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2017 Ohio Crop Progress Update

Ohio’s Crop Progress — November 27, 2017

Dry, cool weather helped corn harvest and field work continue at a slow pace, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 3.8 days available for field work for the week ending November 26, 2017. Producers were able to enter fields when the soil dried enough late in the week or when the temperature fell below freezing. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 19 percent. Winter wheat seedings are almost fully emerged and the condition remains 88 percent good to excellent.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — November 20, 2017

Corn Harvest Lags After More Rains

Heavy rains stalled corn harvest for another week, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 2.8 days available for field work for the week ending November 19, 2017. Corn harvest is about 11 days behind the five year average. Producers are hoping for drier conditions and colder temperatures to open wet fields to harvest equipment. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 19 percent and soybean moisture was 13 percent. Wet conditions have also limited fall tillage and other field activities. Winter wheat is progressing well and the condition remains good to excellent.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — November 13, 2017

Rain this week has continued to slow down harvest, tillage, and manure spreading, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 3.2 days available for field work for the week ending November 12, 2017. More wet conditions throughout the week kept farmers out of the fields, but subfreezing temperatures in the mornings reportedly helped operators gain traction and keep harvesting once the rain stopped falling. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 19 percent and soybean moisture was 13 percent. Heavy amounts of rain fall impacted much of the state and hit especially hard in southern parts of the state. The heavy rains submerged low lying areas of fields and left farmers with little time to get into the fields in those areas. Winter wheat that was recently planted into hillsides was reportedly washed away in affected areas due to extraordinary rain events.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — November 6, 2017

Field conditions are extremely wet following storm activity on Sunday, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 2.9 days available for field work for the week ending November 5, 2017. Rain and cold weather throughout the week slowed harvest progress, but fields dried out sufficiently by Thursday to allow for some activities to take place before Sunday’s rain arrived, including fall tillage, manure spreading, and cover crop seeding. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 18 percent and soybean moisture was 13 percent. Severe storms on Sunday put many crop fields and pastures under water. Wind damage from tornadoes was also reported in isolated areas. Crop damage was still being assessed, but there were reports of flooding in wheat fields and corn stands impacted by water and high winds. Growers expected it to take several days for fields to dry out before corn and soybean harvest could continue.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — October 30, 2017

Showers at the start and end of the week slowed harvest progress, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 3.7 days available for fieldwork for the week ending October 29, 2017. Cool, wet weather at the start of the week was enough to keep corn harvest behind the 5-year average by 13 percentage points while soybean harvest remained 2 percentage points behind last year. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 18 percent and soybean moisture was 12 percent. Frost affected much of the state in the middle of the week, ending the season for some vegetable producers and road side stands. Winter wheat, hay seedings, and cover crops were reported to be in good condition.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — October 23, 2017

Dry weather accelerated harvest progress for many field crops, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 6.2 days available for fieldwork for the week ending October 22, 2017. Dry, warm weather for much of the previous week allowed producers to gain much ground for harvesting soybeans and corn. Some new soybean shoots were reportedly seen in harvested soybean fields due to shattered beans and aborted pods. Winter wheat planting and emergence progressed quickly due to improved weather conditions. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was at 19 percent and soybean moisture was at 12 percent. Final hay cuttings are coming off of fields. The warmer and drier weather provided a slight downgrade in pasture condition.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — October 16, 2017

Very wet weather during the week hindered crop harvest along with planting and other field activities, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 3.1 days available for fieldwork for the week ending October 15, 2017. Wet conditions followed by dry weather over the weekend allowed producers to make some progress for soybeans and corn. High winds reportedly flattened some corn fields but condition remained stable. Rain continued to aid winter wheat emergence and also held off at times to allow winter wheat planting to progress. Hay cuttings are nearing completion. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was unchanged at 20 percent, and soybean moisture was at 12 percent. The continued wet weather has increased soil moisture conditions while slightly increasing pasture conditions.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — October 10, 2017

