American soybeans, and once it’s in your fields, you can’t eliminate it completely, but you can manage it.”

Researchers from The SCN Coalition have compiled this list of cover crops that are suitable to grow in SCN-infested fields without fear of providing a host for the nematode. The list is based on the results of checkoff-funded research published by Iowa State University and North Dakota State University. Work with your crop advisors and local experts to decide what’s best for your situation.

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Sorting Out the Soybean Herbicide Resistance Traits

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension

The world of soybean herbicide resistance traits has gotten more complex over the past several years. The good news is that we have new options for control of herbicide-resistant weeds, although it can be a little difficult to sort out which one is best for a given situation and whether the possible downsides of certain traits are tolerable. The following is a quick rundown of what’s available and some things to consider Mark Loux OSU Soybean Researcher Field Leaderwhen selecting seed. This is not meant to be an extensive evaluation/description of these systems. We also do not attempt to include all of the possible seed trade names. For ratings of herbicide effectiveness on certain weeds, check the tables in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.”

Roundup Ready (RR1, RR 2 Yield, etc.) –the original herbicide resistance trait. Resistant to glyphosate which can be applied anytime up through R2.

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A “dryer” soybean harvest

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

The challenging wet weather this spring may lead to wet soybeans for harvest this fall around Ohio.

“We’ve dried soybeans before, and we can do it again,” said Mic Robertson, Branch Manager for The Jewell Grain Company.

The Jewell Grain Company has locations in both Defiance and Henry counties. For those crops that did get planted, the expectation is that harvest will be delayed, and a good deal of mechanical drying will be necessary. According to the USDA, more than 42% of the acres in Defiance County, more than 32% of the acres in Henry County, and more than 46% of the acres in Williams County did not get planted this year. Neil Nofzinger, manager of Stryker Farmers Exchange, a farmer owned cooperative in Williams County, is concerned especially about the soybean situation.

“Many of these soybeans were planted later than usual. In 2018 most of the soybeans were planted the first week of June.

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How long do we have for late planted soybeans to mature?

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

In a typical year, by the time Farm Science Review rolls around, many of the soybeans in the state of Ohio have started to turn a bright fall yellow color and are quickly drying down. Some fields in the southern regions have even been harvested. But it has not been a typical year. In the southern part of the state much of the crop is on schedule, and the yield has already been determined. In the northern regions, many beans are still very green and filling pods. Soybeans found in the R4 to R5 growth stage not uncommon in much of northern Ohio. The question among many growers is, “How long do we have to complete the grain fill period?”

According to the University of Missouri and Missouri Soybean Center, soybean yield is a product of the number of days of seed fill and rate at which the seeds fill.

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How AI and Unmanned Aerial Systems Could Change the Future of Crop Scouting

Crop scouting may transition from a boots-on-the-ground job to an artificial intelligence endeavor in the sky thanks to research from The Ohio State University (OSU) and investments made by the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) and soybean checkoff. Dr. Scott Shearer, professor and chair of OSU’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, and his team are testing the use of small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) in Ohio fields to automate the scouting process with data collected directly from the crop canopy.

Drone flying over an Ohio soybean field with stinger platform suspended beneath.

To dig deeper, OSC talked with Dr. Shearer about the project and the impact it could have on Ohio agriculture.

Q: Tell us about your current work with AI and sUAS.

A: We have developed a stinger platform suspended beneath a multi-rotor drone, or sUAS, to insert sensors into the crop canopy. These sensors capture high-resolution imagery from within the plant canopy, which can be used for real-time plant stress classification.

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Unplanted acres and unanswered questions about Lake Erie’s algal bloom

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

“So where is it coming from, and what more can we do?” This is a question many northwest Ohio farmers ask themselves, knowing they will likely be the ones to take the blame as the subject of the Lake Erie algal bloom regularly makes headlines in the paper and on the evening news. Considering the weather challenges faced during the planting season of 2019, many farmers are left perplexed.
According to Jason Williamson of the Williamson Insurance Agency, the question is valid. “Looking at the prevent plant numbers released by the USDA, 30% of the acres in the counties we cover in Northwest Ohio are prevent plant,” he said. “Wood County alone reported over 50% prevent plant.”

Those are acres where farmers did not get a crop in the ground, and the vast majority did not apply any fertilizer this spring or summer. With that being said, the lake is on track to have its fourth or fifth largest harmful algal bloom (HAB) on record.

