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2019 Ohio Crop Progress Update



Ohio corn, soybean harvest near completion

Operators were busy in the fields last week as the State received cool temperatures that averaged 6 degrees below normal, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Reports mentioned significant amounts of tillage, baling, and strip till fertilizer placement occurring in addition to harvest activities. There were 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 10.

Corn jumped to 65 percent harvested, an increase of 16 percentage points from the last report, but still 14 points behind the 5-year average. The average corn moisture content was 20 percent, unchanged from the previous report. Soybeans moved to 86 percent harvested, an increase of 8 points from the previous report, but still 6 points behind the 5-year average. The average soybean moisture content was 14 percent, up one point from last week. Winter wheat was at 94 percent emerged, which was 10 points ahead of the 5- year average.

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Ohio corn shy of half harvested, soybeans nearing completion

Combines kept harvesting despite the 1.7 inches of rain the State received last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 3.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 3.

Corn was 49 percent harvested, an increase of 12 percentage points from the last report. The average corn moisture content was 20 percent, a decrease of 1 point from last week. Soybeans were 78 percent harvested, an increase of 8 points over last week. The average soybean moisture content was 13 percent, the same as last week. Fewer growing degree days and cooler temperatures have slowed maturation down for both corn and soybeans, keeping progress behind the 5-year average for all reported categories. High corn moisture content slowed harvest progress across the State, particularly in the northern districts.

Winter wheat planted was just about finished as it reached 96 percent complete. Winter wheat was at 86 percent emerged, which was 13 points ahead of the 5-year average.

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Corn, soybean harvest continues

The State received approximately 1 inch of rain Saturday and Sunday last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 27.

Operators pushed their combines and hauling equipment hard to harvest as much corn and soybeans as possible during the warm temperatures and to beat the rain that arrived over the weekend. Corn harvested completion increased 11 percentage points over last week, but lagged behind the 5-year average by 19 points. The average corn moisture content was 21 percent and remained higher than the 5-year average. Soybeans harvested increased 15 points over last week and only lagged 7 points behind the 5-year average. The average soybean moisture content was 13 percent, the same as the 5-year average.

Winter wheat planted reached 91 percent and remained ahead of the 5-year average. Pasture rated in good to excellent condition decreased slightly and some producers were switching to hay for forage as some pastures were exhausted for the year

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Over half of Ohio soybeans harvested

Most of the State received cooler than normal temperatures and less than normal rainfall last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 20.

Conditions were ideal for harvest across much of the State, although corn maturity and percent harvested continued to lag behind normal levels. This resulted in an average harvested corn moisture content of 21 percent, compared to 18 percent last year. Soybeans continued to come off the field very quickly as percent harvested, at 55 percent, was one percentage point behind last year. Average soybean moisture content was 13 percent compared to 14 percent last year.

Winter wheat planters worked quickly amidst the favorable weather, staying ahead of the 5-year average pace. The crop continued to emerge ahead of the 5-year average as well. Pastures rated in good to excellent condition increased by 6 percentage points as fields dried out, although regrowth had slowed considerably.

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Dry weather allow corn, soybean harvest to continue

Most of the State received warmer than normal temperatures and less than normal rainfall, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 13.

Weather stations in the south and southeastern portions of the State reported almost 2 inches of rainfall on average, while the rest of the State received less than half an inch on average. Pasture condition rated good to excellent fell 4 percentage points, due to mostly warm, dry weather while 3rd cuttings of hay wrapped up and 4th cuttings of hay progressed rapidly.

A majority of corn reached mature status although harvest moved slowly, advancing only 5 percentage point increase from last week. Harvest progress trailed the 5-year average by 11 points. Soybeans harvested jumped 18 percentage points and trailed the 5-year average by 12 points. Corn saw a 1 percentage point increase in good to excellent condition rating while soybeans saw a 1 percentage point decrease.

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Warm weather provides soybean harvest opportunity

Warmer than normal weather early in the week helped push crop maturity, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 6. Most locales saw temperatures in the high 80s or low 90s which was much warmer than normal. This warmth was welcomed given the lack of crop maturity. Farmers kept an eye on the forecast and hoped for a later than normal killing frost as late planted corn and soybeans was still immature relative to normal. Some growers harvested their earliest planted corn and soybeans. Moisture levels were reported to be high. Corn silage was also harvested. The winter wheat crop was being planted much more quickly than normal due in large part to fields being available because they were not planted to other commodities this year. Pasture conditions were highly variable across the State. In the northern and central parts of the State, adequate rainfall was beneficial, while lack of rainfall in the southern part of the State was negatively affecting pastures and hay regrowth.