Rain brought much needed relief to dry areas but brought harvest to a standstill, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 4.9 days available for fieldwork for the week ending October 8, 2017. Rains stopped most field activity but soils were so dry it was absorbed with little or no runoff or standing water. Harvest was progressing well for soybeans and corn but at a slow pace. Rain was favorable to winter wheat emergence and some planting was done when the weather permitted. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 20 percent, and soybean moisture was at 11 percent. The wet weather was very welcomed and improved soil and pasture conditions.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — October 2nd, 2017

Dry Weather Hastens, Complicates Harvest

Scarce to nonexistent rains and soaring temperatures helped dry down fields and open them to harvest, but the effect may have been excessive, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. What little rain did fall was confined to the northeastern part of the state. There were 6.8 days available for fieldwork for the week ending October 1, 2017. The average moisture content of soybeans harvested was 12 percent, but had fallen much lower in some areas. Some growers decided to wait until rain could add some moisture back before harvest. Other growers proceeded with harvest, taking measures to minimize shattering and splits. There were multiple reports of combine fires, underscoring the challenges of what has become a very dry season. Despite the challenges, many are reporting better than expected yields. Moisture content of corn harvested over the week, at 22 percent, remained fairly high.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — September 25, 2017

Extreme heat and dry conditions over most of Ohio helped push corn and soybeans to maturity last week, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Rain was largely confined to the northwestern part of the state with locally heavy spots. There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending September 24, 2017. However stages of corn and soybean maturity still vary widely due to interruptions and setbacks during spring’s wet planting conditions. Growers would also like to see more field drydown of corn before full-swing harvest gets underway. The average moisture content for corn harvested over the week was 26 percent, and the average for soybeans was 14 percent. Conditions were ideal for late season cuttings of hay, but hay fields and pastures are showing signs of stress.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — September 18, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 4.01.47 PMDry Conditions Continue

Limited rain fell over the week, extending a dry spell as growers gear up for harvest, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 5.6 days available for fieldwork for the week ending September 17, 2017. Very little residual rainfall from Hurricane Irma was available, and most of the state’s rain fell in southern and central Ohio. Temperatures were slightly above normal in the northeast part of the state, and a couple of degrees cooler than normal in the southwest. The harvest of corn silage continued, and farmers began harvesting early maturity soybeans and high moisture corn. However, the wet conditions prevalent at the start of the season that caused planting delays and replanting of many fields has resulted in a lot of variability in maturity stages at this point. Some fields could still benefit from precipitation. Crop condition ratings remained steady, but hay and pasture conditions declined slightly.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — September 11, 2017

Conditions have been mostly dry with the exception of some scattered rain in some counties thorough out the week, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 5.5 days available for fieldwork for the week ending September 10, 2017. Crops that haven’t reached maturity could still benefit from rain, and the lower temperatures conditions have slowed down crop maturity. The effects of a dry turn after a relatively wet season continue to be evident. Some corn appears to be dying prematurely, most likely from nitrogen loss and shallow roots that were consequences of the extremely wet spring and early summer. Late season weed escapes presented problems in some soybean fields. Hay fields and pastures seem to be doing well considering the lack of rain and lower temperatures. Other activities for the week included apple harvest, hay cutting, manure application on wheat stubble, mowing, and preparation for fall wheat seedings.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — September 5, 2017

Spotty rains last week were expected to improve soybean yields on later planted fields, but for early planted corn and soybean fields, it may have been too little too late, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 5.4 days available for fieldwork for the week ending September 3, 2017. Overall temperatures remained below normal as daytime highs for the week ranged from the upper 70s to lower 80s, while nighttime lows ranged from the upper 40s to the lower 50s. Rainfall amounts ranged widely across the State with some areas reporting receiving more than two inches of rain during the week while other areas received very little, if any. Areas which have received very little rain have seen crops maturing faster than anticipated. Early planted soybeans were showing signs of yellowing leaves, and in some areas, soybeans development was reported to be at a standstill with pods aborting.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — August 28, 2017

