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Time for a rain dance?

The promise of big rains mid-week has fizzled out for some areas of the state with growing concerns about worsening dry conditions early this growing season.

According to the USDA’s NASS, much of the state has fallen into negative rainfall totals compared to the normal levels. The towns of Ashtabula and Sydney currently have the greatest rainfall deficits with -5.71 and -4.64 inches, respectively. Gallipolis is 2.59 inches above normal, but is the exception. Statewide, the surpluses are vastly outnumbered by the rainfall deficits.

Jim Noel with the NOAA/ National Weather Service Ohio River Forecast Center said that the summer weather pattern is in full swing with temperatures slightly above normal and rainfall below normal this week and warmer weather next week with more hit-or-miss rains.

“All indications are a warmer and somewhat drier July for Ohio. The pattern of June that is warmer than normal and wetter western corn and soybean belt and drier in eastern areas (including Ohio) will last into July,” Noel said.

Time for a rain dance? As frustrating as the lack of rain can be, things don’t work out so well when we try to control the rain.

Jim’s rainy day

One day a guy named Jim figured out how to control the rain.

He grinned with glee at his newfound power. He figured the world he’d reign.

He set up a business (that for a small fee) could bring you rain or shine.

One week in his business boomed — things were working out fine.

Farmer McGinty needed rain for his corn. Farmer Smith needed some sun.

Betty Lou Harris had just planned a picnic and wanted guaranteed fun.

With a tip of his cap and a wave of his hand, Jim made their wishes come true.

That corn pollinated, the wheat harvest went well and the picnic skies were blue.

More farmers placed more orders. More events were planned.

Jim was making big money — his business going grand.

He could bring on the sun or precipitate, based upon a whim.

To predict what the weather would do, the local weatherman would call Jim.

But when farmer Smith wanted sunshine, Betty Lou’s roses would need water,

And when Sally next door wanted a tan, the rain would be a bother.

His phone was ringing off the hook one day with Farmer Smith pleading for rain,

But farmer McGinty was getting ready to bale a field of just dried hay.

Jim’s rain caught a breeze and moved — the high dollar hay was spoiled,

And then it flooded a newly dug basement where several workers toiled.

The runaway cloud blew into town on a parade of elderly veterans and their wives.

Mrs. McCallister ruined her perm and Miriam Whetherbee broke out in hives.

Then that cloud flooded the streets and six cars crashed — hydroplaning,

One car plowed through a storefront. Jim’s cloud just kept on raining.

Finally Jim caught up to the cloud that had taken off in the breeze,

With a tip of his cap and a wave of his hand he stopped the rain with ease.

But for his runaway raincloud Jim was sued for everything under the sun,

And soon enough he was penniless. His grand scheme was undone.

One would hope that Jim learned his lesson: Managing weather is not for the faint.

Yes to be the guy controlling the rain is something I’m glad I ain’t.

 

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One comment

  1. thank you for sharing the article with us. please keep on updating more useful informations…

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