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Majority of crops not yet ready for harvest

Portions of the northwest and southeast corners of the State received just over an inch of rain while the rest of the State saw less than normal amounts of rainfall, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 29. Temperatures averaging about 8 degrees above normal coupled with dry conditions helped to mature corn and soybeans, although they were still well behind the 5- year average development. The percent of corn and soybeans rated in good to excellent condition increased 1 percentage point over last week but remained 30 percentage points below the 5-year average for soybeans and 29 percentage points below the 5-year average for corn. Winter wheat planting progress leapt ahead of last year and the 5-year average as planters rolled quickly through dry fields. Pasture conditions decreased slightly as growth was stunted, down 2 percentage points from last week and 21 percentage below the 5-year average.

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Harvest just starting around Ohio

Most of the State received little to no rainfall causing the soils to dry out, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 22.

Topsoil and subsoil moisture rated adequate to surplus both saw a 14 percentage point decrease from the previous week. Some crops were experiencing stress from the dry conditions. Crop conditions declined slightly from the previous week while hay and pasture re-growth had slowed. Warm conditions created more opportunities for fieldwork and crop maturity was accelerating. Producers tilled and worked prevent plant acres. There was also some hay making done last week. Corn and soybean harvest had begun and corn silage harvest continued. Winter wheat planting began and was making headway last week.

The full report is available here.

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Crop progress continues, despite dry weather

Dry, warm conditions prevailed last week which aided crop progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 15.

Crops were progressing rapidly in warmer conditions. Producers started to harvest corn silage last week. Corn silking and soybeans blooming were complete. There was no improvement in corn and soybean conditions. Other hay second cutting was nearly complete. Alfalfa hay fourth cutting made a jump in progress last week but was still behind last year’s pace.

There was very little rain across the State last week and topsoil moisture levels continued to decrease. Crops were maturing well with warm temperatures but rain was needed to improve conditions and pasture regrowth. Dry conditions allowed more opportunities for fieldwork, including tillage, manure management, mowing and spraying.

The full report is available here.

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Rain and cooler temperatures stressing crops

Cooler temperatures and scattered rain events were the norm for most of the State last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 1. Topsoil and subsoil moisture rated adequate and surplus increased from the previous week. Some crops began to show stress from continued rainfall. Warmer temperatures were reportedly needed for some late planted crops. In areas where fields weren’t too wet, producers were able to spray fungicides and herbicides, apply manure, and till prevent plant acres. Although wet conditions hindered crop progress in some areas, rains were generally beneficial to corn and soybean growth. Corn and soybeans rated in good to excellent condition showed a slight increase from the previous week. Alfalfa hay second cutting and oat harvest wrapped up last week. Progress was made in both alfalfa and other hay third cutting and a few producers were able to start alfalfa fourth cutting.

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Rains keep coming for Ohio’s crops

Cooler temperatures and scattered rain events were the norm for most of the State last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office.

There were 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Sept. 1.

Topsoil and subsoil moisture rated adequate and surplus increased from the previous week. Some crops began to show stress from continued rainfall. Warmer temperatures were reportedly needed for some late planted crops. In areas where fields weren’t too wet, producers were able to spray fungicides and herbicides, apply manure, and till prevent plant acres.

Although wet conditions hindered crop progress in some
areas, rains were generally beneficial to corn and soybean growth. Corn and soybeans rated in good to excellent condition showed a slight increase from the previous week.
Alfalfa hay second cutting and oat harvest wrapped up last
week. Progress was made in both alfalfa and other hay third-cutting and a few producers were able to start alfalfa fourth cutting.

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Rains supportive as Ohio crop progress continues

Timely rains helped some corn and soybean fields last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 25. The perimeter of the State received much of the rainfall while counties across the middle of the State received fewer showers. Overall, the State received slightly higher than normal amounts of rainfall. Temperatures and base 50 growing degree days were slightly higher than normal levels as well. Topsoil moisture rated adequate and surplus saw a 2 percentage point increase from the previous week while subsoil moisture rated adequate and surplus saw a 3 point decrease. Corn, soybeans, oats, and hay all continued to lag behind the 5-year average progress in all categories listed. Rainfall was a blessing as 52 percent of corn was in dough stage and 70 percent of soybeans were setting pods. Even with the timely rains, corn rated in good to excellent condition was 31 percentage points below the 5-year average rating and soybeans rated in good to excellent condition was 29 points below the 5-year average rating.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Scattered rains change things up

Scattered rains helped some corn and soybean fields last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 18. Fields that received scattered rains last week were helped while fields not receiving any rain continued to suffer. Rainfall was sporadic and scattered even within counties with some areas of a county receiving an inch or more of rain while other areas in the same county received no precipitation. Overall, State level topsoil and subsoil conditions improved, though this improvement was not experienced evenly across Ohio. Crop conditions continued to deteriorate and remained in much poorer shape than 2018. Much of the corn in the State was pollinating or just past pollination and growers not receiving any precipitation, either naturally or through irrigation, were concerned about grain fill. The same concerns existed for soybeans as pod fill began in over half of Ohio fields.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Soil moisture levels down

Warm and dry conditions continued last week as operators were busy in the fields, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 11. Topsoil moisture moved from 38 percent short and very short to 46 percent short and very short last week while subsoil moisture moved from 25 percent short and very short to 33 percent short and very short. Corn and soybean progress continued to lag behind in all categories and could use timely rains for grain fill. Winter wheat harvest wrapped up last week. Oats were also harvested during ideal harvest conditions and surpassed the five-year average. Hay making showed steady progress, but overall progress lagged slightly behind the five-year averages. Conditions were ideal last week across much of the State for spraying weeds, applying fungicides, installing drain tile, mowing, and many other field activities.