Continue reading

Read More »

How AI and Unmanned Aerial Systems Could Change the Futureof Crop Scouting

Crop scouting may transition from a boots-on-the-ground job to an artificial intelligence endeavor in the sky thanks to research from The Ohio State University (OSU) and investments made by the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) and soybean checkoff. Dr. Scott Shearer, professor and chair of OSU’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, and his team are testing the use of small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) in Ohio fields to automate the scouting process with data collected directly from the crop canopy.

Drone flying over an Ohio soybean field with stinger platform suspended beneath.

To dig deeper, OSC talked with Dr. Shearer about the project and the impact it could have on Ohio agriculture.

Q: Tell us about your current work with AI and sUAS.

A: We have developed a stinger platform suspended beneath a multi-rotor drone, or sUAS, to insert sensors into the crop canopy. These sensors capture high-resolution imagery from within the plant canopy, which can be used for real-time plant stress classification.

Continue reading

Read More »

Challenges continue in Northwest Ohio

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

The challenges of the incredibly difficult planting season for northwest Ohio are spilling over into the harvest season.

With over 80% of his 2019 corn and soybean crops not getting planted, Glen Newcomer, an Ohio Soybean Association member from Williams County, said weed control and planting cover crops has become the next big issue in 2019.

“We sprayed all our acres early in the season to prevent them from going to seed, and to keep out any noxious weeds,” Newcomer said.

All their fields were sprayed, and they were able to go back and follow-up with tillage on several of them.

“We stopped planting soybeans on June 30. After that date, we knew the odds were not in our favor for getting a crop to maturity,” Newcomer said.

Once planting had ended, the next step was to develop a plan for how the remainder of the acres would be handled in preparation for the 2020 crop year.

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Use caution choosing cover crops for SCN-infested fields

There are plenty of agronomic incentives to plant cover crops this fall. But for fields infested with soybean cyst nematode (SCN) there’s one watch-out: Don’t feed the nematodes.

“If you have SCN in your fields, we encourage you to consider cover crops that are nonhosts and poor hosts for SCN,” says George Bird, Michigan State University nematologist and leader of The SCN Coalition. “It’s the single most damaging pest in North American soybeans, and once it’s in your fields, you can’t eliminate it completely, but you can manage it.”

Researchers from The SCN Coalition have compiled this list of cover crops that are suitable to grow in SCN-infested fields without fear of providing a host for the nematode. The list is based on the results of checkoff-funded research published by Iowa State University and North Dakota State University. Work with your crop advisors and local experts to decide what’s best for your situation.

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Managing take-all and other diseases in wheat after wheat

By Pierce Paul, Ohio State University Extension

I never recommend planting a small grain crop after another small grain crop, as planting wheat after barley for instance or barley after wheat increases the risk of diseases such as head scab and take-all. However, this year, some growers do not have much of a choice; soybean will not be harvested in time in some fields for them to plant wheat, so they will either have plant wheat after corn harvested for silage or after wheat. If you do end up planting wheat after corn or wheat, here are a few tips that could help to reduce the risk of having major disease problems next spring:

  1. Select and plant the most resistant variety that you can find. Check the Ohio Wheat Performance Trials report (https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/wheattrials/table6.asp?year=2019), and select a variety with resistance to as many diseases as possible. Give priority to head scab, Stagonospora, and powdery mildew resistance.
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A “dryer” soybean harvest

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

The challenging wet weather this spring may lead to wet soybeans for harvest this fall around Ohio.

“We’ve dried soybeans before, and we can do it again,” said Mic Robertson, Branch Manager for The Jewell Grain Company.

The Jewell Grain Company has locations in both Defiance and Henry counties. For those crops that did get planted, the expectation is that harvest will be delayed, and a good deal of mechanical drying will be necessary. According to the USDA, more than 42% of the acres in Defiance County, more than 32% of the acres in Henry County, and more than 46% of the acres in Williams County did not get planted this year. Neil Nofzinger, manager of Stryker Farmers Exchange, a farmer owned cooperative in Williams County, is concerned especially about the soybean situation.

“Many of these soybeans were planted later than usual. In 2018 most of the soybeans were planted the first week of June.

Continue reading

Read More »

How long do we have for late planted soybeans to mature?

