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2019 Ohio Crop Progress Update



Ohio Crop Progress: Scattered rains change things up

Scattered rains helped some corn and soybean fields last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 18. Fields that received scattered rains last week were helped while fields not receiving any rain continued to suffer. Rainfall was sporadic and scattered even within counties with some areas of a county receiving an inch or more of rain while other areas in the same county received no precipitation. Overall, State level topsoil and subsoil conditions improved, though this improvement was not experienced evenly across Ohio. Crop conditions continued to deteriorate and remained in much poorer shape than 2018. Much of the corn in the State was pollinating or just past pollination and growers not receiving any precipitation, either naturally or through irrigation, were concerned about grain fill. The same concerns existed for soybeans as pod fill began in over half of Ohio fields.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Soil moisture levels down

Warm and dry conditions continued last week as operators were busy in the fields, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 11. Topsoil moisture moved from 38 percent short and very short to 46 percent short and very short last week while subsoil moisture moved from 25 percent short and very short to 33 percent short and very short. Corn and soybean progress continued to lag behind in all categories and could use timely rains for grain fill. Winter wheat harvest wrapped up last week. Oats were also harvested during ideal harvest conditions and surpassed the five-year average. Hay making showed steady progress, but overall progress lagged slightly behind the five-year averages. Conditions were ideal last week across much of the State for spraying weeds, applying fungicides, installing drain tile, mowing, and many other field activities.

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Dry conditions allow wheat harvest

Limited rains were received at the beginning of the week followed by warm, dry weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 28. Warm, dry conditions allowed producers opportunities to get out in the field. Oat and wheat harvest moved steadily. More corn started silking and early planted fields began to dough. The earliest planted soybeans were setting pods.
Hay harvest progressed well aided by dry conditions. Some crops, especially those planted late, were showing signs of stress from the decrease in precipitation and extreme heat. There was a lot of cover crop planting on prevent plant acres. Warm weather allowed mowing, manure applications, spraying activities, and other field work to take place. Milk production decreased with the heat.
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Timely rains support Ohio Crop Progress

Scattered rain events were beneficial to crops affected by recent extreme hot dry weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 21. Wet conditions prevented some field activities. Corn and soybean conditions were still mostly fair. Wheat harvest progress remained slightly behind last year and the 5-year averages. Producers were waiting for dryer conditions to complete harvesting. Oat harvest began in some areas. Early in the week, conditions were adequate for harvesting before most areas received some rainfall. Hay continued to be cut and bailed. First cuttings were complete and second cuttings were progressing well. Pasture and range conditions were mostly fair. Some pastures showed signs of stress before the rain.

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Wheat harvest jumps from last week, lags behind a year ago

There was abundant field activity last week as temperatures remained above normal and rainfall was very light, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were a season high 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 14.
Clear skies allowed farmers to spray herbicides and side dress fields where necessary. Corn leaves were rolling on sandy soils and in hot, dry areas of the State. Soybean and corn conditions improved slightly from the prior week as the rains slowed and fields dried out. Reports of corn and soybean replanting meant varying levels of plant progress within some fields and overall delayed maturity.
Wheat combines rolled quickly, as wheat harvested progress was up 35 percentage points from the prior week. Oat condition improved slightly from the prior week as 42 percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition. The hot, dry weather was good for making hay last week.
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Another active week for Ohio Crop Progress

Warm temperatures accelerated fieldwork despite above average rainfall last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 7. Statewide temperatures averaged approximately 6 degrees above normal. Operators took advantage of rain free days early in the week to plant, and in some cases replant, soybean and corn fields. When the rain did fall, it left ponding in low lying areas of some planted fields, stressing crops. Wheat harvest began in northern Ohio while it continued in southern Ohio. Oats were 76 percent headed last week and harvest was about to begin for some southern Ohio farmers with workable field conditions. Wheat condition remained low as 28 percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition, compared with 83 percent last year. Hay harvest progressed quickly as operators hurried to put up their cuttings before the rain fell during the last few days of the week.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Summer finally arrives

Last week was the single best week for fieldwork of the 2019 growing season, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending June 30. The week was the warmest week in the 2019 growing season and most areas saw their first 90 plus degree day this year. Farmers pushed themselves and their equipment hard to try and make up for time lost to an otherwise cold and very wet planting season. Through the whirlwind of activity, farmers were able to make progress on cutting an overly ripe first cutting of hay, plant soybeans at a fast pace, spray for weeds, and apply much needed fertilizer. Wheat harvest began in earnest for some growers in southern Ohio, while growers in northern Ohio readied themselves for the impending harvest. Wheat condition going into harvest was much worse than last year.