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Dry conditions allow wheat harvest

Limited rains were received at the beginning of the week followed by warm, dry weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 28. Warm, dry conditions allowed producers opportunities to get out in the field. Oat and wheat harvest moved steadily. More corn started silking and early planted fields began to dough. The earliest planted soybeans were setting pods.
Hay harvest progressed well aided by dry conditions. Some crops, especially those planted late, were showing signs of stress from the decrease in precipitation and extreme heat. There was a lot of cover crop planting on prevent plant acres. Warm weather allowed mowing, manure applications, spraying activities, and other field work to take place. Milk production decreased with the heat.
The complete report is available here.
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Timely rains support Ohio Crop Progress

Scattered rain events were beneficial to crops affected by recent extreme hot dry weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 21. Wet conditions prevented some field activities. Corn and soybean conditions were still mostly fair. Wheat harvest progress remained slightly behind last year and the 5-year averages. Producers were waiting for dryer conditions to complete harvesting. Oat harvest began in some areas. Early in the week, conditions were adequate for harvesting before most areas received some rainfall. Hay continued to be cut and bailed. First cuttings were complete and second cuttings were progressing well. Pasture and range conditions were mostly fair. Some pastures showed signs of stress before the rain.

Click here to read the full report, sponsored by Bane-Welker Equipment

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Wheat harvest jumps from last week, lags behind a year ago

There was abundant field activity last week as temperatures remained above normal and rainfall was very light, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were a season high 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 14.
Clear skies allowed farmers to spray herbicides and side dress fields where necessary. Corn leaves were rolling on sandy soils and in hot, dry areas of the State. Soybean and corn conditions improved slightly from the prior week as the rains slowed and fields dried out. Reports of corn and soybean replanting meant varying levels of plant progress within some fields and overall delayed maturity.
Wheat combines rolled quickly, as wheat harvested progress was up 35 percentage points from the prior week. Oat condition improved slightly from the prior week as 42 percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition. The hot, dry weather was good for making hay last week.
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Another active week for Ohio Crop Progress

Warm temperatures accelerated fieldwork despite above average rainfall last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 7. Statewide temperatures averaged approximately 6 degrees above normal. Operators took advantage of rain free days early in the week to plant, and in some cases replant, soybean and corn fields. When the rain did fall, it left ponding in low lying areas of some planted fields, stressing crops. Wheat harvest began in northern Ohio while it continued in southern Ohio. Oats were 76 percent headed last week and harvest was about to begin for some southern Ohio farmers with workable field conditions. Wheat condition remained low as 28 percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition, compared with 83 percent last year. Hay harvest progressed quickly as operators hurried to put up their cuttings before the rain fell during the last few days of the week.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Summer finally arrives

Last week was the single best week for fieldwork of the 2019 growing season, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending June 30. The week was the warmest week in the 2019 growing season and most areas saw their first 90 plus degree day this year. Farmers pushed themselves and their equipment hard to try and make up for time lost to an otherwise cold and very wet planting season. Through the whirlwind of activity, farmers were able to make progress on cutting an overly ripe first cutting of hay, plant soybeans at a fast pace, spray for weeds, and apply much needed fertilizer. Wheat harvest began in earnest for some growers in southern Ohio, while growers in northern Ohio readied themselves for the impending harvest. Wheat condition going into harvest was much worse than last year.

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Historic wet weather keeps planting progress lagging

Once again, much of Ohio received higher than normal amounts of rain last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office.

There was less than 1 day suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending June 23. Temperatures were slightly below normal levels. Base 50 growing degree days continued to lag for the season. Corn and soybean planted and emerged progress continued to crawl behind their 5-year averages as fields became increasingly saturated. Wheat stands endured scab and other diseases and weed pressure as wet fields were difficult to treat or remained untreated. Hay and other forages continued to be cut slowly.

Condition and quantity was becoming a concern for some livestock producers as some fields remained unavailable for harvest. Pastures moved from 55% good to excellent condition down to 46% due to the wet conditions and increased mud holes created by grazing livestock. Fruit growers were behind on fungus and disease treatments and reported some aborted fruit sets.

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