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

In a typical year, by the time Farm Science Review rolls around, many of the soybeans in the state of Ohio have started to turn a bright fall yellow color and are quickly drying down. Some fields in the southern regions have even been harvested. But it has not been a typical year. In the southern part of the state much of the crop is on schedule, and the yield has already been determined. In the northern regions, many beans are still very green and filling pods. Soybeans found in the R4 to R5 growth stage are not uncommon in much of northern Ohio. The question among many growers is, “How long do we have to complete the grain fill period?”

According to the University of Missouri and Missouri Soybean Center, soybean yield is a product of the number of days of seed fill and rate at which the seeds fill.

Continue reading

Read More »

Corn observations can save harvest time

By Luke Schulte, Beck’s Hybrids

Walking corn throughout the past few weeks has revealed a significant number of fields showing nitrogen (N) deficiency. Several factors have contributed to these N shortages, but what is imminent is that stalk strength and standability will likely be compromised in these situations.

Contributing factors of N shortage include:

  • There were less than ideal planting conditions resulting in poor root structure.
  • Tillage performed in wet conditions has created a density layer for root restriction. This has also led to decreased aggregate stability and poorer water infiltration.
  • There were dry conditions during the rapid N-uptake period. Beginning at approximately V8-V10, N uptake is approximately 7 pounds per day for three weeks. The majority of N is mobilized into the plant with water.
  • There was the potential for significant N loss with pre-plant or early N applications.

Beginning at approximately the R2 growth stage (kernel blister), the corn plant begins to remobilize most of the necessary N for grain fill from the stalk and leaves.

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Crop progress continues, despite dry weather

Dry, warm conditions prevailed last week which aided crop progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 15.

Crops were progressing rapidly in warmer conditions. Producers started to harvest corn silage last week. Corn silking and soybeans blooming were complete. There was no improvement in corn and soybean conditions. Other hay second cutting was nearly complete. Alfalfa hay fourth cutting made a jump in progress last week but was still behind last year’s pace.

There was very little rain across the State last week and topsoil moisture levels continued to decrease. Crops were maturing well with warm temperatures but rain was needed to improve conditions and pasture regrowth. Dry conditions allowed more opportunities for fieldwork, including tillage, manure management, mowing and spraying.

The full report is available here.

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Sorting out herbicide resistant traits in soybeans

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension

The world of soybean herbicide resistance traits has gotten more complex over the past several years. The good news is that we have new options for control of herbicide-resistant weeds, although it can be a little difficult to sort out which one is best for a given situation and whether the possible downsides of certain traits are tolerable. The following is a quick rundown of what’s available and some things to consider when selecting seed. This is not meant to be an extensive evaluation/description of these systems because including all the possible configurations of herbicide use and the stewardship stuff would probably kill the possibility that anyone reads the rest of the article. We also do not attempt to include all of the possible seed trade names. For ratings of herbicide effectiveness on certain weeds, check the tables in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.”

 

Roundup Ready (RR1, RR 2 Yield, etc.) – the original herbicide resistance trait.

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Repairing the soil after a record-setting 2019

By Dusty Sonnenberg, Ohio Field Leader

It is no secret that 2019 will go down in the history books as one of the most challenging years for production agriculture in much of the country. Flooding and frequent rain events delayed and, in many cases, prevented planting on millions of acres across the Corn Belt.

“I’ve never seen anything like it, this is a year for the record books,” said Joe Nester, a certified crop advisor from Williams County who has worked in agriculture for over 42 years and as an independent consultant at Nester Ag for the past 28 years. “We went into the season already wet, and then had rain every other day. Even the crops that were planted are not going to yield near what farmers typically expect.”

He estimates that of the acres they work on through Nester Ag, at least 65% were not planted. Statewide in Ohio there were 1,485,919 prevented planting acres in 2019, with the bulk of those in the northwestern part of the state, according to the USDA’s Farm Service Agency.

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New law bulletin explains the new hemp frontier

By Ellen Essman, Senior Research Associate, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural & Resource Law Program

These days, industrial hemp never seems to leave the news. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit declined to decide a case involving the interstate shipment of hemp between Oregon and Colorado by way of Idaho. Hemp is illegal in Idaho, where the product was seized and the driver was arrested, even though the 2018 Farm Bill allows for the interstate transportation of hemp. The Ninth Circuit, reviewing the case, determined that the state court actions needed to be decided before federal courts could hear the case. Ohio also made news this summer when the state passed a bill legalizing hemp in the state.

All of these developments involving industrial hemp may leave you with many questions. What is hemp? What did the 2018 Farm Bill do? What does Ohio’s new law do? Most importantly, can I grow and process hemp right now?

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