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Historic wet weather keeps planting progress lagging

Once again, much of Ohio received higher than normal amounts of rain last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office.

There was less than 1 day suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending June 23. Temperatures were slightly below normal levels. Base 50 growing degree days continued to lag for the season. Corn and soybean planted and emerged progress continued to crawl behind their 5-year averages as fields became increasingly saturated. Wheat stands endured scab and other diseases and weed pressure as wet fields were difficult to treat or remained untreated. Hay and other forages continued to be cut slowly.

Condition and quantity was becoming a concern for some livestock producers as some fields remained unavailable for harvest. Pastures moved from 55% good to excellent condition down to 46% due to the wet conditions and increased mud holes created by grazing livestock. Fruit growers were behind on fungus and disease treatments and reported some aborted fruit sets.

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Crop progress report shows corn leveling off, beans still going

Much of the State received higher than normal amounts of rain last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 2.5 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending June 16. Temperatures slumped nearly 6 degrees below normal. Corn and soybean planted progress increased but were still well behind their 5-year averages. Wheat began to mature and was rated 65 percent fair to good condition. There were reports of hay fields and pastures that were difficult or impossible to mow due to increased soil moisture levels. Operators making haylage found it easier to stay on schedule than those making dry hay. First cutting progress for alfalfa and other hay also lagged behind their 5-year averages. Oats planted progress crept to 91 percent while oats reached the headed stage slower than the 5-year average. From the national scene, USDA reports that 100% of corn is planted, likely indicating that no more planting will take place.

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Crop progress made, still behind average

Rain fell at a slower clip last week compared to historical records for most areas across the State, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 3.3 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending June 9. Temperatures were close to historic normals for the State which helped dry out saturated fields. Corn and soybean planting progress increased quickly as eager operators got into the fields but progress still lagged well behind the 5-year averages. Wheat headed progress moved to 81 percent and there were reports of increased wheat scab pressure. Fungicide treatments were applied aerially due to saturated fields. Pastures were in mostly fair to good condition although hay quality was reportedly lower in some areas because of extreme moisture. Oats headed progress moved to 9 percent, lagging behind the 5- year average. Nationally, corn is 83% planted and soybeans are 60% planted.

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Crop progress continues to lag behind

More precipitation than usual fell across the entire State last week and again hampered planting progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field

There were 2.1 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending June 2. Temperatures were warmer than normal for the State but rain kept operators out of fields. Corn and soybean planting progress was slowed by wet soils again last week. Wheat and oats headed progress both lagged behind their 5-year averages. Hay and pastures were in good condition but forages could not be cut in many fields due to wet soils. Operators lucky enough to have dry fields were applying manure and spraying when possible.

 

 

 

 

Nationally as of June 2, 67% of the corn was planted in the top 18 production states compared to the five-year average of 96%. Soybeans were 39% planted in the U.S. compared to the average of 79%.

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Ohio Crop Progress: 22% corn planted, 11% soybeans

This Ohio crop progress update from USDA-NASS sponsored by Bane-Welker Equipment.

Many fields were still too wet for fieldwork but some producers were able to push through wet conditions and 100 complete some planting activities, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. 80 There were 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 26. Excess rain in many areas continued to stall fieldwork progress. Some corn and soybeans were planted in well drained fields. There were some reports of failed wheat and alfalfa due to saturated soils. Hay and pasture were in good condition but experiencing a lot of weed growth. Reports of tornados and strong winds caused further crop damage in parts of the State. Very little fieldwork was done last week.

Nationally, crop progress came in at 58% corn planted, below the 90% average.