Cooler than normal temperatures and dry conditions were unwelcome for most growers when moisture and warm weather could have helped with grain fill and maturity, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the 20 USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 6.3 days available for fieldwork for the week ending August 27th, 2017. Soil moisture shortages grew as rainfall was fairly limited for most of the state. Effects of the extended dry period were evident statewide. Pastures and hay fields were turning brown, corn fired prematurely and some reports of soybean pods aborting were noted. Commercial vegetable harvest continued, and growers had more opportunities to harvest hay.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — August 21, 2017

Temperatures across the state were above normal while most of the state saw very limited precipitation, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 6 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending August 20th. While most of the state saw small amounts of rain, some locally heavy rainfalls were observed, mainly in the southwestern and southeastern parts of Ohio. Soil moisture shortages grew over the week in a remarkable change from the wet conditions that prevailed earlier this season. However, topsoil and subsoil moisture supplies are still rated mostly adequate. Corn condition improved slightly and soybean condition was virtually unchanged, but many growers expressed concern over the lack of precipitation during the grain fill period, especially in fields with shallow roots. Widespread opportunities for hay cutting were beneficial, but regrowth prospects were limited. Range and pasture conditions are virtually unchanged but signs of stress are starting to appear there, too.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — August 14th, 2017

Aside from sporadic rainfall, most of the state received little to no rainfall, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending August 13th. For many growers, the drier conditions add additional challenges to an already difficult season. Excessive moisture earlier in the season caused nitrogen loss and delayed critical post emergence operations. Plants that were able to recover have shallow root systems and a diminished capacity for handling dry weather. Crop conditions still vary widely, even within small areas. Oat harvest is neared completion. Weather was favorable for hay, spreading of manure, spraying, and other field work.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – August 7th, 2017

Drier conditions reduced soil moisture surpluses and temperatures dropped midweek, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National  Agricultural Statistics Service.

There were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending August 6th. More farmers were able to return to the fields .

Some weed control measures took place this week along with manure application, fungicide and herbicide spraying, and tillage of wheat fields.

Commercial vegetable harvest continued, as did the baling of Hay. Crop conditions remain stable overall.

A primary concern for many growers was southern rust in corn. Other growers have are concerned about stunted soybeans. Shallow root systems in crops created concerns about adequate and timely precipitation.

The cooler temperatures were not ideal for crop development, but were beneficial to livestock.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — July 24th, 2017

Continued wet conditions hamper field work

While some areas of the state are still too waterlogged, some areas were dry enough for fieldwork until heavy rains over the weekend, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.There were 3.6 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending July 23rd. Some fields are showing damage from too much rain, particularly soybean fields with yellowing and some plant death. Growers were also having difficulty cutting hay, harvesting wheat, spraying fields, and spreading manure. Some growers resorted to aerial application of fungicides and pesticides. Wheat harvest moved closer to completion, but quality issues were found in the wake of the warm wet weather of late.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — July 17, 2017

Continued wet weather with heavy downpour events caused many fields to be lost to standing water and has stalled harvest, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 1.9 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending July 16th. Northwest and Central Ohio were drenched by heavy storms. Major rains fell in the vicinity of Hancock, Hardin, Seneca and Wyandot counties on already saturated soils. The Blanchard River near Findlay crested at 16.5 feet, which was three feet above major flood stage. Critical cropland drainage networks were overwhelmed and corn and soybean fields were inundated with water. Reports of Sclerotinia led many growers to scout fields for disease. Winter wheat is still in the fields as wet field conditions has prohibited harvest. Excessive moisture created concerns over head sprout. Pasture and range conditions changed little despite the rains. Farmers delayed manure applications and bailing of straw.

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — July 10, 2017

Wet Conditions Hinder Progress

Large rain events were negatively affecting field crops in many parts of the State, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.There were 4.1 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending July 9th. Rain throughout the week was beneficial in the Northwest where dry conditions have prevailed, but in central and southern counties, continued rain events have saturated soils and caused ponding in fields, raising concerns of root diseases in corn and soybeans. Hay fields were still reported in good condition, but wet weather challenged growers trying to mowed and bale hay. Producers took advantage of drier weather early in the week to make rapid progress with wheat harvest, but there were reports of lodging in wheat and oats caused by high winds.

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