Home / 2019 Between the Rows / After a late start, harvest is underway throughout the state

After a late start, harvest is underway throughout the state

Nathan Brown

We are a little better than 50% harvested on our soybeans. Now we are waiting on some more soybeans to ripen. We are hoping to get some wheat sowed today and do some fall burndown. We flew on some more cover crops yesterday into some standing corn, so it has been a busy few days.

We are extremely dry. The beans coming out of the field are around 10% moisture and we haven’t had any measurable rain for quite some time. The pastures and creeks are really starting to dry up on us now. With the cover crops we flew on a couple of weeks ago, we have a couple of fields where they germinated and came up. They aren’t really thick. We are hoping for a good rain over the weekend to get the rest of those cover crops up and germinated pretty quickly.

I am going to say we are probably 15 bushels off of our average with what we’ve cut so far. I think the dry spell really hurt us. And looking at some of our later planted beans and replants I don’t expect things to get any better.

Looking at the corn, the hot, dry weather has helped. We have some fields that are right on the cusp of blacklayer. We have a few early fields that are mature and they are getting dry enough to maybe starting shelling next week. The heat really helped the corn tremendously. If we’d have had a cool September then we would have been in a world of hurt, but the 90-degree temperatures have pushed the corn along.

The harvest progress around here is really variable. It depends on where you are, if you caught a rain or not and those planting dates. There are several guys who haven’t gotten into the fields yet waiting for the crops to mature. There are still a lot of bean fields with a lot of leaves left in them. The brunt of harvest really isn’t going to get started for another week or so here, and some people are still sitting and waiting.

 

Lamar Liming

There have been a lot of beans combined and wheat has gone in many fields after the beans around here. There are still a lot of beans just starting to turn and there are some green ones too. Many guys are done chopping, but there is still late corn still needs to be chopped too.

We still have adequate moisture around here. My yard is still green, but it hasn’t been too wet. In the last couple of weeks we have gotten just a couple of tenths here or there so there hasn’t been enough to really slow us down.

I have heard about yields from 30 to 70 and everything in between for beans. I would say most people are pretty happy with the beans. I haven’t really heard of anyone really shelling any corn yet so I don’t know about that.

The corn that was chopped had lower tonnage than we thought going in. That has been disappointing. There were drowned out spots and some of it was planted pretty late. To the south it got dry, so there were several variables behind the disappointing tonnage.

The heat sped up the beans. We broke some heat records at the beginning of the week. I am certain it helped the corn too. Today it feels like winter after that. The cows definitely like the cooler weather.

I don’t think people are going to plant more wheat than they have in recent years. Wheat acres, I think, will hold and maybe go up a little bit, but nothing really drastic as far as an increase in wheat acres around here.

Dylan Baer

We were able to get one field of beans off so far. We’re still wet. We get about an inch of rain every week. Our furthest farm south was the first field we took off on Tuesday. The next field of beans is still about a week away.

We were pleasantly surprised with the beans. For what they went through and when they were planted we can’t complain a bit. They started out at about 15.5% moisture and by the end of the day they were down to 12.5% or 13%. They made right in the mid-50s for yield. Looking at that field compared to our other ones I think some will be better and some not quite as good. If we can even come close to a mid-50s average that is way more than we anticipated when we planted them. All summer long we have been praying just for 40-bushel beans. South of us there has been some harvesting but up around Deshler there is not much going on yet.

All of our wheat is going on prevented planting ground. There are still two fields that have just been too wet to plant wheat. We are still waiting on the weather. We planted wheat into a soybean cover crop. The beans are dying off and the wheat is growing fast. It looks like it is taking up some of the nitrogen from the beans. It is amazing how tall the beans are that we planted on Aug. 1 as a cover crop.

Looking at the extended forecast and the beans it looks like we will be OK when a frost sets in. There is some concern about some of the corn reaching blacklayer. There is still a lot of drying to do, but we are still headed in the right direction.

It is amazing the summer we have had. It has been crazy. We thought we’d have the summer off because there were so many acres we didn’t get planted, but we have been busier than ever. The weather during the growing season has cooperated. That heat at the end of September and into October moved the beans along and the rain has been important.

Andrew Armstrong

Harvest started two weeks ago tomorrow. We ran about 600 acres of corn and 300 acres of beans. The corn moisture has been down to 17% or 18% and some as high as 25% or 26% moisture. We are mixing and drying and it is working out pretty well. The beans have been in the 11% or 12% range. Yields are just about par. For corn, the yield monitor has been going down to 100, up to 170 and everything in between. For beans, the yields are OK. They are not the best but they have not been the worst either.

When we first started shelling corn we were expecting low 20% moisture. Now we are in corn that is in the 24% area, which is about as wet as we’ll get I’d say. The bean moisture has been a little surprising.

One of the fields we were in, which was running about 20% moisture, had stalk quality that was some of the worst we’d seen with that particular variety. If a bad wind or storm had come through it would have knocked it down. Even with the higher moisture, we are willing to spend some money on propane just to get it in.

A lot of guys around here are cutting beans first. We have been working on more corn. There are still a lot of crops in the fields yet around here. I’d say it is maybe 20% harvested in this area. If you go a little north, it was dryer up there and there has been more harvesting. The yields are not looking great up there though.

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