Soybeans are 29% planted, compared to an average of 66%.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Slow and Wet

Very slow planting progress continued this week as rains hindered spring progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 1.9 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 19. Soils started to dry out at the beginning of the week, however, significant rain fell at the end of the week which stopped planting. Producers continued to have problems getting into the fields to plant due to wet soil conditions. Some corn and soybean planting and field preparation was done where conditions allowed, but for most, dryer, warmer weather was needed. Other activities included manure, fertilizers, herbicides application along with more air fertilizer applications for winter wheat.

Ohio Crop Progress coverage on Ohio Ag Net sponsored by Bane-Welker.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Wet Conditions Hindered Progress

Rainfall continued to stall planting progress and kept producers out of the fields, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 1.5 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 12. Soils were saturated and some standing water was present in fields. Fields have been too wet for tillage equipment in some areas. Some corn and soybeans were planted but progress was still well behind last year and the five-year average. There was also a little progress in oat planting despite less than ideal planting conditions. Winter wheat condition remained guarded as wet soils have drowned out some wheat and prevented herbicide application in fields. There were some reports of producers applying fertilizer by airplane. Wet and cold weather was inhibiting field dry out and preventing fieldwork.

Ohio Crop Progress coverage on Ohio Ag Net sponsored by Bane-Welker.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Rain continued to stall planting

Little to no fieldwork was completed last week due to the continued extremely wet weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 0.6 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 5. There were multiple reports of zero days suitable for fieldwork last week. There had been some additional flooding and soils were extremely saturated, causing more delays in the planting season. Winter wheat condition remained mostly fair and there were concerns of weed pressure due to the wet weather. There was very little opportunity to get any corn or soybean planting done last week. Oat planting and emergence was slowly moving along. Despite wet weather, pastures condition were mostly fair to good.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Rain Slowed Planting Progress

Planting remained stalled last week due to higher than normal precipitation, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 1.1 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 28. Most fieldwork remained on hold as fields were too wet. There were reports of some localized flooding scattered throughout the State. Even with slightly higher temperatures statewide, growing degree days were lower than normal for the week. Winter wheat progress and condition continued to be negatively affected by soggy fields. There were reports of ponding causing some wheat to be drowned out. Oat planting and emergence both slowed and moved toward the 5-year average. Some operators were able to plant a little corn and soybeans, but progress remained behind 5-year averages due to wet soils.

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Ohio Crop Progress: Corn Planting Has Begun

The first reports of corn planting for the season occurred last week where soils were dry enough to hold planting equipment, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 2.2 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 21. The western portion of the State received the largest amount of rainfall compared to the rest of the State and compared to normal conditions. Temperatures were higher than normal on the eastern portion of the State while the rest of Ohio’s temperatures hovered around, or slightly below normal for the week. Wet conditions kept top-dressing and weed spraying to a minimum. Ponding in fields with low lying areas continued to stress winter wheat. Oat planting and emergence both continued to progress ahead of the 5- year average. Fruit trees and vines were in various stages of bud formation.

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Warm weather boosts fieldwork in Ohio Crop Progress

Temperatures were about 8 degrees above normal for the week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 2.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 14. Fields were still soft, but operators were able to spray weeds, spread manure, and apply top-dressings to fields before rain fell Sunday. Fruit trees were beginning to bud and winter damage assessments were being made. Cold season vegetables were reportedly going into the ground as soil temperatures began to increase. Oats were planted at a quick pace compared to the 5-year average while weather conditions allowed. Winter wheat continued to green up. Conditions improved slightly with 33 percent of wheat rated good to excellent condition.

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Ohio Crop Progress – April 8, 2019

There was little precipitation across the State last week yet many fields remained wet according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were 1.6 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 7. Field equipment was readied and some top dressing of winter wheat occurred. There were reports of winter wheat remaining dormant in the northern half of the state while some stands greened up closer to the south. Pastures were slowly turning green and operators were beginning to assess grazing conditions. Manure pits and lagoons needed to be emptied but dry, warm weather was necessary before this could occur. Operators planted oats at a quick pace during the short time they were able to get in the fields.

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