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Conditions holding steady in late July Between the Rows

Lamar Liming – Trumbull/ Mahoning County

We probably had about 4 inches last week and we are too wet again. We got the heat too. It was terrible. North of me about 25 miles they got 6 inches of rain around Kinsman in northern Trumbull County Saturday morning. It washed roads out. It was unbelievable.

Today is nice, about 65 degrees here now, but by the end of the week it is supposed to be right back up to 88 here. The humidity is just terrible. I’m surprised how the cows kept going really. It dinged production some but not like I thought. I don’t know how they hung in like they did in that heat.

We got some straw made. Wheat straw quality was good. We got the second crop hay made too. The second cutting was not anything special, about average. It was definitely better than the first cutting but the yield was not there. Tons were below normal. I think it will take another year to get those tons back and get this hay crop going. We dried out there and that helped, but the ground is getting wet again.

We have not seen disease issues yet. I have never sprayed fungicides. The last few years I have been hearing about some fungicides sprayed around here.

The corn silage is still a long ways off. We are just starting to see some tasseling. If we get more extreme heat it will speed the process up for the silage though. I can’t believe how bad these fields looked at the end of June and how much better they are now. They really evened out, but are still uneven across the board.

Weed control has been alright so far, but I haven’t sprayed my later planted beans yet. The corn has excellent weed control. Hopefully we can get those later beans sprayed this week or we will have some problems with weed pressure.

Nathan Brown — Highland County

The heat has brought things on. It is looking a lot better. We got all of our beans post- sprayed. We are getting ready to start on some fungicide applications on soybeans tomorrow. Probably the first part of next week we will be looking at fungicides on corn too. Crop development has really progressed with the heat we’ve had the last week. Several of our first-planted corn fields are starting to tassel right now. We were not in full tassel during the heat so I hope going into the cooler weather this week will be good for pollination for this corn crop. Late last week we had over an inch of rain and we had about a half-inch last night so things are looking pretty decent moisture wise for right now.

On the wheat ground we are waiting for the weeds to green up and we’ll do a burndown today. We are then hoping to plant the cover crops on that ground this week. We are hoping to do some soil health building this year to prepare for next year’s corn crop.

The corn is maturing but it is still very uneven. The soybeans are thin and there is still a lot of uncertainty about what this crop will make. The markets do not seem to be reflecting how poor this crop is around the countryside and guys are still nervous about how this will play out.

We are definitely seeing some frogeye in the soybeans with these warm temperatures. I looked out last week and saw a little southern rust in the corn. We are seeing some gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight in places too. With the year we’ve had, every disease imaginable could be out there in these fields. We have some frogeye resistant varieties so we may not spray all of our soybean acres. We are going to spray our early maturities that are more susceptible. The corn is variety specific, but with the year we’ve had I think we’ll spray the majority of our corn acres with fungicide too.

Andrew Armstrong — Clark County

Everything is progressing in a positive direction. We got some rain yesterday and we got the heat and humidity. The corn is loving it and we are finally seeing beans taking off.

We definitely needed yesterday’s rain. It was one of the first widespread rains that hit every farm of ours. The last couple of weeks we’d had some pop-up showers that came pretty fast and didn’t really soak in, but kept everything going. This last rain was a really good one. It was a couple of showers here and there and it had time to really soak into the ground and do something.

We haven’t had too much disease pressure, but we are seeing a tremendous amount of weed pressure in some of our lower river-bottom soybean ground. We have waterhemp rearing its ugly head. We have been over some bean fields at least three times trying to do what we can with different mixtures to try and kill it before it is too bad. It is not out of hand, but we don’t want it to get out of hand so we are spending some extra time to get that taken care of.

I’m pretty sure it came in from all of the water we got. Most of the areas are where the rivers and creeks flooded and the seed has come from up river. Most of it is Roundup resistant so we have to try some other things. We are also dealing with some marestail. It looks like we fry them at first. They struggle for a bit and then they come right out of it. We are trying to get those marestail plants taken care of before canopy.

We were bushhogging some CRP ground and found a swarm of beetles. At first they looked like stink bugs, but they are not. We checked on the threshold and we are Ok right now but we have been watching the insects too.

All of the corn around here is at least shoulder high now. There have been some guys trying to sidedress with hi-boys for some late N and there is a lot of crop dusting going on too.

Dylan Baer — Wood County

We got our wheat off last week and finished just ahead of a 3-inch rainfall over a couple of days. I ended up being rained out most of the hot days of baling, which I was OK with. We were pretty dry before that rain came and that rain really set us up. The corn has been dark green and growing fast and last night we got another 1.2 inches, which is holding up the baling.

It actually did the little bit of crop we have in the field a lot of good. The crops actually look pretty good. If it was the end of June instead of the end of July we’d be right on track for some good crops, but we are still a month behind.

The hay was below average quality and amount for the first cutting. There was too much alfalfa missing and too many weeds. People like to buy bales of hay not bales of weeds. Everything is coming back pretty well and I have been selling it. People are buying whatever they can find. I had an ad up online for 24 hours and everything I was selling was gone. So it is worth something. I think the second cutting will be higher quality for sure. Tons might still be down but it does look like the alfalfa is taking over again.

The last several years we have been privileged to have some pretty decent yields. We saw 65 to 90 bushels so it is below what we’ve had but we still feel good about that and we were thankful to have it off before sprouting started to set in. We were pretty happy with Prosaro keeping the wheat healthy all the way through.

Weed control has been a real battle. The prevented planting acres have nothing growing but weeds. While we were baling we were trying to spray in the morning and bale in the afternoon. Now that the wheat is off we’ll get busy applying manure to wheat ground and planting cover crops on the prevented planting ground. There is no shortage of work around here. Even our bean fields we got planted are not canopied yet and the weed pressure is a real battle now.

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